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-   -   Catalina 42 vs french boats (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/boat-buyers-sellers-forum/68501-catalina-42-vs-french-boats.html)

zaccio 09-23-2010 04:35 AM

Catalina 42 vs french boats
 
Hello, I'm interested by a Catalina 42 what french boat is comparable to the Catalina in term of quality ? Because here in Europe most of the sailing boat are french.
thanks for your advice:)

Cruisingdad 09-23-2010 07:46 AM

Beneteau and Jeauneau are competitors. As far as models, maybe the 423.

night0wl 09-23-2010 08:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cruisingdad (Post 647145)
Beneteau and Jeauneau are competitors. As far as models, maybe the 423.

Hull length kept even, the Catalina will be more expensive by 12-20% in my observations. So, its possible to move up to a larger Beneteau or Jeanneau if you want to be price sensitive.

Keeping hull length a constant, there are compromises made in both boats so that they can hit a price point. The Catalina sacrifices some speed and uses last-gen engineering. The French builders use iron keels and weaker deck hardware (winches, sheets, rigging) and lots of veneers on interiors.

blt2ski 09-23-2010 09:03 AM

For the Jeanneau it would be an SO42i or the performance version an SO42iP.

With Jeanneau any how, they use the same hull in many cases for a typical cockpit cabin, along with a Deck salon version also. A choice of 3 keel depths in many cases, a shoal, std and deep/performance model.

Jeanneau and Beneteau have in the past used the Iron vs lead, as lead is mostly found from what I am recalling here in NA, I believe most of the lead mines have been used up in Europe, iron is much cheaper in Europe. This is what I am recalling as to why the french boats use iron.

If you are in Europe, you might also look at Bavaria, Hanse, DuFour, Delphia, Salona and Elan. These brands also cost within what I will call within the same reasonable price point range of Jeanneau, Beneteau and Catalina.

Marty

zaccio 09-23-2010 09:49 AM

Thanks for your answer, so the Catalina is not better ( quality of building, longevity, materials etc.) then standard sailing boat like Jeanneau, Beneteau, Bavaria ?

winddancer88 09-23-2010 10:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by zaccio (Post 647188)
Thanks for your answer, so the Catalina is not better ( quality of building, longevity, materials etc.) then standard sailing boat like Jeanneau, Beneteau, Bavaria ?

Bavaria doesn't belong in this conversation. Cored hull and saildrive vs. solid hulls and conventional props.

I would agree that Catalina's construction quality is not better than Beneteau/Jeanneau (but is similar). I do prefer their lead keels, heavier displacement, and deeper hulls shapes (on most models).

I think all three make great coastal cruisers, and in their larger models decent ocean crossers (NOT Southern Ocean crossers, though). Catalina's have more headroom, and better tankage, while the other two might get you to where you're going a little faster (and rougher).

Cruisingdad 09-23-2010 11:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by zaccio (Post 647188)
Thanks for your answer, so the Catalina is not better ( quality of building, longevity, materials etc.) then standard sailing boat like Jeanneau, Beneteau, Bavaria ?

CATALINA IS MUCH, MUCH, MUCH BETTER!!!! They are the Rolls ROyce of sailboats. The Ferrari. The Lamborghini. Plus, just owning one makes you look better. Makes you smarter. Look at me!

These Beneteau owners... pfft. Don't believe a word they say. They all have curled up mustaches and shave their legs. Can you trust a man that shaves his legs??!??

Hope that answered your question.

Brian

blt2ski 09-23-2010 11:42 AM

If you believe a work brian wrote, I have some ocean front property in the gobi desert I can sell you! Or would you like an active volcano in SW washington state, alaska, or iceland? I can work out a number of things, here

Not sure I would call Catalina the rolls royce, there are a few better built boats. The ones I mentioned, I would call grade C or ave build boats. Swan is probably a B, Oyster gets into the A range.

Frankly, I see altho not in quantity mind you, older Bene's, Jeanneau' > I have an 85, along with Hunter, and numorous other at the time US/canada built boat all still floating, sailing, treating there owners good. Some a shinier than others, due to owner upkeep.

Reality to me, is all are on par to a degree, yes some may be more of a C- to a C+, but all are sold at close to ea other in price point.

Now should a bavaria with a cored hull and sail drive be included? One could probably debate that, I would include, as the cost is what I would call reasonably close to with in the same market as the others I mentioned. Swan is 2-3 times, and oytser 4-5 times as much. where as all of the ones mentioned can be had with in 25-50% of ea others. Certainly if you find the ones in the upper range too expensive, that is out of your price point, I understand. I think most will say these are comparible to a degree, choose the one with the ambiance to your liking. Otherwise, all will get you to where you want to go in the style you wish to go in.

marty

Cruisingdad 09-23-2010 12:08 PM

Just so you know, Zaccio, here's a pic of Marty.

http://i528.photobucket.com/albums/d...e/Mustache.jpg

And I ain't showing you a pic of his legs!!

HEHE!

THis is all for fun, btw. There are a lot of things Catalina does better that I like which is why I buy their boats. But at the end of the day, I suspect thre is not much difference.

Brian

PCP 09-23-2010 12:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by winddancer88 (Post 647227)
Bavaria doesn't belong in this conversation. Cored hull and saildrive vs. solid hulls and conventional props.

....

I don't know what you mean about Cored hull's on Bavaria. They have a Hand-laid solid fibreglass hull with Kevlar reinforcement below the waterline and Cored hull above the waterline. That is for having max resistance to impact where it is needed and to put all the weight down making the boat as light as possible on deck.

Sail drives are today the choice of almost all European sailboat makers, from Bavaria to Halberg- Rassy and that is because they are a more comfortable (less vibration) and hassle free (water tight) transmission. Some years ago lots of European boats had conventional transmissions. They have almost all changed for what they consider a better system.

Regards

Paulo


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