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Old 12-18-2012
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Re: HMS Bounty in trouble...

Quote:
Originally Posted by casey1999 View Post
I am not quite sure how these men sailed there ships. But like I said, they would use whatever knowledge they had at the time. I am sure once they learned about the season of hurricanes, they would do they best they could to avoid sailing in that season. These ships followed the trade wind route for good reason, once they learned the routes. They would keep an eye on the sky and wave height and direction- from these they could make educated guess as to what was over the horizon. These men did not have satelite forecast, nor radio comms (as Bounty had), but they made the best use of what they had. Sometimes they could not avoid a storm, and would loose a ship, but they would never knowingly sail into a hurricane.

Bringing up sailboat racing into this is a whole nother topic, let's not go into that here as that would be thread drift, maybe start another thread for that.
The boats used to find new routes and explore were Caravelas. That was mostly done by Portuguese and some Genovese that worked with Portugal. Even Colombo learned in Portugal and was married with a Portuguese. Magalhães that discovered the way to go to Spain trough the Pacific Ocean was also a Portuguese working for Spain.

Caravelas where the best upwind boats of that time.

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/7elGP3bGmgo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

After the map of winds was discovered those boats were substituted by ships that were made to sail mostly downwind. to give you an idea of the size of those babies take into consideration that the Bounty had a displacement of about 500T, those babies, the called Manila Galleons, on the XVI century averaged between 1600 to 2000 tons. They had full knowledge of the Hurricane season and sailed out of it even if several big vessels were sunk by hurricanes out of season.

Manila galleon - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Regards

Paulo

Last edited by PCP; 12-18-2012 at 09:03 PM.
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