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  #21  
Old 01-18-2007
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Talking French Navy

Quote:
Originally Posted by Giulietta
EXTRA EXTRA EXTRA.....
Photos of first Portuguese Submarine tests published.

Portuguese Navy uses OLD SLOW boats as target practice.


Ok Giu, let's have some fun. Go to Google.com, type in French Military Victories and click I'm Feeling Lucky.
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  #22  
Old 01-18-2007
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Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice Giulietta is just really nice
Gil,

I can't believe it!!! It actually opens a page and says DEFEATS!!!

aahhahahahaha that is the best of the week.

T, CD. we've got a new friend....Gil...

Gil, say hi to the guys...guys...say hi to Gil!!!!
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  #23  
Old 01-18-2007
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Sonofason....

I lived in Seabrook (right next to Clear Lake for those of you that are not familiar with the area) for 2-1/2 years and know every square inch of waterway in that area. IF you decide to buy a boat with no motor I thinks its safe to say you're not going to enjoy sailing much due to the stress level. The boat traffic in that area is INSANE. Everything from maniacs in saltwater canoes up to 100+ foot yatchs at all hours of the day. You need to be able to motor out far enough to get decent wind and to avoid the maniacs on the jetskis that will add to your stress level. Another thing to consider in those waters is the draft of your boat. Most of the bay is deep enough (15'-20' especially near the bridge) however, if you live near the apartment complexes on NASA Rd 1 as I did you're only looking at 4 to 7 feet.....add some chop to the water and you may run aground or batter the keel if youre in a rocky area.
I'm not expert on boats I just know your area well. My advice is get something from 20' to 28' maximum that you'll be able to handle alone. I'm sure the more experienced guys on this board can recommend a few boats. Also, get something that has an inboard motor. This way when you're not out there learning and want to spend some time with the family you still have a vessel that you can operate with the wife and kids on board, run electricity for creature comforts and most importantly recharge your batteries without the need for shore power or running bulky batteries home every time you go out. My .02 .....




-Nick
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  #24  
Old 01-18-2007
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I'll take a bit of a contrarian view here. What I would do is go and buy a boat in the 30-32' range that is stable and accomodating for the family and will be MORE stable than the smaller boats AND easier to handle...(I know that sounds strange but the bigger the boat the EASIER it is to handle since the added weight makes it handle bigger seas and heavier winds without stress). The only thing that is MORE difficult about handling a bigger boat is coming into the dock UNDER POWER and that just takes practice.
Next I would HIRE a captain to go out with you a few times until you feel comfortable with the boat. This is better than learning on a small boat and then having to re-learn on a larger boat.
You can easily get a NICE Catalina 30 for about $20K which is way under your budget and another grand for a captain to teach you how to sail YOUR boat and work all the systems is a great investment. When you're through, you'll have a nice boat for local cruising with the family with a real head and galley and even air conditioning and a dockside electric system so you can spend weekends aboard in comfort.
Of course...fit out the boat for single-handing and get an auto-pilot etc. ...but don't be afraid of starting on a larger boat.
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  #25  
Old 01-18-2007
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Hey Gil- Just for fun I tried it. Guess what I got when googling "french military victories"??????
Your search - french military victories - did not match any documents. Suggestions:. - Make sure all words are spelled correctly. - Try different keywords. ...
www.albinoblacksheep.com/text/victories.html - 11k - Cached - Similar pages

Note the web site given!!!
Now would you guys stop with that picture of my boat!!! For shits sake, it's not a Catalina!!
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  #26  
Old 01-18-2007
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I'm with Cam... a 30' boat is probably going to seem a lot more safe to your wife, especially with the children aboard. You can get a Alberg 30 for less than $20K in nice condition, and the Alberg 30 is likely to have less draft than the Catalina 30, and be better for offshore work.
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  #27  
Old 01-18-2007
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another vote here for the 30 ft boat. The amount of room, stability, and "liveability" with a 30 footer is unbelievable compared to a 27 or 28.
There are boats down there just plain stacked up looking for new owners, at very good prices. (less than 25k) and, I just happen to know a guy that is bored stupid and would love to teach someone to sail their own hole in the water.
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  #28  
Old 01-18-2007
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Sailing Clubs or Small Boat

Hello,

Are there any sailing clubs near you? If so, join and you can start sailing without having to own a boat.

If not, I would suggest getting something small and cheap. I bought my first boat, a 1981 Catalina 22, in 2003. My kids were 2, 5, 8 at the time. I chose the Catalina because it was trailerable, cheap, swing keel, had a small cabin for the kids to get out of the weather, and room for a porta potty. If that is too small, move up to a 25' boat.

IMHO, you don't need lessons, just a friend to go out with a few times. Sailing isn't that hard! Get out there and sail sail sail until you get it.

