SailNet Community - View Single Post - HMS Bounty in trouble...
View Single Post
  #1318  
Old 12-13-2012
chef2sail's Avatar
chef2sail chef2sail is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Maryland
Posts: 7,008
Thanks: 29
Thanked 55 Times in 51 Posts
Rep Power: 7
chef2sail will become famous soon enough
Send a message via AIM to chef2sail
Re: HMS Bounty in trouble...

Quote:
Originally Posted by JulieMor View Post
If you go back to the first tall ship race in 1956 you will see the people who organized the race saw it was very popular and formed a new organization. From there the whole tall ship genre has seen quite an evolution but somewhere in this loose classification that now exists was, most likely, profit motive.
Maybe that was some of it, as money is behind lots of motivations, but I think it was also part of motivation was insure the viability of their organization and "grow" it so to speak to increase the participants. Maybe for money, but maybe also to embrace the "old era of sailing" amongst more people. If it remained just these huge ships the organization would just stayed a small finite number. The other other smaller Tall Ships which were part of the era and design of Tall Ships would be shut out or formed their own orgnization, which would have been much larger.

There is a large educational/ experience component in this organization also and it encouraged oppertunities to a large group.

When they have their races between Tall Ships, they came up with the classification system and had some way of comparing like ships with like ships, just as we do today with the modern classifications.

The motivation for the different classes is contained in the this statement

Quote:
A tall ship is not a strictly defined type of sailing vessel. Most of us use the term to mean a large traditionally rigged sailing vessel, whether or not it is technically a “ship”. The United States Coast Guard’s training ship Eagle, for example, is technically a “barque”. A tall ship can also be a schooner, brigantine, barquentine, brig, ketch, sloop, or a full-rigged ship depending on the number of masts and the cut of the sails.

For the purposes of classification and race rating, Tall Ships America adheres to the descriptions found in the Racing and Sailing Rules and Special Regulations established by Sail Training International.

CLASS A
All square-rigged vessels and all other vessels over 40m (131 feet) length overall (LOA)

CLASS B
Traditional-rigged vessels with a LOA of less than 40m (131 feet) and with a waterline length (LWL) of at least 9.14m (30 feet).

CLASS C
Modern-rigged vessels with a LOA of less than 40m (131 feet) and with a LWL of at least 9.14m (30 feet), not carrying spinnaker-like sails.

CLASS D
Modern-rigged vessels with a LOA of less than 40m (131 feet) and with a LWL of at least 9.14m (30 feet), carrying spinnaker-like sails.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
___________________________
S/V Haleakala (Hawaiian for" House of the Sun")
C&C 35 MKIII Hull # 76
Parkville, Maryland
(photos by Joe McCary)
Charter member of the Chesapeake Lion posse

Our blog-
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


“Sailing is just the bottom line, like adding up the score in bridge. My real interest is in the tremendous game of life.”- Dennis Conner
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook