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  #31  
Old 02-19-2005
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IttyKitty is on a distinguished road
Bumfuzzle - who''''s right?

Bumfuzzle is back online. Not sure what happened but happy it is back.
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  #32  
Old 03-03-2005
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WHOOSH is on a distinguished road
Bumfuzzle - who''''s right?

Just a short observation that hasn''t already been made: The easy part of Pat & Ali''s intended Circle is just about finished. Given their limited effort & success in mastering sailing and the complexities of their boat, I''m hopeful that by the time they reach the Coral Coast, they will begin to hear enough about what lies ahead to wonder about the rest of the passage. The Coconut Milk Run is almost over, and there seems good reason to suspect that neither they nor their boat would be suitable for a run around a great southern cape or the Red Sea. They seem like nice kids and not deserving of that kind of ''adventure''.

Jack
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  #33  
Old 04-08-2005
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Bumfuzzle - who''''s right?

I tend to side with the owner on this one.

Firstly, Charter Cats was, to put it very politely, extremely lethargic and sloppy about addressing some serious problems with a very new boat which they had manufactured.

As posted, the chronology of the Charter Cat email responses spans months, it is rife with lack of follow-up, poor internal communication and a seemingly wilful inablility to address the problems in a concise, logical and professional manner. They also seek to excuse their tardiness with bizarre explanations (he hasn''t seen it / our email is down / they''re at a boat show abroad / the exchange rate sucks) - apparently the only one they missed was the dog eating their email server. Though the dog excuse may be their ace in the hole.

Even I, by casually parsing the correspondence, have a pretty good grasp of what the owners are trying to convey:

1. It is a 2 1/2 year old boat which they''ve owned for about a year and a half.

2. It was surveyed in Florida, without defects being discovered at the time of survey which was about 1 year after the manufacture date.

3. Problems became apparent in Panama, and critical in NZ some few months later. So critical that it required repairs in order for them to feel comfortable to continue their voyage.

4. CC apparently has a warranty programme which shouldn''t preclude a second (or third) owner of a fairly new boat from follow-up service. Warranties usually accrue to the product not the owner.

5. And, I don''t recall anything in the owners correspondence suggesting it had been struck by lightening. And presumably, the previous owner would have had an insurance claim if that were the case. Not to mention a bit of charred glass somewhere on the boat.

In my opinion Charter Cats actions should have been first and foremost to be prompt, attentive and timely in their response.

They failed abjectly on that count.

To my thinking, a conscientious builder would have undertaken the following actions:

1. A timely response which identifies the person in the company who will be responsible for following up. And, in this era of email, being at a boat show in Miami or wherever, doesn''t excuse not making a timely response to a customer.

2. Upon ascertaining the location of the vessel, the original surveryors comments and the owners assessment of the problem, Charter Cats should have proposed a course of action. Which, IMHO, would be to nominate a local surveyor (and other experts as required) to inspect the boat.

3. And based upon those findings, a course of remedial works and compensation should be agreed upon. Or not, in which case there''s at least ground work for a negotiated settlement.

In fact, it looks like CC simply pushed the issue to the back burner, despite the owners correspondence - over months - indicating that they needed to proceed with remedial works. When the final bill was tallied, CC seemed to conjure up a lightening strike out of thin air (is if it were ever any other way) as a straw man argument to walk away from the problem. They even "wrote off" their own product for insurance purposes without ever obtaining an independent assessment of the problem - how professional is that?

The owner was naive in not seeking an independent assessment before commencing remedial works - but - as the builder and expert in these matters, CC should have had a very quick and logical response to the owners very valid concerns. And a suggested course of action for the owner to follow.

Instead, CC let events take their course rather than steer their own ship as it were. And their subsequent "lightening strike" theory makes them look like a bunch of weasels. And not terribly clever weasels to boot.

Much has been said concerning the owners inexperience and naivete in regards sailing. But, in my opinion, that is not germain to the issue of a builder refusing to stand behind his product.

Flaws in workmanship happen, but what defines a great boat builder is how they act to rectify their mistakes.

And hands up, how many out there would ever consider buying a Charter Cat after reading this sorry saga?
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  #34  
Old 04-08-2005
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Bumfuzzle - who''''s right?

Not I, If I drop up to a quarter of million dollars on a product I don''t want to hear excuses after asking the same question 10x. Unfortunately the company probably won''t suffer severe sale loss due to this. But they won''t ever see a sale from these pockets ever. To boot I wouldn''t mind stopping by the booth next boat show (maybe Annapolis in Oct) to mention to them that they build a bueatiful looking product to bad they don''t stand behind it. The one thing I couldn''t get over is they do have a waruantee and numerous times they stated well it''s almost 3yrs old? As if the waruantee is pro-rated based on close to the end it is? Unprofessional to say the least.
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  #35  
Old 04-11-2005
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rpack is on a distinguished road
Bumfuzzle - who''''s right?

As someone new to this discussion who is also researching cats, I have a couple of observations.

One, the Bumfuzzles are certainly not risk-averse, which has some appeal for adventure, but I wouldn''t crew for them.

