Advice for a solid coastal cruiser - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 12-04-2006
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Posts: 9
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
montigre is on a distinguished road
Advice for a solid coastal cruiser

Hi Everyone,

I hope you do not mind yet another what kind of boat for cruising question, but I really would like to ask your advice regarding a few boats that we have on our short list and I’ve found that because of the multitude of choices available I am becoming more than a little confused. I have been reading these posts for a few years now and although I do not always agree with what everyone says, the majority of the advice offered contains true gems of wisdom that I really appreciate.

For a bit of our history, my husband and I are still novice sailors having only owned 2 boats in the last 7 years, so although we have a good grasp of the basics, there is still very much for us to learn. The 2 boats we owned were a Catalina 30 and an Alberg 30. The Catalina, though a great boat for entertaining at the docks and sailing around the Chesapeake (in high tide) tended to literally beat us up when caught in a blow and we also did not like the fact that we could not easily reach the handholds while down below when the waters were rough. On the other hand, the Alberg was a much nicer sailing boat overall and was definitely more sturdily constructed, but we felt it was too small for us and our eventual plans to branch out and start cruising the Eastern US and Caribbean islands and it also had a very annoying tendency to become rolly on some points of sail under certain wave conditions. Finally, we primarily sail as a couple, so we’re really are not interested in purchasing a sailing condo that can accommodate a household of people, we have no aspirations to cross an ocean, but we do want a sturdy, safe, and reliable distance coastal cruiser.

As for our likes, we really prefer the lines of the more traditional boats and find them very aesthetically pleasing to the eye and our choices are further limited by the fact that we wish to spend about $30,000 for the boat. We realize that because of this, anything we buy will have to be seriously upgraded and updated before we actually start any serious distance cruising and, therefore, plan to use the next 5 years performing those upgrades while cruising around the Chesapeake getting to know the boat inside and out.

The boats on our short list thus far are the Tartan 34 classic, the Luders 33, and the Allied Seabreeze 35. Right now, of the three, we’re leaning more toward the Tartan for being able to morph into a comfortable distance cruising platform while still being a fun boat to sail around the Chesapeake. The fact that it has a shallower draft means we’d be able to get in and out of the skinny water areas of the bay without having to wait for high tide like we had to do with the Catalina before some of the channels were dredged. We’d likely not even seriously use the centerboard until we started distance cruising. We’re also interested in getting a boat that has a workable seaberth and can be single-handed without too much problem just in case one of us gets seasick or is somehow incapacitated while sailing.

So, the questions I have for you are: Are we on the right track with the Tartan 34? Is there anything inherently wrong with any of the boats on our list in light of what our current and future plans are? And finally, are there other boats we should be considering?

Sorry for the length of the post and thanks in advance for any information you’re able to share.

Regards,
Gail

Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 12-04-2006
camaraderie's Avatar
moderate?
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: East Coast
Posts: 13,878
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 15
camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough
Hi Gail...Nothing wrong with your choice for the waters you plan to sail though I must admit I don't like centerboards for bluewater cruising though there are a lot of them out there! Looks like that is a preference of yours.
You might want to further your investigation into the T34 with these links:

http://www.tartanowners.org/reviews.phtml
Tartan Owners Website: http://www.tartanowners.org/
Chesapeake Bay Tartan Sailing Club: http://www.cbtsc.com/
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 12-04-2006
PBzeer's Avatar
Wandering Aimlessly
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Cruising
Posts: 19,914
Thanks: 0
Thanked 81 Times in 78 Posts
Rep Power: 14
PBzeer has a spectacular aura about PBzeer has a spectacular aura about PBzeer has a spectacular aura about
Though priced above your budget when sold in Canada, I find my Ontario 32 to be a great boat for coastal, limited off-shore work. 4'6" draft, 45' mast height makes it pretty much of a go anywhere boat on the US coast and Carib. Has good stowage, and a fair amount of tankage for a boat that size. If you can find one in the US, it will generally fall within your budget.

Regards, and good luck in your search,
__________________
John
Ontario 32 - Aria

Free, is the heart, that lives not, in fear.
Full, is the spirit, that thinks not, of falling.
True, is the soul, that hesitates not, to give.
Alive, is the one, that believes, in love.
JCP


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
- Website & Blog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 12-06-2006
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Posts: 9
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
montigre is on a distinguished road
Camaraderie,
Thanks for the vote of confidence. Regarding the center boarders, no, it’s really not a matter of preferring them; we have never sailed a boat with a centerboard, it’s just that within our price line, many of the boats are so equipped. I would like to know why a centerboard would not be your choice for bluewater cruising especially if, like in the case of the Tartan, the board is not weighted and it can be locked. Have I missed something in my research?

