What concerns do you have when a boat has been out of the water for a long time? - SailNet Community
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post #1 of Old 03-16-2015 Thread Starter
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What concerns do you have when a boat has been out of the water for a long time?

Continue to window shop and learn about hypothetical scenarios.

See listing on sailboatlisting #45198

"1977 Pearson 30. Excellent condition. This boat was dry stored for 17 years by original owner so she is far younger than her vintage.

2009 Main Sail, 2011 155% Genoa, Enginerebuilt in 2010, New fuel tank 2014, new interior 2010, Original Edson Wheel steerng, Original Diesel power."

I'm not sure about excellent condition, is it like with cars where almost no vehicles really qualify for the excellent stamp?

Seems a mid point asking price for the boat and vintage.

Newbie, taking basic keelboat this summer 2015 on Long Island Sound. 42 year old father of 3

Last edited by DRFerron; 03-16-2015 at 08:50 PM. Reason: Added URL
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post #2 of Old 03-16-2015
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Re: What concerns do you have when a boat has been out of the water for a long time?

It sounds like they had her in dry storage during the off season, not that the boat has been in storage for 17 years and not put in the water if that's what you're thinking. Our marina offers storage indoors (more expensive) for boats up to a certain size, or if the mast comes down each year (for whatever reason they choose to do that).

It's almost impossible to judge a boat by a listing like that. I may be wrong, but the picture looks like it could be the brochure pic. There really is no substitute for boarding and looking in person. What the current owner, who wants to sell, may see as "excellent" because he put his sweat and dollars in it, could be a piece of crap in reality. It's subjective.

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post #3 of Old 03-16-2015
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Re: What concerns do you have when a boat has been out of the water for a long time?

As Donna said their is no substitute for a physical inspection. So many things can go wrong even just sitting in a garage. Damage to wires from rodents. Water could have frozen and damaged just about anything. Rot and mold continue regardless.

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Re: What concerns do you have when a boat has been out of the water for a long time?

It could be a jewel or a constant headache. I wouldn't make any assumptions about which it is, and would examine it and survey it the same as any other boat. A good, thorough survey and engine analysis should disclose it's strengths and flaws. The lack of use means it's likely to have fewer hours on the engine and transmission, but, by the same token, machinery can also be damaged by disuse.
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Re: What concerns do you have when a boat has been out of the water for a long time?

Sometimes boats are not well supported during dry storage resulting in deformation of the hull and/or deck and delamination of the hull and even bulkheads. If not stored indoors then water intrusion through deck fittings can reek havoc throughout the boat.
Neglect destroys more boats than frequent regular use ever will. 17 years on the hard is not much of an endorsement and recommissioning costs could be significant.
Also, remember GPS was a very new and not widely used in the recreational world, so pretty much all electronics on a boat like this are pretty much historical.
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Re: What concerns do you have when a boat has been out of the water for a long time?

Boat looks nice and clean, well kept. I read that it was stored for 17 years a while ago (by original owner). Recent work means that it was in good use recently. Good price and worth taking a close look. Newish sails means they should be good for a few more years, most likely.

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Re: What concerns do you have when a boat has been out of the water for a long time?

Gave me good things to think about.

I like the idea of asking about the effect of laying up and hull deformation. Thanks

Newbie, taking basic keelboat this summer 2015 on Long Island Sound. 42 year old father of 3
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Re: What concerns do you have when a boat has been out of the water for a long time?

If it it too dry, wood can shrink causing tabbing (structural or furniture) to crack away from the wood or the hull. Just a visual inspection item.

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Re: What concerns do you have when a boat has been out of the water for a long time?

If it was sitting idle in the garage, there are chances of many things going wrong for the boat. Especially i the garage is not properly insulated or ventilated the climate and humidity may ruin the wooden structure of the boat. And it is exactly due to these reasons that I have stored mine at Migson Public Storage as they also offer boat storage service. My boat stays with them during the long winters at Brampton. They will ensure that the boat is not affected by the extreme climate variations, temperatures or humidity.
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Re: What concerns do you have when a boat has been out of the water for a long time?

Many great posts here indicated that these listings don't necessarily mean the boats been on hard for many years. If it has, run away. Here's some examples of what goes wrong:

1. Anything with a gasket in it or rubber in it has dried out and likely failed. Plenty to choose from here, engine, pumps, hoses, head, etc.
2. Bedding material has dried out and failed. Everything attached to the deck is leaking.
3. Engine internals may have rusted. Engines like to run and have lubricant spread around. The engine might be damaged or frozen and unrecoverable.
4. As pointed out, all the electronics and electrical stuff is old, if anything is wrong with any of it will be hard to get it fixed, find replacement parts, you'll be replacing (although this is true pretty quickly anyway today).
5. All the auxiliary stuff you tend to get with a used boat will be trash. Life jackets rotted, spare parts and tools rusted, etc.
6. Seacocks will be frozen. If they are old style, maybe you can take them apart and grease, if not might be necessary to replace.

..............

Boats do best when they are run regularly, and when things break they are fixed. And everything breaks. The cheap part is buying the boat. The expensive part is operating costs.

Material costs for a boat is death by a thousand cuts. The value is in everything from winches, to pumps, to rigging, to lines, to electrical, motor, hull...everything. $1000 here, $1000 there, after a while it adds up to real money. Never mind the labor associated with replacing any of this stuff unless you do it yourself.

IMHO, buy a good boat, used regularly, by a meticulous owner. Bargain hunting as a first time boat buyer will more often lead to false economies. There are exceptions to this rule, people who are really good at fixing things themselves and have lots of time on their hands to do it. It seems like a good idea until the first time you try to pull a hose off a thru hull fitting that's mounted away in a locker someplace where you need to be a contortionist to fit.
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