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Old 01-28-2013
glenndamato glenndamato is offline
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Re: Newbe with no experience buys big boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by davidpm View Post
Now to grill Glenn.
Are you sure your leaks were hull-deck joint?
I read your book very fast so forgive me if I missed some stuff but did you remove everything from the deck and rebed.
Even some handrails or blocks mounted to the deck can let in a lot of water.

Also 5200 is considered the wrong stuff to use for bedding above the waterline.
You want something that stays soft and is not such a powerful adhesive.
The idea is that that a super adhesive like 5200 will not allow any movement and will actually cause things to crack someplace else and allow water in.
Someone will reference the appropriate thread for your next boat.
I'm not sure exactly where the water was coming in, except that it was not from the ten new bronze ports I installed. The deck and cabin top had plastic foam core. My theory was that this foam core was getting saturated somehow, probably from multiple sources, probably chiefly the hull-deck joint. Once the core got saturated, it "rained" inside the boat from hundreds of points! In the end, it seemed like the only thing left to be done was re-bed the joint, which requires pulling the deck off the hull with a crane. That, of course, requires taking the entire boat apart - rig, stays, lifelines, gunwales, EVERYTHING - in Mexico, and I was told it would not be any cheaper than having it done in CA, because the pace would be slower. Even after all that, there would be no guarantee of a dry belowdecks. I would not find out until I had sailed into the equatorial zone the following May on the way to the Marquesas and hit some rain squalls. Note: spraying the boat with a high pressure hose does not provide an adequate test. At sea, the boat is flexing and gaps open up that remain closed when the boat is tied to a dock.
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