Also, thanks for the website links. I had already found them and that is another reason I am leaning more toward the Tartan, like with the Alberg, there is a very strong and active owners association which I have found to be a priceless commodity when restoring or maintaining an older boat and the fact that the factory is still in business is an added plus. Tartan still can provide some (certainly not all) replacement parts for their discontinued models. Thanks again.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 12-06-2006
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Posts: 9
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
montigre is on a distinguished road
PBzeer,
I do like your Ontario 32 and if we had chosen to add $20,000 to what we wished to pay for a boat at this time, it would surely have made it onto our take a hard look list. The Ontario along with a couple others like the Contessa 32 seem to be nearly the perfect compromise between having more traditional lines yet with more modern accommodations without sacrificing either Tankage, stowage, or sailing ability.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 12-06-2006
ehmanta's Avatar
Sailing Junkie
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Virginia
Posts: 295
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
ehmanta is on a distinguished road
Tartan 34

The Tartan 34 is a great boat. This design has been around since the late sixties and the last production 34 is now thirty years old. What you need to look for in this boat that might be bad , are the decks. The large fixed portlights and the chainplates have a tendancy for leaks that go unchecked for years and this water will migrate into the decks; although this is true for any boat, the T-34 seems to be susceptible to this.I've owned a T-37 for over a decade and can attest to its sailing ability. The T-37 is a design that evolved from the T-34. The Sparkman-Stevens designs are tops in appearance as well as performance.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 12-06-2006
T37Chef's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Maryland
Posts: 4,101
Thanks: 57
Thanked 28 Times in 26 Posts
Rep Power: 8
T37Chef will become famous soon enough
T34C will surely post something soon.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 12-06-2006
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Posts: 9
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
montigre is on a distinguished road
ehmanta~
I’ll have a much better idea of how the T-34 sails once we have an opportunity to do a sea trial on one in the next couple of weeks, but meanwhile, perhaps you might not mind answering a few more specific questions. I’ll also pose these to the T34 list. Since the T-37 and T-34 are similarly designed how would you classify the sailing characteristics of the T-37 in very rough weather (like squall or tropical low conditions)? What is the motion like when it gets really rough? Does she tend to sail over or through the waves as they start to exceed 5’? Have you noticed excessive hobby horsing? How easily does she motor through heavy waves? Is there an excessive amount of pressure on the helm while under power? Thanks for your post and opinion.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 12-06-2006
T37Chef's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Maryland
Posts: 4,101
Thanks: 57
Thanked 28 Times in 26 Posts
Rep Power: 8
T37Chef will become famous soon enough
Gail,

Your research looks good. Some of the reasons we choose our Tartan 37 are its value, sturdy construction, versatility, character, and the vast support Tartan owners have access to.

I don't know much about the T34 but if its a basis for the T37 I can tell you I think your looking at a great boat for your intentions.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 12-06-2006
camaraderie's Avatar
moderate?
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: East Coast
Posts: 13,878
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 15
camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough
Montigre...You asked about my non-centerboard preference. I've owned 2 boats with keel centerboards for bay cruising and they certainly opened up skinnier waters to me. The reasons I don't like them for blue water are:
1. The centerboard is there for windward performance so it must be working properly for proper performance under sail.
2. They require maintenance and pennants and attahment points give way and cannot generally be repaired without a haul out and when the board is down you often can't get into the haulout slip due to the draft. You have to find a way to get the board back up in the trunk.
3. They are relatively flimsy and suseptible to impact.
4. I prefer a well designed and ballasted keel to keep me on track and the boat upright and "stiff"

Before everyone jumps on me with reasons why my reasoning is faulty....I will say once again that I recognize that there are MANY quality boats designed for blue water that use K/CB arrangements and sail happily all over the world. Just responding to the question about my personal preference!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Production blue water boats JakeLevi Boat Review and Purchase Forum 73 07-31-2009 10:07 PM
Bluewater defined? dch Learning to Sail 44 07-29-2009 07:20 PM
what determines a coastal cruiser??? troyaux Boat Review and Purchase Forum 18 02-14-2007 11:39 PM
Please Help Me Choose a Boat! JEdwards Boat Review and Purchase Forum 62 08-14-2006 02:19 PM
Looking For A First Coastal Cruiser Boxer Ruby Boat Review and Purchase Forum 5 07-20-2001 06:07 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:20 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.