Cruising Catamarans Offshore - Page 7 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum
 Not a Member? 


Like Tree1Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #61  
Old 02-25-2005
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 126
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 11
Billpjr is on a distinguished road
Cruising Catamarans Offshore

Eric The Red sailed his 18'' junk rigged homebuilt mono hull across the Atlantic several times. What does that mean? Using examples of boats crossing oceans is a bogus way to prove anything.

Do calculations on windage and see what speeds will kite your multihull and what those same winds do to a monohull. Think about waves that have whitecaps big enough to throw any 50'' boat on it''s beam ends like a pingpong ball. Which boat type will survive being continually pounded with whitecap lips 6'' thick or being tossed on beam ends without capsize or damage. I''ve seen waves like that from the deck of freighters off the east coast USA and they DO exist in ocean sailing. The question is can you stay out of this weather?
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #62  
Old 02-25-2005
PCP's Avatar
PCP PCP is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Portugal, West Coast
Posts: 16,166
Thanks: 21
Thanked 96 Times in 80 Posts
Rep Power: 10
PCP will become famous soon enough
Cruising Catamarans Offshore

Thor, I can not resist. lol!

Here are some more:

http://www.uscg.mil/hq/g-cp/history/Loy/USNI.html

http://www.hawaiiocean.com/HOI_Archives/HOI_2000-06/#Casulaties

http://www.ussailing.org/safety/Rescues/8_5_00.htm

http://abc.net.au/nt/news/200502/s1306679.htm

http://www.amsa.gov.au/about_amsa/Media_releases/2002/2002_jun_3.asp

http://www.freep.com/news/statewire/sw105968_20041020.htm

They include sinking catamarans, all cruiser boats.

I also would like to quote a well known (and responsible) cruiser catamaran manufacturer (good cats) who says in his advertising, to help people choose the right sail boat, about multihull safety:



"Capsize is rare with well sailed cruising multihulls...The important factor, as with a car, is that the degree of risk is up to the driver/skipper. Drive or sail too fast for the conditions and the risk of a crash is higher. The decision is yours. It is not taken away from you by a heavy keel below, making it impossible to go fast. Nobody seriously suggests weighing ...a sailboat ... to limit performance, just because a few may not have the skill or maturity to sail a fast type of craft safely.

Thus, like a car, a multihull has the capability of very high speeds when desired, and the risk factor can consequently be higher.

In general, the risk factor will only begin to increase when boat speed exceeds 15 knots while reaching, or about 8 knots to windward.

Capsize thus must always be considered as a possibility, even if a remote one, and be prepared for. In this regard, there should be a special safety compartment that is accessible from both above and below for storing safety gear that will be immediately available if capsized."




I would say this is common sense and that was precisely what I meant when I said in a previous post:


"Main difference (in my opinion) is that an ocean monohull can take a lot more "errors" made by the skipper and need a lot less attention. The boat can take care of himself (almost) no matter what. With a Cat you have to pay a lot more attention to the wind, to the sail the boat carries, regarding the wind. It is not only the speed that is bigger; everything happens a lot faster in a cat, including capsizing."


Paulo
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #63  
Old 02-26-2005
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2001
Posts: 16
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
dogboater is on a distinguished road
Cruising Catamarans Offshore

Paulo, You can laugh out loud if you want to but your examples are worthless. First we were talking about small CRUISING catamarans for limited offshore use. Not one of your links has any info on what the boat is or what they were doing at the time. As to monos being more forgiving, if you''re in conditions that could put you or your vessel in danger, you better be paying attention. If I''m trying to go fast in conditions that I should be thinking about reefing, I''m really paying attention. Yes, you could probably capsize any cat, but if you''re in a situation where that could happen you better be aware of it or you don''t belong out there! General rule of thumb, cats reef for the lulls, monos reef for the puffs. The naysayers out there all seem to feel that cruising cats flip like a Hobie 16. The Gemini 105 is reported to right itself from 85 degrees, and I believe my 3000 is close to that. We went out fishing in the Gulf Stream on a day of small craft advisories (6~10'' seas) as much to see how the boat liked it as to fish. We saw a few sport fishermen (50'' Vikings) out getting the crap beat out of them. Motorsailing with a small jib only, about 40 degrees to the wind. Very comfortable, nobody sick. My wife has a nice dolphin on so I roll up the jib, slow down and am watching the other poles, My friend is on the stern with the gaff, in the excitement of the moment I get beam too, look over my wife''s shoulder at a breaking about 10 footer. Before I could say anyting to anyone we simply rolled right over it. No one else even noticed! I gained a lot of respect for the seaworthiness of my little boat that day. Another story and then I''m done. Last May We went from Key Largo to Boca Grand on Floridas west coast, about 210 miles. All of April and May 2004 blew like stink out of the east, no one fished, people I know blew out sails, nasty 15~30 seemed like forever. Every mono we saw was motoring or motorsailing with reefed sails. All the cats we saw were sailing. Second day out is a broadreach, reefed main and genny. We''re doing 8~10 kts comfortably in a short steep 4 foot chop. I had to steer as the auto pilot couldn''t keep up and all I could think about was what a handfull a mono would be in these conditions, one broach after another. Four days later we''re headed back beating into the same conditions and pass 2 groups of 25~35 foot monos all motorong or motorsailing in the same conditions we were sailing in while my wife read and our labs slept. We listened to them talking about how horrible it was out and that they''d given up on crossing the stream. Cruising on a cat is so superior to a mono there''s no comparison. I''ll trade the slight possibility of capsize for the comfort, safety and seaworthyness of a cat anyday. Now if the US just had more used boats to pick from.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #64  
Old 02-27-2005
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 210
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
dman is on a distinguished road
Cruising Catamarans Offshore

Billpjr I guess no one has an answer to your question.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #65  
Old 03-03-2005
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 126
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 11
Billpjr is on a distinguished road
Cruising Catamarans Offshore

dman,

Multihulls go faster. In theory they can spend less time in bad weather. In real life, just like Bumfuzzle''s experience (which is major typical and not an exception), they don''t point well enough in anything but silky smooth seas to make the trip shorter.


Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #66  
Old 03-03-2005
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 126
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 11
Billpjr is on a distinguished road
Cruising Catamarans Offshore

dman,

Multihulls go faster. In theory they can spend less time in bad weather. In real life, just like Bumfuzzle''s experience (which is major typical and not an exception), they don''t point well enough in anything but silky smooth seas to make the trip shorter.


Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bluewater defined? dch Learning to Sail 44 07-29-2009 07:20 PM
Cruising Catamarans... IslandParrot Boat Review and Purchase Forum 7 06-09-2006 12:47 AM
Medical courses for offshore cruising Bruceo1 Cruising & Liveaboard Forum 2 09-26-2003 03:45 PM
buying first boat jerrycooper14 Boat Review and Purchase Forum 21 04-23-2002 02:15 PM
Boom brakes on cruising catamarans steven.warren Gear & Maintenance 1 11-29-2000 05:03 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:30 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.