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Go Back   SailNet Community > Skills and Seamanship > Apps & Authors
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Apps & Authors This forum is specifically designed for authors, designers, and members to showcase their wares. These must be sailing related!!!


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  #401  
Old 05-29-2011
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Riptide is another pretty good book
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1978 Tayana 37

Freedom comes when youíre ready to sail away. True freedom comes when you donít have to return


Cut off from the land that bore us, betrayed by the land we find, where the brightest have gone before us and the dullest remain behind, .......but stand to your glasses, steady,.......tis all we have left to prize, raise a cup to the dead already, hurrah for the next that dies
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  #402  
Old 05-29-2011
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Two essentials that almost never get mention:

"Oceanography and Seamanship, 2nd Edition", William G. Van Dorn.

"The Complete Rigger's Apprentice", Brion Toss.

Almost every other title mentioned tells of adventures and the crossing of oceans, the making of the sailors into men. These two titles tell of the oceans you sail on, and the boats you do it in. Van Dorn's will tell it to you in numbers, as well as what the numbers mean. Brion Toss's is already classic for the rope work and tricks, but I soon found the rest of the book very compelling for its discussion of the rigging and how it makes the boat go.
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  #403  
Old 05-30-2011
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Boasun will become famous soon enough Boasun will become famous soon enough
For your teens or your younger self "True Spirit" by Jessica Watson.

A GREAT Read
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Maritime Instructor
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S/V Rapture
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  #404  
Old 05-31-2011
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I just finished a fun, meaningless, trashy novel called: Sex, Lies and Spinnakers. I read it on my Amazon app and it was an interesting read that related to sailing, cruisers from Mexico to South Pacific. It was a who unit.
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Sailing on The Central Chesapeake Bay, West River, MD on my Catalina 27, Aelous II with my wife and friends.
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  #405  
Old 06-04-2011
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I just ordered

Cruising At Last: Sailing the East Coast

Singlehanded Sailing: The Experiences and Techniques of the Lone Voyagers

and
The Self-Sufficient Sailor"

$22 all together from Amazon!!
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  #406  
Old 06-24-2011
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Thumbs up Captured my heart, by Joe.

As a child, I would read everything I could. My Grandmother gave me a copy of ďThe Sea Devilís FoícísleĒ by Lowell Thomas. It is the biography of Count Felix Von Luckner, who as a young man, ran away from his fatherís castle and went to sea aboard a wooden whaling vessel. His true adventures, illustrated with photographs of himself and the ships and scenes from the days of iron men and wooden ships are priceless. The sea stories he relates in this book are not only humorous, or sometimes tragic, but supremely illustrative of what life aboard was like in those transitional times between sail and steam. Von Luckner is larger than life going from a lad before the mast to captain of a German privateer during the war that preyed very successfully upon allied shipping without a single life lost. Lowell Thomas has a second book about Count Von Luckner titled, ďCount Von Luckner, The Sea DevilĒ which details his exploits and adventures as the last privateer? I still have these two books, printed in 1927, and I plan to take them back to sea with us when my daughter and I set sail in two years.
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  #407  
Old 06-28-2011
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Didn't have time to check all 41 pages of posts to see if these have already been recommended :

The Custom of the Sea by Neil Hanson

and everything by Frank Dye - Ocean Crossing Wayfarer is probably the best.
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  #408  
Old 06-28-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeWhy View Post
(It reads fine for me in FireFox.)

I love this quote: "Itís taken me time to understand it, but now I know that change sometimes comes to a man like a flying iguana through a thatched roof. The trick is to keep your eyes on the opening it makes in your roof... through it comes the fresh air and light."

Thanks for the link.
Your welcome, I thought it was a great story.
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  #409  
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Dove by Robin L. Graham

I got my start in sailing when I forged my dad's signature to get the Time - Life Library of Boating books mailed to me, one every other month (12 in all.) (This was in the early 70's. I was around 10 years old.) When a book came in, I dove into it and didn't come out until I had the entire thing memorized. I was so engrossed in the subject that my mom hired an old salt who lived aboard his 32 foot sloop (Jade) to give me lessons on weekends.
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  #410  
Old 06-29-2011
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The Rudder Treasury

The Rudder was a yachting magazine first published in 1891. The Rudder Treasury contains some of what the editors considered the best of those articles on a number of topics from boat design to general advice. The first chapter is devoted to winter reading.

The basic philosophy of the magazine is summed up nicely in the foreword:

[Thomas Fleming] Day and his successors were of the school that the doing was more important than the having. As a result, there was little in The Rudder about buying stuff off the shelf and more about making it. Cruising wasn't about driving from one marina to another and plugging the air conditioner into the grid; it was about handing, reefing, and steering, and cooking up a meal of boiled potatoes and canned beans when you got there. Racing was about the joys of competition without any chest-pounding braggadocio at the finish line.

The publisher is Sheridan House.

The articles are somewhat dated in their terminology (references to "Negroes" but that was acceptable then) but most are still very relevant to boaters today. The articles vary in length so you can read a few to end your day at anchor with a nice bourbon, or shoot through one while at the gas station. (I have an SUV and once read half of a newspaper section waiting for it to fill.)
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Catalina 30 TRFK

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Rock Hall Cruising Station

All things that are, are equally removed from being nothing. John Donne
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