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Old 02-08-2013
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Re: Lets have a chat about multis.

Originally Posted by PCP
T.....When the boats are certified as class A it comes in the technical file:
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http://www.catamarans-fountaine-pajo...eng_lip045.pdf
http://www.cata-lagoon.com/site_agen...re_09_2012.pdf

Quote:
Originally Posted by TropicCat View Post
I see you located the catamaran CE class A documents and take it that you've withdrawn your comment?
I guess you never understood what i have said. I do like cats and I did not said that they where not offshore boats. What I have said was:

Quote:
Originally Posted by PCP View Post
..
Putting it another way: A good 30ft monohull can pass EC certification as a Class A boat, I don't believe a 30ft cat would be able to do that.
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I have not said that catamarans were not blue water boats. I said that size by size mono-hulls were more seaworthy and I am talking generically not referring any specific model.
Quote:
Originally Posted by TropicCat View Post
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The CE class A rating for the Tomcat 9.7 is here:
TomCat Boats Designer & Manufacturer of Exceptional Catamarans

Which of course means that a 32 foot catamaran is also CE class A certified. Apparently a cat can not only manage it, but manage it with less LOA than a monohull.

What was your point again?
My point was the same from the beginning. The Tomcat 9.7 is a great 32ft cat but not a 30ft boat. It is not also the typical cat with lots of interior volume and standing height. It is low and wide and that's why he is more stable and seaworthy than the typical cat:





The typical 33ft cat,the ones that dominate the market, with a good height and interior space, are Class B boats, like this nice one:





As I said I was talking generically. If we go for particular cases (not mainstream designs) we can have Class A mono-hulls with a lot less than 30fts, like the Fisher 25 or the Vancouver 28, just to mention two.

Fisher 25 - Introduction

Vancouver 28 - Introduction

Let me tell you again to make it clear: I am not saying that Cats are not offshore boats, quite the contrary. What I am saying from the beginning is that generically, size by size, monohulls have stability characteristics that make them more seaworthy.

One a monohull you can get knock down and come back with no problem, you can get rolled and with some luck still have a functional engine and even if the rig is lost you can jury rig. On a cat you can't so it is normal that a bigger stability and bigger safety margin would be considered as a safety measure. It is what it is done in the ERCD regarding Classifying Monohulls and Cats regarding the sea and wind conditions they are suited to navigate.

I hope this time It is clear

I do like cats and the only reason I don't consider them is because a fast cat with what I consider an adequate safety margin for offshore work, it is very expensive, much more than a less faster mono-hull equally suited for offshore work.

Regards

Paulo

Last edited by PCP; 02-08-2013 at 01:09 PM.
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