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Old 03-02-2013
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Re: Rudder lost at sea and rescue

Quote:
Originally Posted by caberg View Post
Ha! I love hypocrisy. At it's finest right here.
Yes typical response, point back to be..so how does that relate to what youd did. Your the only defense when you get found out is to point the fingers back. Difference between us is that i readily admit how I am. Must be nice to be sanctimonius and thing of yourself better than that, but you arent. Your right there down in the mud with me

Just dont try it in a court or when flying your plane. That defense wont hold up

Your honor...lets not talk about what I did...others are also doing it...in fact you do it so you have no right to say anything to me about it.

Again to me, IMHO you missed my point. While you praised the Captain I have doubts about him. That being his crew appeared to be unexperienced to face a journey that he was taking.

In case you didnt notice I changed my mind as I read more I changed my mind about him leaving his vesel when it wasnt sinking. Thank god he abandoned ship, he may have killed everyone eventually with that kind of inexperienced crew should problems arisen in really tough conditions. Someday we may refer to those who venture forth thinking they can conquer all with an inexperience crew the " Bounty Syndrome"

Having crossed the Atlantic only twice in my life in a sailboat ( I was in my early 20s). Both times the experience was daunghting. The first time I had no experience but the other 5 had plenty of it so that we were never shorthanded or lacking when the weather got rougher. The conditions were fairly begnin for the 20 days passage, yet still for my experience level I learned a huge amount about open ocean sailing every day.

Part of what I learned is that you cannot depend on being rescued and that the crew and you have to be resourceful enough to survive situations either to pull through or be rescued.

Even the second time I was the least experienced of the 6 and had a better understanding of what the passage entailed, we hit some rougher weather 1600 miles northwest of the Azores for 3 days. Seas of 20-25 frt and winds steady at 30. It was somewhat frightening to me even tough we were "safe" on our boat to look around me. The confidence which I had in experience of the rest of those around me gave me a great sense of security.

Even today 35 years later, I would not take a passage across the Atlantic Ocean with a crew of 4 in which only the Captain and I had any previous ocean experience to handle the situations which WILL or MIGHT occur. Half your crew of 4 with no experience. One wanting to bail after 1 day out.

The Captain should never have left, or should have turned around when two of his crew wanted off not pressed on. warning signs should have gone off, but no he pressed on. He was fortunate that this rudder failed ( for whatever reason) so he could safely get off the boat in begnin conditions. Another point...his rudder failed before and he didnt have a way to overcome the failure and called for help, What did he learn from that? Nothing apparently.
No though about a backup rudder or plan for steerage should it happen again.
Which it did,

He took a risk, with his wife and these two "passangers" that I would not be willing to take. Borders on reckless.
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