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  #141  
Old 06-12-2009
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Mac 26x website

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gmalarkey View Post
It was an extensive (very extensive) article, written by a gentleman that used his 26X as a blue water cruiser, had for years and wouldn't trade it for anything.
You are probably thinking of this site:

Cruising Log of the Murrelet

I would take some of his analysis with a grain of salt, however. I find the idea of the Mac 26x and 26m to be really good -- sail when you want to sail, motor when you need to go fast or there is no wind, trailer it home to avoid split fees.

That having been said, I am not sure I would want to be in one when the winds were high or the seas large. The manufacturer site claims you can sail them in gale force winds, and even has a video up:

http://www.macgregor26.com/index/gale_2_minutes.htm

...but to me their hull form looks round and not too sea kindly, and in big winds and waves its nice to have several thousand pounds of lead sticking down below the boat (as opposed to water ballast which is, well, the same density as the ocean). For light wind as well, the sailplan is significantly smaller than a similar sized sailboat (I assume you just cut on the engine at that point).

If I didn't go into open water, for example if I was only sailing around SF bay and never going out the gate I think the Mac 26M would be ideal -- and since I *don't* go out the gate very often the boats have alot of appeal.

Regards,

Joe
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  #142  
Old 06-12-2009
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Was looking around on that website and read this:

"Pleasure boats - by definition - are toys, and they are not expected to be operated outside of the bath tub environment of a small lake or bay. I do not consider Mac26x boats toys. They are recreational vessels designed specifically for ocean use with appropriate freeboard for that purpose. In addition, and unlike some sailboats sold for ocean use that have low freeboard when at rest, the freeboard on a Mac26x does not vary much when on heel under sail."

While I believe you can take any boat out into the ocean or even do enough work to beef one up so it can handle it, I don't think the Mac26x was specifically designed for "ocean use"
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  #143  
Old 06-13-2009
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Thumbs down

I think a warning with regards to the information on that website is in order. Heeding the advice, and following the logic on that site will get you in trouble if heading offshore. This does not mean that the Mac is not good for what it is intended at, just that what thay guy is concluding is sometimes very different from what most boat designers (and MacGregor themselves?) think is correct.
That said, I personally feel that the Mac (the new one - M or whatever) is a pathetic piece of junk, which I've told my kids never to board, not even in harbor.
This is based on observations of the few we have here, but I've been living right next to the dealer here in DK.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jgsteven View Post
You are probably thinking of this site:

Cruising Log of the Murrelet

I would take some of his analysis with a grain of salt, however. I find the idea of the Mac 26x and 26m to be really good -- sail when you want to sail, motor when you need to go fast or there is no wind, trailer it home to avoid split fees.

That having been said, I am not sure I would want to be in one when the winds were high or the seas large. The manufacturer site claims you can sail them in gale force winds, and even has a video up:

http://www.macgregor26.com/index/gale_2_minutes.htm

...but to me their hull form looks round and not too sea kindly, and in big winds and waves its nice to have several thousand pounds of lead sticking down below the boat (as opposed to water ballast which is, well, the same density as the ocean). For light wind as well, the sailplan is significantly smaller than a similar sized sailboat (I assume you just cut on the engine at that point).

If I didn't go into open water, for example if I was only sailing around SF bay and never going out the gate I think the Mac 26M would be ideal -- and since I *don't* go out the gate very often the boats have alot of appeal.

Regards,

Joe
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  #144  
Old 06-15-2009
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Quote from the company owner

I was just thinking again about these boats and reading the comments here, and I think this quote sums it up well:

--
As for its seaworthiness, Roger MacGregor said, “The 26 was designed for typical small cruising boat use—inland waters and limited coastal sailing. It is too small to be a long-distance passagemaker. It won’t hold enough gear and supplies, and the long-term, day-after-day motion of a small, light sailboat can be tough on the crew.

