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  #21  
Old 01-27-2007
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Sailormann will become famous soon enough
My two cents ... Fixer-uppers are rarely more economical in the long run. You are going to end up having to buy a lot of new parts at retail prices. The biggest advantage they offer is the opportunity to modify and rebuild the boat just the way you want it. Pay attention to things like balance and center of gravity when you are doing it though. You can adversely affect the sailing characteristics of a boat by moving things around too much. As a general rule - don't move or alter the shape of bulkheads - they're fairly important bits. If I was looking with your criteria, I'd spend time checking out "custom" built boats, and lesser known brands. A lot of these are crap but a lot of them are well-made decent performers. Their market value is lower because they may be homebuilt or home-finished, or they may have been built by a little-known but very competent boatyard. Also - be very, very, very, very careful of cored hulls ! Your budget dictates that you'll be looking at boats that will probably have had multiple owners previous to you. All it takes is one fool somewhere in the chain to drill a hole somewhere and the hull is ruined. It will cost far more money than you have available to fix properly. Something else to consider is the ferro-cement market. BE VERY CAREFUL, do some reading and checking, but if you find a good solid hull, then you've found a good boat indeed. Unlike any other hull material, the older these boats get, the stronger they get (up to about 100 years or so). The headroom issue: as a rule of thumb - subtract three inches or so from the brochures' stated headroom and you'll have a pretty good idea of whether or not you'll fit (You're probably going to be wearing shoes). When you are looking at boats on Yachtworld et. al., remember that the prices listed are rarely what the boats actually sell for - if you see something you like, contact the seller/broker and tell them how much you have. A lot of these boats have been for sale for upwards of a year and people will often negotiate heavily. And when you finally get tired of looking and comparing and cheking and researching, well just buy something and get on with it. There's no perfect boat and there's no perfect way to buy it. Ponder less and sail more !
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  #22  
Old 01-27-2007
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The biggest advantage [fixer-uppers] offer is the opportunity to modify and rebuild the boat just the way you want it.

I actually like the idea of this, myself. There are many things I can imagine myself changing about nearly any boat I get. I agree that trim and CG are things to be extremely careful of, however. Good idea, too, with the custom and lesser-known brands. If you are familiar with any of the latter, let me know!

I also hadn't considered shoes in my headroom calculations. I'd guess that makes me about 5'9" or so...depending on the shoe.

As a general rule, about how far below asking price can one go and still have a decent chance of getting the boat? 1/3?

Thanks again to all...lots to think about!

And Pigslo: Looks like quite a nice boat! A little longer than I'm looking for, but the layout looks cool - especially the galley
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  #23  
Old 01-27-2007
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Lesser known brands ... not sure which coast you're on ... out west look for Cascade - strong hulls that have been sold both as kits and as finished boats, Samson ferro-cement boats (good quality), in the Great Lakes area Northern, Northstar, Kelt, Nordica, Halman, Hinterhoeller, Ouyang, out east look for Paceship, Stevens, Morse, Edey and Duff, in the south try Hake. When you are looking at websites names like Mason, Roberts, Colvic, and the ever-popular "Custom", are indicators that the boats may be home-built. Another option to consider is buying a stripped out racer and fitting it out for cruising - Nelson Marek and the like are great options. Right now on Yachtworld there is a Peterson 34 for 25K - great boat ! There is a beautiful Vineyard Vixen, a small Valiant, and my personal favourite - a Rhodes Bounty. Check out the Rhodes Bounty, it was built when fibreglass was still a novelty,so the hull is super-strong, the lines are beautiful, and you might just be able to work out some creative financing. As a rule of thumb, when I buy a boat, I start with an offer that is 50% of asking. I have never paid more than 70% of asking, and am in the process of buying boat number 6. If you have the time, it is worthwhile going through the websites and making a list of the boats that you like, the date you listed them, and the asking price. Check periodically to see what hasn't been sold. When you are ready to purchase, go back through this list and start putting in lowball offers...you'll be surprised how many people say yes. Good luck !
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  #24  
Old 01-27-2007
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Faster, SD,
Thanks for the info. I was aware of that and was going to see if there were plugs when i removed the thru-hulls. My idea being that if there are no plugs than the hull is solid glass> Am I barking up the right tree here? Anyway, I'm not too concerned about it. The hull is fine and I am going to have it blasted to the gel coat with walnuts and paint it with Phasecoat. Has anyone here used this product yet?
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  #25  
Old 01-27-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southerncross31
Faster, SD,
Thanks for the info. I was aware of that and was going to see if there were plugs when i removed the thru-hulls. My idea being that if there are no plugs than the hull is solid glass> Am I barking up the right tree here? Anyway, I'm not too concerned about it. The hull is fine and I am going to have it blasted to the gel coat with walnuts and paint it with Phasecoat. Has anyone here used this product yet?
Nope... if the installation of the thru-hulls was done properly, all you'll see is solid glass or solid epoxy in the area where the thru-hull was. If it was done wrong, you will clearly see the core... however, not seeing a core doesn't mean it isn't a cored hull. I would be concerned about it, as hull delamination due to the hull being cored and water getting is exceptionally expensive to repair.

From what I understand, Phasecoat is a non-toxic anti-fouling paint.

It is good for boats that are regularly used, but not good if the boat is a dock queen...since it depends on the boat's movement through the water to help keep the hull clear. How well it works will probably depend on where you are located... it would probably work fine in cooler and temperate waters, but probably not as well in the tropics, where growth is significantly more aggressive.

Mind you , this is not from my personal experience with it, but from what I've found out by talking to people about it at various marinas. I haven't used it myself so YMMV.

BTW, as a point of educating a relative N00b... you really should be starting a new thread when you ask a question that is completely off-topic and unrelated to the existing thread. It is considered somewhat rude to hijack a thread as a general rule.
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  #26  
Old 01-27-2007
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You know there is a book I saw at B&N that has several hundred pictures of boats and how to identify them. Quite comprehesive as a one source to see a lot of profiles in one place. It is aranged in order of size of boat. Another thing to do is go to yachtworld and peruse the listings as most have photos and specs. This is certainly a fun part of boat acquisition so make it fun. I remember thr road trips to see actual boats in a 300 mile radius with a stop for lunch and or dinner and perhaps a visit to the towns museum or other local attractions. Always good seafood since most will be in marina towns. Just great fun.
pigslo
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