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-   -   Coronado 41 (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/boat-review-purchase-forum/1011-coronado-41-a.html)

Cobra04 03-25-2001 04:37 PM

Coronado 41
 
We are new to sailing and are looking to buy a boat. A Coronado 41 has caught our interest. It is a 1972. I have heard both good and bad about Coronado. Any imput would be appreciated.

Jeff_H 03-25-2001 06:08 PM

Coronado 41
 
You might do a search as this topic was just discussed in the past few weeks. Here is the broad generalities of that discussion. Any boat this age is likely to have a whole range of issues, old sails, running and standing rigging that is past its useful life span, engine in need of overhaul, out dated deck hardware, keel to hull joint problems, deck core problems, poor electronics, shot uplholstery and deck canvas, and so on. Any combination of these can quickly exceed the value of the boat.

The Coronados were cheaply built and were more subject to problems than a well built boat. Beyond that, the type of person who buys in inexpensive boat often takes short cuts with outfitting and maintenance as well.

So fair or not these boats have a reputation for having more problems than other boats of that era. That reputation affects resale as well as purchase, so while you can buy them cheaply, you are stuck selling them cheaply. Adding to this problem, they have aesthetics that are an aquired taste that most of us have not bothered to purchase. This further drives down their percieved and resale value. If you make the effort to fix one up, you are less likely to get your money out of the boat than if you were to fix up a better quality boat.

As to their sailing ability, they appear to have a quick corky motion in a seaway and would not be my first choice for an offshore boat. Because of mediocre ventilation and sailing ability they are not my first choice for a coastal boat either. If you are looking for a cheap liveaboard or you found one that someone carefully fixed up and is selling a bargain, they could make a reasonable live aboard.

On one of these BB''s there is a guy who spent some time cruising the Bahamas on a 35 and while his review is a little mixed he really found the boat good for that purpose.

Jeff


Jeff_H 03-25-2001 06:09 PM

Coronado 41
 
Oh yeah, what ever you do, get the boat surveyed. Pay particular attention to the keel bolts and mast step area.
Jeff

rappitysnap 11-02-2008 09:19 AM

if you do a search for coronado sailboats on this site, just about every thread regarding the topic jeffh you seem to have gone out of your way to bash these boats and much of what you say is also not true. while i will agree they are not built to extreme standards but the construction is way heavier than production boats built today and they get the job done. these are good boats that are fully capable of long term cruising my 41 crossed the pacific all the way from the north atlantic, and i always run across coronados in different foreiegn ports in the carribean. i believe you can buy a better 40 footer but it will cost you 4x as much.

sailingdog 11-02-2008 09:24 AM

Rappitysnap-

Any reason you're foaming at the mouth about a post that is ALMOST EIGHT YEARS OLD? Just curious.

rappitysnap 11-02-2008 10:25 AM

just happened to read it now, does it matter if it was 10 years or 10min? thought it was a series of misinformed posts and i had a different opinion on the topic.

Grandbanksmisty 01-03-2009 11:15 PM

41 Coronado
 
Well 10 years or 10 min. I guess I just happen to read this post & darned if the new sailor could be me. My wife & I are looking to buy a sailboat capable of costal crusing our first, as we have been GB owners for many years. We are also looking at a Coronado 41 for size and strength. We have read about Hunters, Ericsons,Newports, Catalinas, Irwin and Columbia Yachts everyone has a good thing to say and seems like a lot of negative comments as well. We just are looking for an honest answer on the structural integrity, safety and sailability of this boat...speed is the LAST item on our list. Most of the boats 10 yrs + old have issues so buying used it is expected to make repairs..this makes the boat your own. Dennis & Terri

roland693 04-05-2009 10:53 AM

Coronado 41
 
I'll not get involved with the pluses and minus of the Coronado 41 here, however, if anyone is interested, please see our website at: S/V M'Lady Kathleen

We outiftted our Coronado 41 ourselves (previous fresh water boat), and have now been four years either on the way, or in the Caribbean. The website has hundreds of Caribbean pictures and tons of text (updated each month).

If anyone has specific questions about a Coronado 41, please feel free to email me directly (Roland693@Hotmail.com). There is virtually no portion of our boat that hasn't been worked on, modified, or improved. No one has worked on our boat except ourselves in the 7 years of ownership.

Best regards,
Roland and Kathleen
S/V M'Lady Kathleen
Coronado 41, 1973, Ser. # 7, built in Portsmouth, VA

P.S. The Coronado 41 uses the identical hull to the Columbia 41 (manufactured in the same plant) and has the same sail plan.

boatpoker 04-07-2009 12:40 PM

We don't see a lot of Coronado's in the Great Lakes and I have only surveyed three Coronado 35's and all three had spent their lives in fresh water. All three had rotten deck core, severly corroded chainplates, severly corroded keel bolts and collapsed mast steps.

I don't think Coronado would make the top of my list

svthefilthywhore 07-27-2010 02:27 AM

I have had a coronado 41 since 2006 and some things are true in my case. while we have found issues such as keel to hull joint issues and a couple of soft spots in the deck, both were maintenance issues that were ignored by the previous owner.

if the previous owner had re-bed the deck hardware in anything but silicone the stanchion bases wouldn't have leaked and got the core wet with fresh water. and if the PO had not let fresh water flood the bilge for about a decade I wouldn't have keel bolt issues. both of the issues I knew about when I purchased the vessel and were obvious.

you may ask "if you knew about those problems, why did you buy it?" because it was a good boat that needed a little bit of work, and she was a good buy for the money.

the truth is that coronado 41s are heavily built vessels that are not considered blue water boats only for the lack of sufficient water and fuel tanks. mine came from the factory with 40g water and 35g fuel. this makes her a coastal cruiser until I replace the original tanks with larger ones which take up all of the wasted space that went unused.
I find the cor-41 to be sea kindly while sailing, but when there is no wind she acts like any other boat with a 50% ballast to displacement ratio, this makes her recover from rolling too quickly, but this makes her more stable while sailing. with canvas up she barely feels chop on the beam and rarely reaches 20 degrees heel. under power with the original perkins 4-108, she moves along at about 6.5-7kts while burning about 1 gal per hour, but if you slow things down a bit to 5-5.5 kts she sips along at about 1/2 gal per hour. under sail she moves along efficiently for a vessel of her tonnage, needing only 10kts of wind to achieve her hull speed on a beam reach. while some may think that she has more windage from her flush deck, the truth is that she has little more windage above the waterline than other designs, the diference is that the height of the cabin is the entire width of the boat, not just in the middle. the rig is well designed with a short stout keel stepped mast supported with over-sized mast-head standing rigging. the shroud chainplates are through-deck type bolted to heavy all glass structural members, and fore and back stays through-bolted to the stem and stern.

while this boat has hull stiffening members, there are very little full height bulkheads, as is seen in modern cruisers. this allows some flexibility in the hull, while maximizing open space.

while turning this vessel into a world cruiser we will need to make several changes; tanks, upgrade steering to hydraulic, install an autopilot alternate power(solar panels) and more. this is comon to find more work than you think in a boat of this age, but as long as you use her you will get the money out of her.

I am happy with my coronado 41 and you will be too


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