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-   -   Dazed & Confused... Boat Speed. (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/boat-review-purchase-forum/24478-dazed-confused-boat-speed.html)

lmitchell 10-27-2006 04:03 PM

Dazed & Confused... Boat Speed.
 
OK,...

How do I determine how fast a boat is?
Example: I've been told a Tartan 37 is faster than a Tayana 37.
I've been told a Tayana 37 is faster than a Tartan 37.
I've been told a Tartan 37 is faster than a Valiant 37.
I've been told a Valiant 37 is faster than a Cabo Rico 38.

What Gives?
HELP!!!!

Lawson

btrayfors 10-27-2006 04:14 PM

One place to start would be with the PHRF ratings.

Check 'em out here: http://www.ussailing.org/phrf/

Lot's of things determine how fast a boat is, not just its design. None of the boats you list is a speed-demon by modern design standards.

But, what are you looking for???

Bill

lmitchell 10-27-2006 04:22 PM

Looking for...
 
Thanks for the reply.

Basic looking for guidelines are:

Capable bluewater boat for crossings...
Capable of coastal cruising in light airs...
Not too much of a slow poke...
A boat that sails...

Lawson

cardiacpaul 10-27-2006 04:36 PM

I'll take a "slow" boat with a good skipper over a "fast" boat with a newbie or a fool at the helm any day.

Example.
I've been on a CSY44 that just plain smoked a J105 in 20 kt wind. Big fun, big fun indeed.

labatt 10-27-2006 04:57 PM

The speed of a boat is a factor of a lot of different things. Visit http://www.image-ination.com/sailcalc.html for some calculators and comparisons. Theoretical hull speed can be computed just using the length of your boat at the waterline. But what is the length when you're heeled at 30 degrees vs. 5 degrees? Things change. A heavy displacement boat may take more wind to get you up to hull speed. The Tartan 37 you mentioned above is more of a performance cruiser (racer/cruiser) while the Cabo Rico is the complete opposite - a heavy offshore bluewater boat. A boat that's good for bluewater cruising will *generally* be a slower, heavier boat and not be as good for coastal cruising in light air. A lighter displacement coastal cruiser will be uncomfortable (and in many cases, unsafe) to cross the Atlantic in. Just my two cents...

hedglin 10-30-2006 03:00 PM

Remove the freezer!
 
If you've seen "Summer Rental" with John Candy, you'll know that removing the freezer and it's food, along with adding a pair of pants as a sail will make any POS ex-restaurant boat faster than a racing boat.

CBinRI 10-30-2006 04:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hedglin
If you've seen "Summer Rental" with John Candy, you'll know that removing the freezer and it's food, along with adding a pair of pants as a sail will make any POS ex-restaurant boat faster than a racing boat.

I always understood it to be a documentary.;)


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