CenterCockpit - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 09-07-2006
bayouelton's Avatar
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Ocean Springs MS
Posts: 16
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
bayouelton is on a distinguished road
Send a message via AIM to bayouelton
Talking CenterCockpit

Just a couple'a general questions inspired by this forum:

1) what are some of the plusses or minuses of a center cockpit versus one that's aft

2) so just what is wrong with a main mast type sail roller furling after all? (as opposed to the old fashioned type that pulls straight up)


Any inputs appreciated. I know they're probably boring questions for the older salty dogs here but at least I'm not asking for a free boat like bigdreamthinwallet.

p.s. - be careful if you check the jerryrlitton profile. I was wondering what kind of dorky outfit he flew for so I clicked on his profile. My computer locked up by coincidence at the same time and I almost had a heart attack.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 09-07-2006
camaraderie's Avatar
moderate?
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: East Coast
Posts: 13,877
Thanks: 0
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 15
camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough
As a center cockpit fan...I'd say that the drawbacks are:
Harder to come into the dock and handle aft lines.
Tend to be condo-ish in terms of looks until you get into the 40+ foot range. More windage at anchor. Some say more "rolly" as you sit higher but I have not found this to be true.
Tend to have less on deck storage.
More difficult to fit wind-vane self steering.

On the plus side:
You get a nice large aft cabin and privacy aboard.
Steering is easier as you have a higher mid-cockpit view...boat seems shorter!
You can have a nice enclosed sun room.
You don't get pooped at sea as often.

2. In MAST roller furling is easy and fun to use but drawbacks are poorer sail shape and speed due to lack of battens, additional weight aloft which increases the roll of the boat and the big one for me...if it jams...you have to go up the mast to free it regardless of the conditions.
In BOOM furling has none of these drawbacks but is significantly more expensive. Other options for mainsail handling include...lazy jacks, Dutchman System and Stack Pack which are all much more affordable.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 09-07-2006
bayouelton's Avatar
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Ocean Springs MS
Posts: 16
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
bayouelton is on a distinguished road
Send a message via AIM to bayouelton
Thanks for your advice, camaraderie, and I knew I had a 3rd question on the tip of my tongue. Just curious, since I saw some nice ones in San Francisco Bay on my last trip -
3) how come Catamarans aren't any more popular than they are? They seem to be so much more stable.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 09-07-2006
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Main problem with catamarans is their beam makes it very hard to find marina slips at a reasonable price. Most of the larger 35'+ Cats take up two slips due to their beam.

If you're planning on going on bluewater passages, center cockpit boats can also be more difficult to add a wind vane to.

The other problem with in-mast furling, if you have the sail reefed, and something happens, where you need to drop the sail, you'll have to unfurl it before you can drop the sail.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 09-07-2006
Faster's Avatar
Just another Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: New Westminster, BC
Posts: 15,005
Thanks: 81
Thanked 223 Times in 215 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Faster has a spectacular aura about Faster has a spectacular aura about Faster has a spectacular aura about
Ditto the comment on overall length and center cockpits. Most CC boats under 40+ feet tend to have what room they have chopped up into smaller spaces. As to the privacy issue, I think privacy on any boat under 60 feet is an illusion.

In mast furled mainsails suffer all the abovementioned problems. The lack of roach costs sail area and reduces drive and pointing ability. Since many boats with inmast furling aren't upwind rockets as it is, giving up more pointing ability doesn't make much sense.

With newer boats being supplied with at least one powered halyard winch these days, I'd like to think that inmast furling would fade away.

The moorage issue with multihulls is very real, not only for permanent moorage but also for transient moorage in the busy times of the year. Some marinas have been known to charge double their already extortional daily summer rates for cats and tris.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 09-10-2006
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Quote:
Originally Posted by Faster
The moorage issue with multihulls is very real, not only for permanent moorage but also for transient moorage in the busy times of the year. Some marinas have been known to charge double their already extortional daily summer rates for cats and tris.
Of course, this doesn't really apply to some of the folding trimarans, like the Corsairs, Contours, Telstars, Dragonflys, and such.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 09-11-2006
camaraderie's Avatar
moderate?
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: East Coast
Posts: 13,877
Thanks: 0
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 15
camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough
Catamarans also don't sail to windward and tack as easily as monohulls and when they go over...they don't turn back up. The catamarans that went through Ivan with us were all turned over...they acted like bit kites as the wind got under their bows. At sea...many designs tend to get slapped underneath by moderate sized waves and this make for an uncomfortable ride.
On the plus side...they provide wonderful living room and a stable sailing platform and shoal draft so they are becoming increasingly popular in the islands where all of these things are important and the at sea performance is less of a concern.
I know I would never own one...but friends that do, would never go back to a monohull, so it is largely a matter of personal preference as long as you have your eyes wide open about the +/- of each type of boat.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 09-11-2006
bayouelton's Avatar
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Ocean Springs MS
Posts: 16
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
bayouelton is on a distinguished road
Send a message via AIM to bayouelton
Thanks everybody! I can't put a price tag on the advice I'm getting here. I saw another interesting sight in Stockton, CA, if anyone would like to comment on that. It was a 32' Westsail in drydock being worked on by it's owners. It had a full-length bottom type keel that ran the entire length of the boat. I can't remember ever seeing a keel like that. Anyway, the owner said they were the best 32 foot sailboats ever made (what else would he say) and said I could pick one up for about $50K. What say you?

Last edited by bayouelton; 09-11-2006 at 10:19 PM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 09-11-2006
Gene T's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Left Coast USA
Posts: 666
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
Gene T is on a distinguished road
Multihulls are more stable upside down than they are right side up, but they don't tend to sink like monohulls do. Monohulls might come back up after being turned over, it depends on the righting moment of the design, how much weight has been added and whether the hatches were closed prior to being turned over. Catamarans don't tend to go upwind as well as monohulls, but maybe as good or better than a full keel heavy cruising mono. You can't add as much weight on a multi as you can a mono unless it is large, like over 45 feet.

As far as someone telling you the own the best sailboat ever built.......Walk the dock and ask boat owners how they like their boats. You will see a trend.

Last edited by Gene T; 09-11-2006 at 12:38 PM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 09-11-2006
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Camaraderie-

Just remember that monohull sailboats are about the only boats that can self-right themselves, provided they do not sink due to the water they take on before righting themselves.

Commercial fishing boats, passenger ferries, most power boats, and even most naval vessels can not self-right from a capsize. That's a moot point most of the time. Your other points about the lack of windward and problems tacking are true for many cats,, as are problems with bridgedeck slapping. However, some catamarans, when properly sailed and loaded, can out sail monohulls of equal length with ease.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
centercockpit /cruiser need opinions jsantos Boat Review and Purchase Forum 8 10-01-2002 07:21 AM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:57 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.