J-40 for Long Distance Cruising ? - Page 3 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #21  
Old 12-01-2004
PCP's Avatar
PCP PCP is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Portugal, West Coast
Posts: 16,160
Thanks: 21
Thanked 95 Times in 79 Posts
Rep Power: 10
PCP will become famous soon enough
J-40 for Long Distance Cruising ?

Great forum. I am new here.

I agree with that.
Ocean crossing with a j40 certainly would be fast and uncomfortable, and you would have to travel light, even if the boat has an AVS that gives tranquility.
Not a family boat, or a living aboard, unless you live alone and are a sportsman.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #22  
Old 12-01-2004
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 171
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Paul_L is on a distinguished road
J-40 for Long Distance Cruising ?

I think that''s a pretty impressive feat - you must have been a real tight-wad on the engine use*g* You must not have had to use the engine to charge the batteries much.
What type of wind vane steering did you use? How well did it drive down wind? I assume you had no refrigaration and didn''t use the auto-pilot much?

My J/37 has about 25 gals fuel (close to 290 miles) and currently has a larger holding tank than a fuel tank. I''ve been considering replacing some of the holding tank with a 2nd fuel tank to avoid having tank farms on the deck. Not sure how much fuel I really want to carry.

Paul
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #23  
Old 12-01-2004
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 171
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Paul_L is on a distinguished road
J-40 for Long Distance Cruising ?

Have you ever sailed on a J/40? It isn''t spartan or uncomfortable.

Paul
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #24  
Old 12-01-2004
Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 91
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 11
thorJ30 is on a distinguished road
J-40 for Long Distance Cruising ?

why is it that some folks always seem to generalize fast with uncomfortable.

I would rather miss some clutter on the boat and go full out ( whatever that means) than to sit like a duck with all the crap on board swinging in the waves ...

There are pages of pages very well written stuff in front of that post. And than comes something like this.......

Thorsten
J 30
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #25  
Old 12-02-2004
PCP's Avatar
PCP PCP is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Portugal, West Coast
Posts: 16,160
Thanks: 21
Thanked 95 Times in 79 Posts
Rep Power: 10
PCP will become famous soon enough
J-40 for Long Distance Cruising ?

No, but I have sailed some cruiser-racers that are not very different in shape and performance.
Don''t get me wrong, I like the J40 a lot, and I even would have fun doing a fast and sporty oceancross in it, with a competent crew.
But for cruising with the family it is another matter. I am sure I would have a lot of complaints, cause what is fun for me is (unfortunately) not fun for my family. I am talking not only about not having regularly fresh water baths, but also of a significant heel of the boat, of the fast pounding against the wind, with water flying around, I am talking about taking care alone of those big sails. Yes, like a lot of families, they are there for the sun and the beaches, I am there cause I like to sail, so they sit inside and read or play games, I take care of the boat and a cruiser-racer is not the easiest boat to handle alone, or with a very short crew, in an oceanpassage. It is in that sense that I say that it is uncomfortable.
About the water, my "family crew" wastes 300 liters of the stuff in around 4 days, so even being conservative and cutting that in half, I will need a lot more than the water carrying capacity of a J40, the same with the fuel, if I choose to use a watermaker.

Sorry if I didn''t make myself clear.

Paulo
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #26  
Old 12-02-2004
Jeff_H's Avatar
Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Annapolis, Md
Posts: 6,524
Thanks: 5
Thanked 85 Times in 65 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Jeff_H has a spectacular aura about Jeff_H has a spectacular aura about Jeff_H has a spectacular aura about
J-40 for Long Distance Cruising ?

I think that Paulo''s answer is really in line with the topic as we have been discussing it. Paulo sounds like he understands the needs of his family and given those needs the limited tankage, etc would be a problem. It is exactly to the point that boats like the J-40 are not made for everyone and that they may only make sense for people who are willing to live with some trade-offs for a additional performance.

