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  #11  
Old 09-26-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim H
SF, thanks for the link to the Bristol.
As for IPs, keep spreading that "too slow for anything" thought. It might make it easier for me to own one. I'm not defending IPs, but the reviews and the general satisfaction (and ongoing purchases) of owners makes me think the drawbacks are exaggerated. ...
Jim H
And Hunter owners love their Hunters. I guess its all a question of perspective, or lack thereof...

Good luck.
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  #12  
Old 09-26-2006
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The only new stuff that really impresses me (that I have seen so far) is from ETAP.
http://www.etapyachting.com/
Check out their link of building unsinkable yachts. Rather reassuring....if you can afford one.
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  #13  
Old 09-26-2006
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This is a good topic, I'm sorta in the same boat, I have a smaller, 40 year old boat and I love the hell out of it, but we are looking for a larger boat for extended adventures, the thing I like about older boats is the character and quility of workmanship that you don't find in boats these days ( this is my opinion ), if ya do you are paying a permium for it, a hugh permium; Personally I would rather find a 40-50 year old boat for 100-200 thousand and refit it, than buy a newer clorox bottle for 400,000 or more.

As far as time spent, that's kinda relative to passion and moola
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  #14  
Old 09-26-2006
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That's right John. I really like them a lot and think that they represent one of the few "affordable" blue water cruisers out there of recent vintage. The boat is comfortable, sails well, has exceptional tankage and a well designed fuel system. The 47CC is an excellent boat as well and a similar value.
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  #15  
Old 09-30-2006
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Cored hulls, like those on the C&C's aren't necessarily a dealbreaker. If the hull is done properly, then the cored hull isn't necessarily a problem.

Also, just curious as to why you toss out Tayana, Morgan, Freedoms and that group?

BTW IMHO, you should reserve about 15-20% of your purchase budget for refitting, repairing and upgrading what ever boat you end up buying.
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  #16  
Old 09-30-2006
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I am amused at the IP bashing on this site. I really think it is just jealousy judging by the posters. The are solidly built offshore boats that hold their values. I have sailed them extensively and I can tell you that they are fantastic boats. Roomy on the inside without being too much like an RV, (Catalina, Hunter, etc.). They don't cut corners on the important stuff like hardward, fittings, rigging. They sail well in heavy - light winds. I think if you can swing one financially they are worth considering.

As for older boats. I love them. I really enjoy finding that gem that needs a complete refit and bringing it back. This is the third boat that I have refit and by far it is my most ambitious project. But it gives you something to think about rather than work and it is exciting seeing the boat come back to life. I would recommend this route to anyone who has the time, skill and patience.
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  #17  
Old 10-02-2006
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I recently purchased a 94 Caliber 40.. and am very happy with it. I had been focused on other boats and particularly a 40 Passport but when I started noticing the Calibers and then everything fell into place.. Modified full keel, supported rudder, quality equipment, Very well ventilated - 21 opening ports!, No Teak decks, Manufacture still around. Sails very well.


The Caliber 38 is very much the same as the 40 except it does not have a sugar scoop so you may find something that fits your budget..
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  #18  
Old 10-02-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Surfesq
I am amused at the IP bashing on this site. I really think it is just jealousy judging by the posters. The are solidly built offshore boats that hold their values. They sail well in heavy - light winds. I think if you can swing one financially they are worth considering.

As for older boats. I love them. I really enjoy finding that gem that needs a complete refit and bringing it back.
I've been on new IPs, and the quality appeared good. Both my wife and I hope to see the interior of an IP 38 next year (89-91), since the idea of a forward pullman, and two heads, isn't necessarily a bad idea for four aboard. For sailing on the Columbia River, the cutter rig would be less than great (we sometimes tack every 10-15 mintues for hours on end), so it would be more of an "exit boat" than a daysailor or short-trip craft for us.

BTW, I did noticed that the email list for IPs here at sailnet has some pretty honest and supportive exchanges about IPs: http://list.sailnet.net/read/?forum=islandpacket

I agree with you about older boats as well-- we just got back from an excellent weekend cruise on our '73 27 footer. Hours of light air sailing, while others motored. I did discover that I have a water leak at the pump, and I need to replace or rebuild the original mechanical water pump, and I haven't rebedded all the deck hardware yet... The stuffing box is being tough to adjust, the AC wiring needs to be replaced... The list goes on, just like on any boat over 10 years old, but I also need to raise and enjoy the kids and not just work on boats (as fun as that may be).

Jim H
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  #19  
Old 10-02-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TAK
[COLOR=black][FONT=Verdana]
The Caliber 38 is very much the same as the 40 except it does not have a sugar scoop so you may find something that fits your budget..
Thanks for the tip-- I have been researching the Calibers. I have the Practical Sailor review of the 40 LRC, but I haven't got to read it yet. I did read a Cruising World review of one of the new larger models, and they seemed pretty impressed with the tankage system. Sounds like the design is almost like a double-bottom to the boat, and reduces the number of thru-hulls.

You're right that costs are high, though. A 38 would be closer to our budget.

Jim H
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  #20  
Old 10-03-2006
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim H
Thanks for the tip-- I have been researching the Calibers. I have the Practical Sailor review of the 40 LRC, but I haven't got to read it yet. I did read a Cruising World review of one of the new larger models, and they seemed pretty impressed with the tankage system. Sounds like the design is almost like a double-bottom to the boat, and reduces the number of thru-hulls.

You're right that costs are high, though. A 38 would be closer to our budget.

Jim H
I have read the PS review and it was generally positive.. they did comment on the LRC tankage and possible concerns - I like the fact that mine are installed and not intergrated and while I it only has 45 gallons of fuel I can add a second tank tho not enough to equal the 200 plus LRC. But I think I am fine w/ that. My water is 125.

The construction seems very solid.. and sails alot better than I expected in five-six knots of wind.. and very well in 18-20.

There is a 38 in Severna Park MD that is a FSBO .. I looked at it prior to buying and it showed well.. I dont recall what he was asking but low 100s. I think.
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