“There are thousands of these boats out there, and many have been caught in, and survived, some really extreme weather conditions, on both lakes and oceans. Like most small cruising sailboats, the 26 can handle high winds and nasty seas, but risk and discomfort levels increase dramatically in severe weather. To maximize fun and safety, most of our owners wisely keep a watchful eye on the weather and try to avoid severe conditions.”
--
Quoted from The MacGregor 26 Boat Review

Within those limits, it seems to be a great idea.
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  #145  
Old 06-16-2009
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The thread that never dies

The only thing wrong with a MacGregor is the negative elitist attitudes that always bash it, just goes to show the mentality of some sailors.
We have a MacGregor yacht club here in the PNW with well over 30 boats in the membership, there are vastly more MacGregors here than that, but these are what our club has. We enjoy many activities, including Regattas, MacRendezvous and cruises along with pot luck dinners and great comraderie. I have never met an unsatisfied owner, everyone seems to really like their MacGregor myself included. They are one of the most popularly sold sailboats of their class for very good reasons, affordable, versatile, easy to maintain, and forgiving to the beginner. I see more MacGregor sailboats than any other brand in my neck of the woods. The owners are happy with them.

Last edited by CaptKermie; 06-16-2009 at 01:24 PM. Reason: sp
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  #146  
Old 06-16-2009
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We all have our preferences. MacGregor is not the type of sailing boat that belongs to the family. It is completely different. You may like it, but you have to know that she is in a completely different class.
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  #147  
Old 06-16-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by celenoglu View Post
We all have our preferences. MacGregor is not the type of sailing boat that belongs to the family. It is completely different. You may like it, but you have to know that she is in a completely different class.
Imagine joining a motorcycle club and showing up with a vespa.
Fine if you want to have fun and ride one but dont go on about how its just as good.
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  #148  
Old 06-16-2009
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The elitist thread

I might be one negative elitist, but I've been around boats - motor and sail - all my life, and are also a sailing instructor in our club. Besides that I've worked on numerous boats, including rebuilding wooden boats, so while there's still much to learn, I'm able to spot an inferior vessel.
The M26 is undoubtedly in that category.

Economy? Right now and here, you could get a Folkboat with a small Honda outboard for 5k$ that is wellbuilt, and able to take you anywhere - this is a used boat, but in good condition, and will take care of you in way worse conditions than the M26. (This is the type of boat Blondie Hasler crossed the Atlantic in several times) Heck the 35 footer I own (1975 Contessa 35) was cheaper than a new M26 with a small outboard. Even cheaper than a one year old with a 9.9 HP motor is advertised at right now. These are European prices, but my guess is that the differences between the boats are the same?

So if a little knowledge is elitism, I'm an elitist.

Besides that, you seem like a really nice guy, and I'll buy you a beer anytime - honestly!

Respectfully
/Joms

Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptKermie View Post
The only thing wrong with a MacGregor is the negative elitist attitudes that always bash it, just goes to show the mentality of some sailors.
We have a MacGregor yacht club here in the PNW with well over 30 boats in the membership, there are vastly more MacGregors here than that, but these are what our club has. We enjoy many activities, including Regattas, MacRendezvous and cruises along with pot luck dinners and great comraderie. I have never met an unsatisfied owner, everyone seems to really like their MacGregor myself included. They are one of the most popularly sold sailboats of their class for very good reasons, affordable, versatile, easy to maintain, and forgiving to the beginner. I see more MacGregor sailboats than any other brand in my neck of the woods. The owners are happy with them.
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  #149  
Old 06-16-2009
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I don't think people saying what they have to say about a certain boat makes them elitists. People on here critisize far larger and ten times more expenses boats as well so it has nothing to do with stature. I personally do not like the Mac26x both for it's looks, and what it aims to be a power boat and sailboat combination designed for inland use. However if that is what someone is looking for and enjoys using, than that is great and I would never bash them for that as I have no business doing so. It is when these people such as in this website : Cruising Log of the Murrelet, act as if these boats are specifically designed as world class cruisers and recommends them to people looking for long term cruising and acts as if they are the greatest thing since sliced bread.

When the manufacturer says the boat was designed for typical small boat use including inland waters and limited coast cruising...and then you have this wack job who makes this website and tries to convince everyone it is the ultimate blue water boat....I think that is what pisses people off.
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  #150  
Old 06-16-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptKermie View Post
The only thing wrong with a MacGregor is the negative elitist attitudes that always bash it, just goes to show the mentality of some sailors.
I don't begrudge the happiness of M26 owners nor do I think I'm elitist ... I just don't think they're "sailboats", they are clearly power boats with a sail, and there's a difference IMO.
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