That said, I am not sure that I agree with all of Paulo''s comments. For example "I am talking about taking care alone of those big sails." Handling a boat like a J-40 should actually be easier than handling a heavier displacement boat. While the J-40 has a lot of sail area for its weight, it does not have a lot of sail area for a 40 footer. A typical, heavier displacement 40 footer would normally have an even larger sail plan than the J- and would not have the high quality sail handling hardware that is typically found on boats like the J-40. J-40''s actually are designed to be great short/single-handers.

The same thing applies to heel angles. While a J-40 with its full racing sail plan is indeed biased towards lighter air performance and so has a lot more sail than would be ideal as windspeeds build, in the big picture the easier driven hull of the J-40 allows it to get by with a smaller sail plan relative to stability when in cruising mode. More specifically the comparatively small need for sail area to over come drag combined with the J-40''s comparatively higher vertical center of buoyancy relative to its comparatively low center of gravity means that the J-40 in cruising mode may actually heel less than a heavier displacement cruiser.

Respectfully,
Jeff
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #27  
Old 12-02-2004
catamount's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Gulf of Maine
Posts: 598
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 12
catamount is on a distinguished road
J-40 for Long Distance Cruising ?

"Yep, I am saying 40 gal for roughly 8000 miles and 9 months worth of cruising. Basically, with the tank holding 30 gallons (roughly 250 mile range), you don''t turn on the engine when you are becalmed on a 2000 mile passage, because it really wouldn''t help anyhow."

In contrast, on our 2003 voyage to Newfoundland and back aboard my father''s Cape Dory 36 (perhaps of similar displacement to the J-40, although not of similar performance), we ran the engine for a total of about 350 hours (over five weeks, that averages about 10 hours per day!) Of course, Radar was a big energy hog, and we were often running the engine as much for power generation as for propulsion. With our longest passage at 750 miles, turning the engine on when we weren''t making as much progress as we''ld like clearly was an option.

The Cape Dory 36 -- which many seem to think of as the quintessential cruising boat --seems like a polar opposite in nearly every aspect to a J Boat....

Myself, I fancy a J-109, but''s unlikely I''ll ever be able to afford one, so instead I''m considering something like a J-35 (not my father''s CD36) for my future voyaging (a possible year-long sabbatical cruise of a North Atlantic Circle, probably single-handed much of the way).

Regards,

Tim
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #28  
Old 12-02-2004
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 171
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Paul_L is on a distinguished road
J-40 for Long Distance Cruising ?

I used to own an Alberg 35, not too distance a cousin from the Cape Dory 36. It was a good boat, but I won''t say it was a comfortable boat. She liked to lay on her rails, needed lots of wind to go and the deck layout and sails were a fair amount of work to run. And yes, we motored a lot. My J/37 is much easier to sail, doesn''t need to lay on its rail to go to weather, and is more comfortable in a big sea than the Alberg. I''m pretty sensitive to getting seasick and have to deal with it for at least 4 or 5 days before I settle in - and even then... I find the Js motion no worse and in a lot of ways more pleasant than the Alberg in the same type of blow.

Paul
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #29  
Old 12-03-2004
PCP's Avatar
PCP PCP is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Portugal, West Coast
Posts: 16,160
Thanks: 21
Thanked 95 Times in 79 Posts
Rep Power: 10
PCP will become famous soon enough
J-40 for Long Distance Cruising ?

After reading Jeff''s reply to my post I was a bit confused. He certainly seemed to know what he was talking about...but it didn''t make sense to me. So I did a little search on the J/boats website, and.. surprise..the only 40 footer I knew from Jboat was called 120, and looks like everybody was talking about the predecessor of the actual j42.
Sorry guys, I was talking about a boat with 13900 pounds to 780sqf of sail, when everybody was talking about a boat with a displacement of 21000p to 733sqf of sail.

Obviously it is not the same thing, not by a long shot.

