what's the very first thing to do? - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 08-03-2006
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 1
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
skinjohn is on a distinguished road
what's the very first thing to do?

for an ABSOLUTE beginner...who's been on ski boats for years, but was a guest on a sailboat only once...

what is the very first step to sailing? what little boat do i rent for the first try on my own?
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 08-03-2006
TrueBlue's Avatar
Seńor Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Narragansett Bay
Posts: 4,853
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 12
TrueBlue is a jewel in the rough TrueBlue is a jewel in the rough TrueBlue is a jewel in the rough
Around these parts, I think many sailors started out on fun, but wet boats, such as Sunfish and Lasers. Graduating to the next level will then become easier.
__________________
True Blue . . .
sold the Nauticat
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 08-03-2006
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 526
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 12
SailinJay is on a distinguished road
The very first step might be to get some type of instruction, either from a person who already knows how to sail or through an ASA beginner course. If you have no idea what to do, even on a very small boat, you can get very frustrated and you will get very wet. If you have some sense of wind direction and its affect on the sails, you could give it a go on your own.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 08-03-2006
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: full time cruiser
Posts: 155
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 11
chuck5499 is on a distinguished road
skinjohn -- welcome to the great world of sailing -- you may find that it is for you or not. Not sure where you are located but to find out if you really like sailing try taking the ASA (american sailing association) 101 sailing class. it is 2 days and really gives you the basics of sailing. If you like that go out with a friend or two and then take 2 more classes from asa and then you can bareboat charter --
I did not start small - i was 55 when i took up sailing and took the courses and chartered and then bought a 40' boat.
good luck and welcome to greatest time on earth
chuck and soulmates
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 08-03-2006
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 9 Times in 9 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
It might be worth crewing first for a while, until you start to get a feel for the sport and that way you have some more knowledgeable people around to ask the typical newbie questions. I'd also recommend getting a good basic Learn to Sail book, like Seidman's The Complete Sailor.

I would also recommend the ASA 101 course after getting some time in on the water and reading a bit in a basic book.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 08-03-2006
duffer1960's Avatar
Catalina 38 Avantura
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: Michigan
Posts: 208
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 14
duffer1960 is on a distinguished road
Get a Sunfish and get wet! That's probably the best way.
About the only thing to remember is you can't sail directly into the wind, only on about a 45 degree angle into it. If you are at point A, and want to sail to point B, and point B is directly into the wind, then you have to tack to get there. No, not stick a nail through your toe so you don't fall out when the boat heels (leans over), but sail a zig-zag coarse toward point B with each leg of your course almost 45 degrees into the wind.
That's it! Now go out and buy a Sunfish and a good PFD (lifejacket) and go mess around, get wet, tip over (they are VERY easy to right back up), and have a blast! What I always tell people is, about the worst thing that can happen if you tip over a Sunfish is you will get wet.
That's how I learned, no formal sailing classes, and I now sail a 38 footer.
__________________
Sincerely,
Russ Duff
Catalina 38, Hull #112
"AVANTURA"
Lake Erie
Grosse Ile, Michigan
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 08-03-2006
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 9 Times in 9 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
BTW, if you're going to go learn on a dinghy, get a good foam PFD, rather than an inflatable. The inflatables are usually more comfortable, but most will trigger rather unexpectedly on a dinghy.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 08-03-2006
Jeff_H's Avatar
Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Annapolis, Md
Posts: 6,538
Thanks: 5
Thanked 85 Times in 65 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Jeff_H has a spectacular aura about Jeff_H has a spectacular aura about Jeff_H has a spectacular aura about
I would say that there isn't just one good way to start, but many. For some, the answer is get and read through a good book on sailing (I usually recommend "Basic Keelboat" which is US Sailings manual, and "Sailing for Dummies" by by JJ and Peter Isler which is actually the more thorough of the two), sail a couple times with friends and don't be afraid to ask questions. And then either rent or buy a small boat and sail the living daylights out of it.

If you are reasonably agile, and can sail on reasonably protected waters with reasonably reliable winds, then I would suggest that you look for a small dinghy, ideally one that is popular in your area and perhaps a bit more modern than a sailfish so that you won't out grow it too soon.

If you are not all that agile, or you are not sailing on a protected body of water with reliable winds, then I suggest that you try to buy a used, 22 to 28 foot, fin keel, spade rudder, moderately light weight sloop which should be responsive enough for you to develop boat handling and sail trimming skills.

You may only own this boat for a short time so try to buy one that is in reasonably good shape, but not perfect, and that is common in your area.

As you start spending time on the water, you will start to develop some skills and a whole lot of questions. Continue reading and asking questions.

Now then, there are people who who have trouble learning something that is as complex as sailing. Having taught a lot of people to sail in my life, there is something about having a few lessons to help walk you through the basics. Having spoken to a number of people who have taken both the ASA and the US Sailing courses, it would appear that the US Sailing courses are a bit more detailed. For some that meant information overload and for others it meant a better value for the dollar.

However, you get your 'fundamentals' there is nothing like simply getting out there and doing to build skills.

If you are not in a position to actually own a boat, then I suggest that perhaps try to get aboard a race boat. Racing crews rarely have a lot of time to teach you what to do during a manuever, but you can probably a position as a grinder and rail meat, which will give you a chance to watch things first hand and ask questions between tacks and jibes. Just eb aware that when people are quiet they may be concentrating on wind patterns or the competition, and ask "Is this an okay time to ask a question? before blurting out what is on your mind.

Good Luck,
Jeff
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 08-03-2006
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 3
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Rabnet is on a distinguished road
If you are near an area that has a community sailing center they usually have great beginner programs and boats to learn on as well.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 08-03-2006
hellosailor's Avatar
Plausible Deniability
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 10,432
Thanks: 1
Thanked 75 Times in 73 Posts
Rep Power: 10
hellosailor has a spectacular aura about hellosailor has a spectacular aura about
First step is probably an ASA-member sailing school or an indy with an equally good reputation. Reading can be good, or frustrating because sailing is very much a physical experience with feedback to the whole body, it doesn't translate into books or computer simulator games very well.

Odds are the classes will give you some books to read that match the course material and integrate it nicely, and it is always easier to learn the right way, rather than UNlearn what you've picked up, and then learn to do it right.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Beneteau vs Hunter SEC Boat Review and Purchase Forum 45 08-04-2011 05:44 PM
Catlina 40 flysurfer Boat Review and Purchase Forum 13 05-04-2006 08:35 PM
Can someone identify this thing? gwp Gear & Maintenance 7 07-26-2003 03:30 PM
New to crewing... Is it an everyday thing? 808state Crew Wanted/Available 2 04-11-2003 03:54 PM
A new catalina 36? paul-e Boat Review and Purchase Forum 32 09-21-2001 05:26 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:25 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.