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  #11  
Old 08-22-2006
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I have never heard that the Whitby 42 has screwed together decks. I recommended them based on my experience with the robustness of my Dad's Brewer 12.8 (a derivative of the Whitby. which has a bolted hull top deck joint)and from several owners that I have gotten to know over the years who have done circumnavs in Whitby's.

Many of not most Cabos still have teak decks. While I personally would not buy a boat with teak decks, I'm not buying this boat and Livia, who is actually buying this boat, is considering other boats with teak decks.

While my comments on old fiberglass, and blisters reflect my understanding of these items and clearly point at the downside of these elements, I hoped I also pointed out that we each decide what is important to each of us, and that old glass or former blisters are realities to bare in mind, but for most of us it was not a deal breaker.

Jeff
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  #12  
Old 08-22-2006
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This has all been extremely helpful so far and thanks to everyone who took the time and energy to respond. We've been reading the forum regularly as posts come in and doing a lot of talking. I'm sure we'll have a bunch of follow up questions and definitely still look forward to hearing anyone else's opinions.
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  #13  
Old 08-22-2006
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Dave... Fully understand...was just tweaking you a bit ...your knowledge of boats is amazing and I respect your opinions...Didn't want you to take my comments as criticism. Apologis if they came across that way.
As to the Whitby...I am familiar with this boat as they were on our "short list" some years ago and are indeed nice, seaworthy boats IF you get one where the joints were bolted. Apparently the earlier ones were screwed and this is one of the things prospective buyers should look out for IMHO.
Probably lots of the screwed ones have made circumnavs too, but I'd be wary of such construction.
All best...Cam
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  #14  
Old 08-22-2006
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Cam,

I agree with you about avoiding screwed (vs bolted) hull to deck joints for offshore work. There is a tendancy for these to work and eventually progressively loosen the fastenings. Once that happenes even a small breech can expand rapidly in extreme conditions.

Jeff
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  #15  
Old 08-22-2006
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OK - first question

There are a few Valiant 40s on the market at 90K such as this one:

http://www.boats.com/listing/boat_de...ityid=12250111

We are taking to heart your advice about having a good refitting and repair budget, but we might be able to swing a boat similar to this and still able to have a solid reserve. Our first question to the sellers of course would be the blister issue, but if that isn't a problem with this hull - and assuming a good survey - this seems to be in our budget and a fit for our sailing goals (and tastes). Am I crazy?

Thanks again. We looked at a bunch of the suggested boats and there were some really good other boats to consider. We hadn't had the Morgan cross our radar and still have to look into it. Some of the others, although good boats, we ruled out for other reasons (ketch, lack of boats of that type on the market, etc).
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Old 08-25-2006
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Camaraderie

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Now on to sailing fool... that is in IDIOTIC response about one of the most revered and recommended Robert Perry designs for bluewater cruising on a budget. On that basis you'd also be rejecting Passport, Mason, Taswell and many other fine boats that make your C&C look like a toy! A LITTLE knowledge is a dangerous thing! "

I have to say your comments lack any spirit of camaraderie. That you may rever the Tayana is fine your you. Some folks rever Westsails and others rever Concordias...I guess to each their own. All these boats had their days, and reasons to admire them. However, those characteristics that made them special in their day dont' necessarily make them good candidates for new sailors looking today for first time offshore boats.

Teak decks, encapsulated keels, steel keels and old Taiwan boats are all subjects that have had extensive discussion threads on this board. You may not consider all of issues, or any one of them, a toss-out reason in choosing a boat, but you miss the boat in calling someone who does an idiot.

I owned quite a few different boats in the twenty-five years since I sold that C&C, I'd say your ad hominem response suggests a lack of other material to work with.
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Old 08-25-2006
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My response wasn't given in the spirit of camaraderie. It stands as written. Oh...and if you don't want ad hominem attacks...you should change your posting name...it's just too easy!
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  #18  
Old 08-27-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Livia
Our first question to the sellers of course would be the blister issue, but if that isn't a problem with this hull - and assuming a good survey - this seems to be in our budget and a fit for our sailing goals (and tastes). Am I crazy?
I've been considering Valiant 40s from that time period, but the blister issue is one that can be hard to accomodate.

For example, I was on a Valiant 32 that had the small blisters on both the decks and the hull. They were pretty obvious, and most likely cosmetic, but they also seemed to pose two questions in the future. First, resale value. Second, what if they become worse.

It would be one thing if the "cosmetic blisters" were simply that, but that wouldn't necessarily explain why a fair number of Valiant 40 owners have done full peel jobs on their boats. I've seen Valiant 40s listed for around $115 that had extensive peel jobs. There's one listed now for $140k that had a full, factory done refinish job.

So, it's just a concern. One may pick up a Valiant 40 with minor blisters and use it for years with no problems and then sell it for a reasonable price, but it's worth noting that other owners have been through extensive restoration jobs. Also, if not done correctly, the restoration work can be worse than letting the blisters stay. I've been on a boat (not a Valiant) with blister problems even though it had been peeled and restored two years before. Ugh!

Jim H
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  #19  
Old 01-22-2007
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Update

I wanted to update those who helped last Fall. Thanks again for your help and I am certain to be reading this site more regularly now.

We ended up hiring a consultant and getting hooked up with some excellent advisors (fodder for another post).

The end result is that my fiance (another development in our tale) and I are closing on a Wauquiez Pretorien 35 in the Pacific NW this week. After closing we are taking a 5 day course on her and moving her to Victoria BC.
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Old 01-22-2007
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Livia-

Congratulations... I hope you got a survey on the boat.
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