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-   -   Atomic 4 replacement (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/boat-review-purchase-forum/27541-atomic-4-replacement.html)

brak 01-06-2007 11:47 PM

Atomic 4 replacement
 
This is an off-shoot of my other thread. C&C 35 MK1 was mentioned, and quite a few of them are for sale out there. All have Atomic 4 as an engine. Did anyone look into (or better yet - actually completed) repowering with diesel? What were the costs, issues, specific experiences? If you can recommend a place that did a good job (and did not leave you completely despondent) - even better.

cardiacpaul 01-07-2007 09:26 AM

the costs far outweight the benefits IMO. Unless this is going to be the last boat you ever own.
I'm not going to get into the gas vs diesel thing here, just some numbers.

a new diesel will run you 7-10k. now add a new fuel tank, lines, a couple of racors and ou've added another 2-3k.

A rebuilt a-4 from moyer will run you less than 4500.00 less shipping.

uniexpany 01-07-2007 10:44 AM

Atomic 4 replacement
 
Depends on how you plan to use the boat. If you want to go offshore you are better off with a fuel-injected diesel than a carbureted gasoline inboard. If you are staying coastal the A-4 is a lovely smooth running auxilary.

brak 01-07-2007 10:58 AM

Well, thats what I was thinking. Besides potentially I could be looking at a rebuilt diesel as well. But then, as long as you don't do it yourself - there is probably a very significant cost to pay to a mechanic.

So far the biggest thing I've done is rebuilding Volvo diesel cooling system (I HATE them, really!) - that does not rise to level of real engine work, so I am not sure I am qualified to do actual replacement just yet :)

cardiacpaul 01-07-2007 11:17 AM

unless you're familiar with the terms "prussian blue" and "plastiguage", can read a micrometer,have the inside micke & check the bore for out of round...(kinda like prunes, is .001 too few, or is .005 too many), know which end is up on a piston ring, have a machine shop that knows the difference between checking and milling off .003 I'd leave it for the pros.

Loewe 01-07-2007 11:46 AM

Beta has a great product for A4 replacement. Previou scomments are spot on though. If you plan to keep the boat for the next 20 years go for it, if not A4 is a great motor.
Regards,Red

Tartan34C 01-07-2007 12:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by uniexpany
Depends on how you plan to use the boat. If you want to go offshore you are better off with a fuel-injected diesel than a carbureted gasoline inboard. If you are staying coastal the A-4 is a lovely smooth running auxilary.

Why is that? Being offshore doesnít require an engine at all so how does it matter which you have and how the fuel gets into the cylinder canít make much of a difference can it?
Robert Gainer

georgellop 01-07-2007 02:15 PM

Repowering a sailboat is an easy project as long as you can remove the old engine and drop the new one without having to disassemble them..

The main issues are going to be:

Engine brand/model and Reduction gear choice: Here you have to do your research and due diligence.

Once you have removed the old engine and presented the new one in its place, you will be able to tell what if any changes to the engine bed need to be made. Also the lenght of the shaft could be determined. If a new shaft is needed then haul out and replace the bearing (if showing wear) the shaft and the prop.

Once the new shaft is in position with the coupler installed, position the engine on its bed and align port/stbd, mark and bolt mounts. Stop the aligment work at this stage and install s/w, f.o. and exhaust hoses and the wiring harness/gauge panel. Lauch the boat, let it settle and complete the aligment of the engine/trani to the shaft coupler. Seatrial.

You can reuse your tank (flush it), tie the return to the vent hose.

All the details involved in steps above are all over your new engine owner's manual and the internet.

If you decide to go with a diesel engine then the choices will be a used engine, rebuilt engine or a new engine. The main reason people re-power is beacuse they have had enough of the problems i.e. lack of reliability.... with the cost of labor being what it is put your $ to the best use and get a new engine. i.e. 00000 hours, no problems, 100% reliable. Regardless, you will be having to deal with installation whether you choose a used/rebuilt or new engine.

...George.

JouvertSpirit 01-07-2007 02:35 PM

I am in the process of repowering my Pearson 10M with a new Yanmar 3YM20. The old engine is a two cylinder Farymann. I plan to keep the original fuel tank (SS), fuel lines, Racor filter and raw water strainers, control levers and cables, shaft and prop. Will have to go to larger exhaust hose, and modify the stringer beds a little. Boat comes out of the water early next week and I expect to have it running within 7 days with the new engine. I know this is not the same as going from gas to diesel.

I'm taking before and after pictures and will keep the group posted on the progress. I know there will be unexpected problems that will have to be dealt with.

I debated for a while on using a dripless stuffing box but finally decided to go conventional.

brak 01-07-2007 02:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cardiacpaul
unless you're familiar with the terms "prussian blue" and "plastiguage", can read a micrometer,have the inside micke & check the bore for out of round...(kinda like prunes, is .001 too few, or is .005 too many), know which end is up on a piston ring, have a machine shop that knows the difference between checking and milling off .003 I'd leave it for the pros.

That was my feeling too :) I am not that skilled in engine dept. nor will I ever be, I know my limits.


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