My only excuse is that I am an European, not very familiarized with the U.S. boats (but wishing to know more). I have to say also, that the designations of the J/boats are very strange: they call the boats by their length, but measure the cruising/racing line in metrical units (dm) and measure the cruising line in feet? That''s misleading at least for me...I haven''t even noticed that they have a cruising line.

Looking now at the right boat, she looks well conservative in weight and sail, by European standards.
My own boat, a 36f cruiser, with 11463p of displacement and 678sqm of sail looks more extreme and I know people that have made several ocean crossings and even a world tour in it.
I would say that the only things that I don''t like in the j40 are the capacity of the fuel and water tanks (for family cruising), otherwise it looks like a great boat to sail anywhere single handed or by a couple.
The j42 looks close in performance and style to the Tartan 4100, one of the boats that I have taken in consideration to substitute my actual boat, in a near or not so near future, and I intend to do long distance cruising.
So it looks like I didn''t know what I was talking about.......

Sorry guys I will be more careful next time.

Paulo
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #30  
Old 12-03-2004
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Posts: 32
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
cditzen is on a distinguished road
J-40 for Long Distance Cruising ?

Hi guys,

a couple of comments on the J-40. She is actually very comfortable (some pics at www.ditzen.com), with a nice interior, etc.. Even in rough seas, I didn''t feel any more uncomfortable than other much heavier boats I''ve been on (e.g. PacCup on a Baltic 42).

In regards to electricity: we used two 120watt adjustable kyocera panels mounted on self-designed lifeline mounts. We had no water maker, no fridge, (no liferaft ;-), a fold-a-boat, and a radar, which we hardly used (it was backstay mounted and didn''t give us much visibility), and then the nav-lights, HAM radio, etc.. The boat came with an alpha below-the-deck AP, which we mated to a nexus control (worked great). For a vane we used the sailomat. Because of the low-power requirements, we were typically fully charged by 11:00am. Only twice did we go into a second night not being fully charged, but we never had to run the engine to generate power. After a while the engine started to run rough, so I adjusted the valves and noticed a small bit of rust on the valve-stems etc.. So we started to run the engine at least once a week.

Now this might seem extremely spartan, but it really didn''t/doesn''t feel that way. I think that as in land-life, one easily falls into the trap that more stuff is better. So we read reviews, articles, and read all the stuff we ''need''. Funny thing is, that when we moved off the boat, we still found stuff we hadn''t touched in over a year.

...Chris

P.S.: maybe not the right place to put this, but here''s my list of the top 5 things we had with us (in order of priority):
1) A flat cut #4 sail. Wow, what a difference it makes, so much less heel, but still great drive.
2) A shy kite, asymmetrical, flown off a pole. 840 sqf instead of 1300 sqf for our full kite. We''d have this puppy up 24 hours a day, fly it through squalls, etc.. No prob. Just square it back and run deeper, and up to 25kn the AP could handle it, with up to 35kn with handsteering. In 15kn costs you 0.5kn boatspeed, but it''s safe in a squall!
3) Dremel tool & cordless drill
4) Windspeed instruments
5) carbon fiber spinny pole (this permitted us to do sail changes, set/take-downs single-handed - great to give your partner time off to sleep).

Things that weren''t worth it:
1) Radar (esp. backstay mounted)
2) electronic charting (we had both paper and electronic for most part, and used paper always, with electronics as backup)
3) Full sized 1.5oz (heavy) kite. When it could stay full in a swell, it was too dangerous to keep up with just the two of us.

Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bluewater defined? dch Learning to Sail 44 07-29-2009 07:20 PM
Cape Fear 38 goduke Boat Review and Purchase Forum 24 06-21-2008 11:30 AM
Bitchin Pardey Cruising Day rogerhjonesjr General Discussion (sailing related) 0 02-09-2004 12:51 PM
buying first boat jerrycooper14 Boat Review and Purchase Forum 21 04-23-2002 02:15 PM
Cruising beginner Seanmc Cruising & Liveaboard Forum 3 01-22-2002 04:39 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:12 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012