I don't think buying a 30' or larger boat is a good idea. You don't know what you want yet. The bigger the boat, the more complicated the boat, with many more things to go wrong. And it's much harder to SELL a bigger boat than a smaller boat.

Good luck,
Barry
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  #29  
Old 01-19-2007
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If you have a comfortable boat that you can take the kids on and wife without being miseable or worried to death about a capsize or the kids falling over, you will use the boat more and be much more happy. Period. I am a father and raised (and still do) my kids on a boat. Giu and others are right: kids on a boat is no big deal. You just start early with the rules and don't waiver. Review other threads for kids on boats. Myself and several other members that have raised kids on their boats have put a lot of info in there for you to review. If you have any questions, you can re-post here or PM me.

I would buy a Catalina down there. That is Catalina country and a very popular boat. Sea Lake is a good broker around you and very knowledgeable. Ask for Brad. I have never purchased a boat from them, but have had many dealings with them at shows and elsewhere. They are one of the better brokers on the gulf. They also sell many boat lines (not just Catalina) and are actually skilled sailors (WOW... what a nice change!!).
I think a Catalina will hold its value down there better than probably any other line that is comparable.

The Catalina 30 is a good choice. The 28 is a smaller boat, but for the money the 30 may be better. I would also tell you that the 32 is one of the best sailing boats under 35' I have EVER been on. The kids will be comfortable, the wife comfortable, air conditioning, big boat systems, small boat handle.

If you buy a sailboat down there that does not have a motor, especially not being a skilled sailor, you are insane. You will be dealing with the freighters that cannot manuever and Sea Rays that just flat do not care. The hard part of being on the "ocean" is NOT the sailing, it is the manuevering and waterways and learning to avoid the traffic, etc. My opinion.

I know T reccomended a trailerable boat. I have owned one too. There are exceptions to the rule, but my opinion is that trailerable boats are really used for about the first month or two, then it is so much of a pain to move it or rig it that they start getting neglected and un-used. Now, you can put your trailerable boat in a marina... but then why did you buy a trailerable in the first place? Full keel heave non-trailerable boats will sail better and are more stable. I would avoid all water ballast.

If you want to spend a lot less money and get the feel for sailing, try a Catalina 250. It is trailerable, but I would not use it as such. It is a nice sailing little boat and will get you used to how they handle. The family can go down below and lay down. It has a head and small galley. It really does not have the big boat systems, but it is affordable. THere is also no air conditioner, unless you rig a top-mount unit.

In boats, everything is a trade-off. With the young kids and responsibilities you will be faced with (in time, if nothing else), buy a boat that will make it EASY to get out with the family on... not just an escape when you can get a babysitter. A little time on the h2o with the kids and wife, you will become experts and be comfortable. You just have to take the time.

My thoughts.

- CD
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  #30  
Old 01-19-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cruisingdad
I would buy a Catalina down there. That is Catalina country and a very popular boat. Sea Lake is a good broker around you and very knowledgeable. Ask for Brad. I have never purchased a boat from them, but have had many dealings with them at shows and elsewhere. They are one of the better brokers on the gulf. They also sell many boat lines (not just Catalina) and are actually skilled sailors (WOW... what a nice change!!).
I think a Catalina will hold its value down there better than probably any other line that is comparable.

The Catalina 30 is a good choice. The 28 is a smaller boat, but for the money the 30 may be better. I would also tell you that the 32 is one of the best sailing boats under 35' I have EVER been on. The kids will be comfortable, the wife comfortable, air conditioning, big boat systems, small boat handle.

If you buy a sailboat down there that does not have a motor, especially not being a skilled sailor, you are insane. You will be dealing with the freighters that cannot manuever and Sea Rays that just flat do not care. The hard part of being on the "ocean" is NOT the sailing, it is the manuevering and waterways and learning to avoid the traffic, etc. My opinion.

I know T reccomended a trailerable boat. I have owned one too. There are exceptions to the rule, but my opinion is that trailerable boats are really used for about the first month or two, then it is so much of a pain to move it or rig it that they start getting neglected and un-used. Now, you can put your trailerable boat in a marina... but then why did you buy a trailerable in the first place? Full keel heave non-trailerable boats will sail better and are more stable. I would avoid all water ballast.

If you want to spend a lot less money and get the feel for sailing, try a Catalina 250. It is trailerable, but I would not use it as such. It is a nice sailing little boat and will get you used to how they handle. The family can go down below and lay down. It has a head and small galley. It really does not have the big boat systems, but it is affordable. THere is also no air conditioner, unless you rig a top-mount unit.

In boats, everything is a trade-off. With the young kids and responsibilities you will be faced with (in time, if nothing else), buy a boat that will make it EASY to get out with the family on... not just an escape when you can get a babysitter. A little time on the h2o with the kids and wife, you will become experts and be comfortable. You just have to take the time.

My thoughts.

- CD
Hey CD... Why did you recommend a Catalina... I thought you hated Catalinas...
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
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