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Old 11-02-2012
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Re: HMS Bounty in trouble...

Quote:
Originally Posted by preventec47 View Post
I have seen the plot that shows the Bounty's position for what appears
to be just the last 24 hours or so. Has anyone seen any plots showing
the Bounty's track for each day since leaving the dock in Connecticutt ?

I've read that he first headed due east before turning south and I'd
like to know how far east he went before the turn.

I saw a projected Hurricane cone track published on the 24th the day
before the Bounty left and that hurricane track shows it goiing
out to sea instead of turning into land in New England.

If, the captain used the projected track from the 24th, I can
see his reasoning for hugging the coast line.............
If you open this link and change the hours on the top to 360 and Update, you'll see it all. They didn't make any effort after leaving Long Island Sound to head East of a 900 mile wide storm, as early reports suggested. On their day of departure, the storms size was absolutely clear and all models had it coming to Hatteras, with almost all showing a turn to NJ. You can google the date read storm reports.

Bounty

If you watch the video above, it seems Robin was a nice guy. But he also said they "chased hurricanes". The pieces are starting to suggest a very intentional act to grab the Western side of the storm and be pushed south. They had done it before. But lion tamers are sometimes attacked by their lions.

Some continue to repeat that they weren't actually in a hurricane. I find that irrelevant. They seem to be intentionally in very heavy weather and looking for the southerly flow of the Western side of the storm. That choice left few if any options, if it turned out to be too tough for the boat or crew to handle.

Quote:
a tall 25 wave could be 25 feet above the
rear of the boat.washing over it. This is what we
are talking about here as far as the ship taking
on lots of water. Right ?
We don't know, but the survivors should be able to tell us. Also possible that planking let loose. Or both.
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