Two, from looking at their most recent posting (engine overheating, which was not detected due to the temp sensor not being connected, thus leading to, at the least, a cracked block if not a completely thrashed engine), it is apparent that they aren''t doing routine inspections or they don''t know what they should be inspecting. The disconnected sensor should have been caught a long time ago. While it might not have prevented the first overheating, it might have prevented it from going to the point of the loss of the engine.

Three, Charter Cats'' response to the hull problem shows us what sort of company they are. While their Jaguar 36 at least caught my eye for consideration, they are now definitely off my short list. If their response to the Bumfuzzles cost them only three sales, assuming a 10% profit on a $300K boat, their unwillingness to do the right thing (which might have cost them $20K), has cost them $90K in profit. Of course, since lots of potential buyers browse the ''net and forums like this, the true costs to the company may end up being much more.

Richard
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  #36  
Old 04-14-2005
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Bumfuzzle - who''''s right?

I''ve also read the logs, and the most recent reports that their engine may need $5,000 in repairs. I''d like to cruise, but I doubt I could plan so much financial latitude into the trip.

At the risk of sounding obvious, I''d be tempted to think the following:

1)Multiple-year cost containment plans may be critical to boat and equipment choice.

2)An older boat, most likely a monohull, with more of a "history" of cruising may be a safer bet that something one year old but untested.

3) Not being able to maintain and field-strip your engine sounds like a recipe for disaster.

4) Having simplier systems (larger, well- maintained tanks instead of a water maker) seems a safer bet in terms of cost containment.

5) Starting with a smaller boat (perhaps with a diesel), for several years of coastal cruising, could be a solid investment in experience.

One last thing I don''t understand-- why the move to larger boats overall for crusing? I understand that living aboard for several years may really lead to the desire for refrigeration, water makers, pressurized hot water showers, better lighting systems, etc. However, it seems like the expense and complexity could really cut into the reasons for being crusing to begin with.
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  #37  
Old 04-14-2005
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Bumfuzzle - who''''s right?

PDX...in answer to your last question about the move to larger boats. Many of us go cruising to enjoy other people and places but have no desire to go "camping". Our boats are our homes and we want to be comfortable and not have to forego "luxuries" like cold drinks, hot showers and even the internet! You are correct in stating that every new complexity costs money and results in more potential breakdowns and we need to weigh each addition to our boats in light of this. We also like to have guests join us so need space for them and storage for our personal items. As bigger boats have become easier to handle shorthanded over the years it has become possible to have all of this and I believe this is one of the resasons so many more people are out cruising today...unlike the dedicated minimalists who led the way years ago and who still populate many anchorages. In short...now there is a choice!
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  #38  
Old 05-27-2005
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Bumfuzzle - who''''s right?

Hi - this is my first post as the weather is too crap to sail today. I can''t believe all the yacking that goes on in this board about their boat!! Me and my wife are also young in our late 20''s and are in the 1st year of our circumnavigation. My wife had never sailed and I have some experience and we have managed. The schionning designed Wildcat is not a bad boat for a circumnavigation and @ 35 ft is a good compromise. All boats are compromises - after all ours is a steel 38 footer bullet proof but slow. The Wildcat has the ability to maintain a higher speed and thus has the ability to avoid storms where as we are forced to run or punch our way through them. I have personally sailed a simular sized cat over the Tasman Sea in 7 metre seas and 55 knots of wind without any problems - we just set the sea anchor and went to bed. I think some of you guys in here need to get a life and actually start a circumnavigation - it takes balls - especially if you are new to the game
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  #39  
Old 05-27-2005
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Bumfuzzle - who''''s right?

Hi - this is my first post as the weather is too crap to sail today. I can''t believe all the yacking that goes on in this board about their boat!! Me and my wife are also young in our late 20''s and are in the 1st year of our circumnavigation. My wife had never sailed and I have some experience and we have managed. The schionning designed Wildcat is not a bad boat for a circumnavigation and @ 35 ft is a good compromise. All boats are compromises - after all ours is a steel 38 footer bullet proof but slow. The Wildcat has the ability to maintain a higher speed and thus has the ability to avoid storms where as we are forced to run or punch our way through them. I have personally sailed a simular sized cat over the Tasman Sea in 7 metre seas and 55 knots of wind without any problems - we just set the sea anchor and went to bed. I think some of you guys in here need to get a life and actually start a circumnavigation - it takes balls - especially if you are new to the game - also we also enjoy our beer and mackers burgers!
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  #40  
Old 05-27-2005
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Bumfuzzle - who''''s right?

Hi - this is my first post as the weather is too crap to sail today. I can''t believe all the yacking that goes on in this board about their boat!! Me and my wife are also young in our late 20''s and are in the 1st year of our circumnavigation. My wife had never sailed and I have some experience and we have managed. The schionning designed Wildcat is not a bad boat for a circumnavigation and @ 35 ft is a good compromise. All boats are compromises - after all ours is a steel 38 footer bullet proof but slow. The Wildcat has the ability to maintain a higher speed and thus has the ability to avoid storms where as we are forced to run or punch our way through them. I have personally sailed a simular sized cat over the Tasman Sea in 7 metre seas and 55 knots of wind without any problems - we just set the sea anchor and went to bed. I think some of you guys in here need to get a life and actually start a circumnavigation - it takes balls - especially if you are new to the game - also we also enjoy our beer and mackers burgers!
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