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post #11 of 29 Old 11-27-2006
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I don't see any Alerions in your area but here's the few I found:
http://www.yachtworld.com/core/listi...&pbsint=&ps=30
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post #12 of 29 Old 11-27-2006
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Bob,

saildrive is the best thing ever invented that goes with a propeller on a boat!!!

Make sure to get a folding prop with it. Gori is a good one.(stay away from the feathering ones). Folding is just fine.

Saildrives are almost maintenance free, power the boat horizontaly, allows to move the engine forward for balance, less moving parts, no weird sealing stuff (just a membrane that lasts forever, and even has an alarm for when water gets in the sealed area).

Here is s photo of one.
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SAILDRIVE.jpg   sd2.jpg  
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post #13 of 29 Old 11-27-2006
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Angry

actually 23:44 !!

Almost time to go to bed... fortunately we just had a baby 7 months ago and he does not let us sleep until mid.night!! gotta love it!!!

He sailed with us for 2 months.... August and September, and behaved like a true sailor, kept everyone awake at night! LOL

I have been cleaning my pc so some photos were downloaded in the members gallery. I will add more.

Soon we will be racing, too. Because it is a racing boat, with a few "commodities" as per my wife's "demands".
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post #14 of 29 Old 11-27-2006
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I think the Alerion is expensive for a few reasons: first, the hull is made with the SCRIMP system of resin infusion. This is the most expensive way to make a fiberglass hull. It supposedly creates a better hull because it allows for more precise mixing of the resins and a better bond with the fiberglass mat. It also requires that the manufacturer also pay a licensing fee to the inventor. The fittings and everything else is also first class. I think the biggest reason for the high price is marketing: it is expensive because it looks expensive and they want the product to have an expensive image.
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post #15 of 29 Old 11-28-2006
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The Cal 20 has it's outboard in a well in the cockpit, eliminating your concerns and also providing an inexpensive, fast, light learning boat that is a jiff to sail single-handed. Quite a few around and some organized racing depending on where you are located.
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post #16 of 29 Old 11-28-2006
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SCRIMP is actually an acronym for something; I don't remember what, but regardless, I do remember the basic premise: Fiberglass layup is done by saturating fiberglass material (either in mats or chopped up and sprayed) with resins. Getting the right mix of resin to fiberglass is difficult, and making sure the resin gets into every void is critical as open spaces create weak points structurally. The process also literally, stinks. The fumes from this process are harmful to people and the environment. The details elude me, but the SCRIMP process somehow provides a vaccuum environment, sucking up all of the fumes, forcing the resin into every little space of the fiberglass and allowing precise control of the resin/fiberglass ratio. The process is patented, and is used by a number of builders, most notably at the high end of the yacht business. If you are interested, check out the book "Heart of Glass" by Dan Spurr. It is a history of fiberglass boat building and describes many of the processes we all take for granted.
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post #17 of 29 Old 11-28-2006
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mstern

Maybe I can help.
My boat was built using that method, its a "sandwich" of fiberglass / Divinicell / fiberglass, (we call that PVC core over here) that is vaccuumed during layout and curing process.
The reason we built with that method with PVC is mainly to reduce weight, and provide extraodinaire stiffness.
This is now common practice in most race boats and faster cruiser racers, as other required structural heavier parts can be removed due to the much stronger hull and deck, to save weight.

The fumes are bad anyway, even if they are not vaccuumed, vaccuum is just done so that we make sure the resin gets to all areas aviding air bubles that make it weaker.

The reasons why it is more expensive are because the process takes longer than just applying the resin, and due to the EXTREMELY expensive Divinicell, as different parts require different core densities and types.

But the fumes, well, they are there anyway with both methods, comes with the territory, as you say in the USA!!
Just to give you an idea, my boat (fully loaded with engine, mast sails etc.) weighs just under 6200 kg (13.000lbs), for a 42'. Normally a boat that big to maintain same structural strenght with traditional method will weigh almost double of that.

I believe Sabre also build them like that. not sure. Maybe you can find out.

Not financial competitive method for "regular" boats.

Hope it helps.
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post #18 of 29 Old 11-30-2006 Thread Starter
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MStern, Camaraderie, RayMetz, Sailaway, & Giulietta,

You have all been very helpful. This has been an informative and pleasant experience. I have been introduced to Giulietta and her master, and to the Alerion and her stern drive. However, we have been on a futile quest.

To learn more about the requirements for negotiating Charleston's harbor (regarding the feasibility of an outboard), I contacted Mark Montgomery, an ASA instructor and proprietor of the Charleston/Miami Sailing School. In a telephone conversation a little while ago, he informed me that harbor conditions are more severe than I had imagined. There is a 3+ kt current at the harbor mouth, and the harbor itself itself is not for light boats. His recommendation is for a coastal cruiser around 7 1/2 tons. This matches what I had in mind for a second boat. If I'm going to learn to sail in a light boat, I'll be doing it on a lake around Atlanta.

I was concerned that the Alerion at nearly 3 tons would be too heavy as a learning boat; what a surprise. It is a boat I would have liked to have.

Giulietta, keep 'em coming! I never get tired of the pictures you're sending us. Beautiful, beautiful boat. I believe you gave some people a different perspective regarding teak decks, but you do have foam-cored construction rather than balsa-cored. Beautiful deck, too!

Thanks guys. Catch you on another thread.
Bob

Last edited by jones2r; 11-30-2006 at 04:50 PM.
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post #19 of 29 Old 11-30-2006
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Bob,

you're welcome. Hope you 're not leaving us, are you??

I would like to ask you Americans one question.

I have understood by reading posts on this site, that a lot of people that is starting to sail, do that at an older age, some over 50. My question is why so late?? don't you guys have sailing available as a sport in your schools, or don't you have youth programs that encorage kids to sail? I am sure that many kids sail in the USA. You have made some of the best in the World.

The majority of people that sail in my Country, (I can tell you its almost over 90%) started sailing at age 7, 8, 10, but very rarely after 15. (maybe dating bcomes a priority at this age!!).

Sailing over here, at the clubs, is very cheap, (unless you are competing, then you must buy you own boat) and easy available to the young, and most students are kids. A sailing course on a 15' to 20' for adults for 3 months is around $200. How is it there?? Please if you don't mind, let me know, ok??
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post #20 of 29 Old 11-30-2006
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Jones...now you know why I recommended the Com-pac! I will disagree with the instructor about the harbor itself. Most days it is just fine for something like the Alerion but it just isn't that big an area and there is little of interest so you really need to go outside to have sailing fun. Maybe the lake ain't such a bad place to start.

Giuletta...there are lots of sailing schools here and lots of fleet racing for the kiddies in Optimists etc. in almost every decent sailing area. But...American kids have lots of other choices and only a very small percentage go sailing. A lot of people here graduate to sailboats as adults after taking a cruise with friends or messing around with motor boats and noticing the sailboats don't pull up to the gas pumps quite so often!
Say hi to Figo and Ronaldo for me!
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