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Old 08-27-2006
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how does displacement relate to the towing

I am going from a 1800 displacement sailboat to a 4200 displacement sailboat. How do I determine the towing weight including boat,trailer and typical gear. Also what would be the correct size boat lift for such a displacement as 4200. Maybe my Tundra won't pull such a load.
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Old 08-27-2006
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It would help a lot if you said what kind (make/model) of sailboat you are going to be getting. That is a bit more helpful, as someone on the site might have one, and you'd probably get much better feedback. Saying a 4200 displacement sailboat is meaningless. Do you mean a boat that weighs 4200 lb. sailboat, or weighs 4200 kg., or a boat that displaces 4200 lbs.. Displacement is often a measurement of volume, not weight.
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Old 08-27-2006
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Displacement is often used as a measure of the size of ships. The displacement of a vessel is defined as the weight of the amount of water it displaces when afloat.
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boat type

The boat I am working on buying is a 1975 Columbia 26 with a displacement of 4200. Since that number is apparently the weight of the water this boat displaces, is that also the actual boat weight and if I add that to the trailer weight would that be the towing weight? I'm concerned about being able to tow it with my Tundra.
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I don't see a Columbia 26 that displaces 4200 lbs. Which model do you have? The Columbia T26, which is listed as trailerable, displaces 4400 lbs. according to the Columbia site.

That is probably not the full displacement of the boat...as it probably doesn't include the weight of the sails and some of the other things that may be on the boat...fuel, water, food, gear, etc. I'd imagine that the trailer is at least 1300 lbs, based on the fact that my trailer is for a lighter boat, and weighs 1200 lbs.

That would put the total towing weight up around 5700 lbs...so I would guess that you'd probably want a vehicle capable of towing 6000 lbs. at a minimum.

According to Toyota's website, the V8 Tundra can tow up to 7000 lbs... so if you have a V8 Tundra and a class IV hitch, you're probably okay. If you have the V6, which has a towing limit of 5000 lbs... You're screwed.
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Old 08-28-2006
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I have Columbia 26 Mk II -it's the one with the blister cabin- and its haul out weight is 7900 lbs granted I live aboard so its probably heavier than yours but not 3700 lbs worth
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The Columbia 26 Mk II is listed at a displacement of 5900, so it starts out 1500 lbs. heavier than the Columbia T26.

As I said above, I don't believe that the displacements on the Columbia specifications are for fully loaded for cruising boats, which will add at least 1500 lbs. or so per person. At least that is the figure that my experience has said is about average for each person.

Liveaboards are usually a bit heavier, so call it 2000 lbs. and that would put it in the ball park, especially given that the Columbia specs seem to be for the unloaded, empty, unequipped boat—so the difference will probably be about 3500 lbs, rather than 3700 lbs.

Mind you, I'm guessing based on the specifications from the website I posted above.

One other note on displacement—according to the USCG, for documentation purposes, my boat displaces five net tons. It weighs less than two. Many catamarans I know of have a displacement, at least according to the USCG, which is far more than they actually weigh. The actual displacement of a vessel, if you could measure it accurately, would give you the vessels weight, as it is the amount of water that is displaced by a volume of water equal to the weight of the boat—unless the boat has sunk, in which case, the displacement is not accurate.
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Old 08-28-2006
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Fyi

From the USCG FAQ located here

http://www.uscg.mil/hq/msc/T3/t3faqs.htm#top


1. Is gross or net tonnage the same as weight?
Response: No. Gross and net tonnage are parameters used to describe the size of a vessel in terms of its volume, not weight. Generally speaking, there is no correlation between the weight of a vessel and the gross or net tonnage assigned to that vessel
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sidiag
From the USCG FAQ located here

http://www.uscg.mil/hq/msc/T3/t3faqs.htm#top


1. Is gross or net tonnage the same as weight?
Response: No. Gross and net tonnage are parameters used to describe the size of a vessel in terms of its volume, not weight. Generally speaking, there is no correlation between the weight of a vessel and the gross or net tonnage assigned to that vessel
Never said they were the same... that's why I made the distinction between displacement and weight. However, if you were to take the same volume of water a boat displaces, it would weigh the same as the boat itself—that's the definition of displacement, from physics—not the USCG definition.
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Old 08-28-2006
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A point to consider whenever discussing vessel displacement, is whether the water displaced is freshwater or seawater. If the boat displaces 4200 lbs in freshwater (62 lbs/cf), it's displacement in seawater (64 lbs/cf) will be 4335 lbs.
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