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  #21  
Old 08-11-2006
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2 heads

This does bring up the old adage that 2 heads are better than one.

Well, only for the privacy issue, really, for when my girlfriend and I have a guest couple staying on for a few nights. Is this usually an issue?
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  #22  
Old 08-11-2006
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No. We lived aboard: me, wife, 1 child, and 2 dogs and weathered all kinds of familly and even rode out a hurricane on it - which prevents the use of ANY other facilities.

I would take one nice head over two mediocre heads any day... especially just being you. Look for yourself at the space lost on the second head. most of the cruisers I know that have a second just throw their junk in there.

If you are concerened about emergencies, carry a full back-up pump (I always did), and for about 20 bucks you can have a really nice bucket with toilet seat that can double for a basin to wash your boat!!! Remember, this is emergency.

Heads do breakm especially electric. However, it is not that "often". I lost mine because of a matchbox car in the macerator... a sound that makes a child giggle and a father gasp!!!! As far as your guests go, just tell them not to put anything in the head they have not eaten first... which includes matchbox cars.

One head. My opinion.
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  #23  
Old 08-11-2006
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By the way, I did not mean to come off too strong in the beginning. If you read back to things I have written, I pretty much like to joke.

Bottom line is there really aren't bad boats, just different boats. Find the one that is the most comfortable for you and it is the Right boat.

Fair winds...

Brian
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  #24  
Old 08-11-2006
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I'd avoid the early Tayanas...as they had serious quality control issues IMHO.

I'd also agree that too many people get too much boat, and end up regretting it, rather than too little boat. If you don't have a dedicated crew, then getting a boat that large may make it very difficult for you to get much sailing in at all. Also, most of your costs are higher with a larger boat—from dockage, marina fees, hauling, maintenance, cost of equipment, etc.

I'd also agree with Cruisingdad on the single good head being better than two mediocre heads... and that the loss of space due to two heads is definitely an issue on a smaller boat, especially the smaller size boat I'd be recommending.

If you were to ask me, I'd say go for a boat about 32-35' rather than a 37' boat. They're far easier to single hand, and will cost far less and be less costly to own and maintain. There are plenty of boats, in that range that are fairly good for living aboard, and also make excellent bluewater passagemakers.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
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  #25  
Old 08-11-2006
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SD & Camarderie,

Didn't Taiwanese boats have problems with a lot of the SS? A lot of those have Iron fuel tanks too that if not propersly maintained over the years will develop leaks. Camarderie... thoughts? I have seen a few Tayanas where the SS looks like it came off the bottom of the ocean. US mfg boats typically have a higher grade of SS, right????

Need some "Taiwan" owners thoughts...
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The early Chinese-built boats had problems in many areas. Some were primarily chopper gun fiberglass mat, rather than cloth or roving. Others had problems with stainless steel quality. Some had fuel tank issues. Some had problems with their deck lamination and coring. Many also had problems with teak decking and leaks into the deck core.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #27  
Old 08-11-2006
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35'

Okay, per your suggestion about less than more, that would lead me to a Tartan 3500, most likely.

Would you all circumnavigate in a 35'?
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Old 08-11-2006
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We too are looking for a boat

Very interesting thread.

Have a Westsail 32 for 30 years+, use it a lot. Only 1 head, had to replace it once. Its a bit like provisioning, other people eat (and buy heads) as well, why take along so much in food and spares.

We are just retiring and looking at buying another boat on the southern east or west coast. Cruisingdad, I love your blunt remarks. We planned 30 years ago to go offshore and bought our Wetsnail, we love her to death. Now that we are thinking of going offshore for a long period, up pops Dockwise and similar shippers. This will allow us to buy our dream cruiser and not have to equip her for offshore or watch the 20 foot cresting waves. When we want to move on, if we like her we ship her, if we don't we sell here and buy elswhere.

Now all we have to do is find the right boat, this opens up all sorts of manufacturers (and brokers you can trust!)

I didn't think chosing a boat would be so hard.

Good sailing everyone.
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  #29  
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RogRoderg2,

Buying a boat is not hard... deciding is the hard part. Here is how you do it, since you are married:

Go out and research thousands of vessels and do all of your homework. Plan and extrapolate all kinds of data. A chart with highly numerical and mathimatical computations is really the best. This process will takes countless hours of research and agony and talking to guys like me and Sailingdog, camaraderie, and Surfesq, and the brokers and the like.

After that is all over, present the data to your wife and let her go pick out the boat she was going to buy in the first place. Marraige saved and you get a new boat. Consider all that other research a good lesson in who is really the boss, Captain......
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  #30  
Old 08-11-2006
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Lets talk West coast specific. 2000 miles of a lee shore. You will want deep draft. I also think a smaller boat will make more sense. First time boat buyers usually want a boat that is too big. I know people that live aboard 30 footers in comfort. Smaller boats have smaller sails, are easier to maneuver and have lower maintenance costs. Good luck with finding that live aboard slip BTW. Going North along the CA coast generally means pounding into 10 foot seas or more. So CA is usually light winds, so a lighter boat with deep fin and large sail plan will mean you can sail while the heavy full keelers are motoring. Try to avoid overly beamy boats. Avoid exterior teak as much as possible. There will be arguments about this, but if you want to go sailing and not work on the boat keep it as simple as possible.

Heads? Don't really care. You can always use the extra as a wet locker. But maintenance will be higher.
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