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Old 11-02-2012
JonEisberg JonEisberg is offline
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Re: HMS Bounty in trouble...

Please bear with me, I tried to post this early this AM, but my internet is painfully slow at the moment... Not surprising, for one whose house went underwater Monday night... (grin)

Paolo said it first, about 20 pages ago... that boat simply should not have been where it was, period... I've seen it suggested that there might be extenuating circumstances, perhaps even that Trowbridge was not even in command... Well, OK, in that event, whoever was holding a gun to his head when they left New London is the one who bears responsibility for this tragedy...

Quote:
Originally Posted by zeehag View Post
they were never IN a hurricane. never. they wer e WEST of the hurricane and AST of a strong cold front, that was merging with the hurricane. if you GO TO BOUNTY'S FB AN DWEB PAGES you will see the path exactly between the two fronts. no steep seas and winds were only 40 mph, as per the rescue scene. where the two fronts have meeting winds, is a space not wide , to be able to use for a time.
"No steep seas"??? In the axis of the Gulf Stream, abeam of Hatteras, with the eye of Hurricane Sandy abeam to the east???

Sorry, but you cannot be serious… There is simply no way to “skirt” a storm 800 miles wide, that tracks north a couple of hundred miles off the Outer Banks, by passing to the west of the eye… And, your belief that the BOUNTY would have been in “milder winds and seas” betrays precious little understanding of what a southbound passage around Cape Hatteras entails…

Even for a seasoned crew of Volvo Race veterans, departing Newport a week ago aboard a 100’ Swan, such an attempt to shoot the gap between such a monstrous area of circulation and Hatteras, and being in the Stream abeam of the passage of the storm’s eye when the breeze was northerly at it’s greatest strength, to do so would be a maneuver of extreme risk… For a vessel as un-weatherly as the BOUNTY, with that compliment of crew, reliant upon engines and generators to deal with such conditions, such a plan borders on the suicidal, one of the most ill-advised acts of seamanship by a professional mariner I’ve seen in a VERY long time…

Watching that interview, I’ll cut Trowbridge a bit of slack, perhaps to a certain extent he was grandstanding for that idiot conducting the interview… But anyone who takes literally his preposterous claim that being on the deck of the BOUNTY in 70’ seas would be a tame, placid experience, not much different than standing there on deck while moored in Belfast, is either a fool, or dreaming, or has never sailed on any body of water beyond a pond…

I can appreciate the comments from those who caution that we should “wait until we know the full story”, et cetera, before rendering judgment on the master’s decision to proceed when he did… Fair enough, and generous and respectful in spirit, but I find his decision nothing short of unfathomable… And, I would like to hear anyone’s suggestions for any reasons or rationale that were sufficiently compelling to take such a gigantic risk, aboard such an unsuitable vessel, with a shorthanded crew of indeterminate experience…

Again, "unfathomable" is the only word I can conjure suitable to describe it...
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