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Old 12-05-2012
JonEisberg JonEisberg is offline
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Re: HMS Bounty in trouble...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Brewgyver View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by JonEisberg View Post
(snippage)
Well, people learning to first sail aboard more sensibly sized boats might be a start...

Among the boats I delivered this year were a Gozzard 44, and a Cabo Rico 42, to new owners... In each case, they were the FIRST boat - of any size or kind - that either one had ever owned...

On the CR, I could hardly see around the plotter... (grin)
(Image snipped for those on 1200 baud dial up )
Jon, that seems like a really good point. Since we're waiting, may I interrupt to ask something? I'm on my first sail boat (30' Catalina), and when I was shopping for it I wondered if I was pushing the edge of too big. I had found a good deal on a 25, but almost had a concussion trying to stand up in the cabin. So then it was between a 27 and 30. I have since been told by a couple of my saltier dockmates that the 30 was a good choice. I would value your opinion, along with the other more experienced posters here. TIA.
I've always reckoned 30' is at or near the upper limit of a reasonable size boat to learn to sail on... I'm sure you've made a good choice...

The reason larger boats are not as effective as learning platforms, is the difficulty for a beginning sailor to feel the difference any of his inputs make, whether it be modest steering adjustments, slight trim adjustments, whatever... That's why smaller dinghies or keelboats are so much more effective as learning tools, the feedback is instantaneous, and usually much more apparent... I just don't see how one can really learn much about sailing from a 44-footer with hydraulic steering, or certainly not very quickly, at any rate...

I suspect that's one of the reasons I see so many cruisers today motoring everywhere... So many started out big from the get-go, they never experienced that feel a small boat sailing in the groove, finding that sweet spot with one hand on the tiller, the mainsheet in the other, and the subtle interplay that makes sailing such a pleasure...

Good luck, you'll do just fine with your Catalina... One suggestion I'd make, try to do some racing as crew at every opportunity, you'll learn lots in a jiffy that way...
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