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Old 02-06-2007
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Thoughts on new Beneteau Oceanis 40

I am planning on buying a sailboat for some coastal cruising around the Mediterranean Sea this summer. I have helped a cousin crew his 50 foot boat before and enjoyed the experience so much that I would now like to buy my own boat to sail with my family. The longest trip I expect to
make would be about a week.

Right now I have my eye on the new Beneteau Oceanis 40 and was wondering if anyone knows someone who has bought one or has any helpful comments. I have been searching the internet for the last few months for comments about the boat but have been having alot of trouble finding anything because it is such a new model. Should I concerned about initial problems with a brand new design? Any thoughts on how this would compare to the Oceanis 423? Finally, how difficult is it to deal with a standard non-furling mainsail if you have electric winches to help out? Right now I am leaning towards a furling design to simplify handling the boat and wanted to know if the time spent learning to use the standard mainsail would be worth the added performance benefits.

I have looked at other models as well and think that based on the price, features and design, the beneteau would be the best choice. The broker has sent me a quote for about $175,000 with all the options I want.

Thanks for your help. I know there are alot of questions within this post but I am glad that I finally found a place to get some answers that are not from a salesman.
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Old 02-06-2007
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With a $175,000 budget you should see fit to keep your mind open. Might want to hear from those who know as per the quality of the Oceanis line compared to other Beneteau models (Jeff H had some good insight on this, I thought). By the way, I have a 27-yea-old Catalina 30 I'd be willing to sell for $150,000. You'd have a boat plus $25,000 "walkin' around money." Needs a new jib, new stove, leaks a little, standing rigging should be replaced, new deck and bottom paint, mast bent "a little," the head smells "weird," but otherwise is in super condition.
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Old 02-06-2007
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S-guy...Welcome aboard. I'm not qualified to comment on your Beneteau but the med is a big place and a week long passage is blue water cruising so I would do everything I could to insure safety as you put the boat together. To my mind that means a mainsail you can deal with if something goes wrong and therefore would suggest either a fully battened OR BOOM furling system rather than in -mast as neither requires you to go up the mast if something goes wrong. The boom furling is a bit pricier than in-mast but it is easier to deal with and allows a good full-batten mainsail instead of a compromised sail. How are you gonna get her home when you're done with the med?
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As far as storage goes, I am going to leave her at a marina in Turkey until next summer. The only other model I thought about was the First 40.7 but I worry about the traveller being in the middle of the cockpit and getting in the way of the people sitting in the cockpit. Also, the First is a bit cramped down below and lacks the water storage I would need for a long trip. Furthermore, I may be sailing with only one other person and would like to have the ease of a furling mainsail rather than having to deal with the large sails of the 40.7. Can anyone who has the 40.7 comment on how hard it is to sail with two people?
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Old 02-07-2007
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A 40' sailboat as your first boat, and one that isn't local to you, is an awfully big committment to make for you. It might make more sense to charter for a few weeks, and then get a smaller boat, back where you live. You don't sound like you've got a whole lot of sailing experience, and unless you have money to burn, keeping a 40' boat where you aren't nearby to do routine maintenance on it is going to get expensive.

Also, cam's point about getting something that is a bit more robust than an oversized coastal cruiser is well worth thinking about. Being a few days from land does mean that you may want to have a bluewater capable boat.
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Old 02-07-2007
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If I had 175,000 to spend I would buy a used boat of a similar size with a higher build quality, like a Tartan or Sabre. It is my understanding that the Oceanis is not Beneteau's highest quality line and I would not consider it a blue water boat, from what I've heard. This summer, I did a similar analysis and bought an old Swan 41 in very nice shape for substantially less money. Not as much room below but relatively fast and built like a tank. Of course, if new and space below is more imprtant to you, the Oceanis could be a good choice.
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Old 02-07-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingguy123
As far as storage goes, I am going to leave her at a marina in Turkey until next summer. The only other model I thought about was the First 40.7 but I worry about the traveller being in the middle of the cockpit and getting in the way of the people sitting in the cockpit. Also, the First is a bit cramped down below and lacks the water storage I would need for a long trip. Furthermore, I may be sailing with only one other person and would like to have the ease of a furling mainsail rather than having to deal with the large sails of the 40.7. Can anyone who has the 40.7 comment on how hard it is to sail with two people?
I have no experience on the 40.7 but have spent some time on a First 42 from the late 80s. My understanding is that the Firsts are considered to be better built boats than the Oceanis and I would feel much more comfortable making blue water passages on a First.
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Old 02-07-2007
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As everybody around here knows, we sail a Beneteau. For us we love our boat. Our model is a 2001 361; Perfect for our needs.

IF your intentions are to use the boat for costal cruising and nothing more, than I would say yes, the Beneteau would make a good fit.
If you plan on someday making open passages, than you should probably consider something else.

Me personally (Even as the owner of a 2001 model), I am not very pleased with the new models. They now have a 40, 46, & 49. It’s just my opinion but the curves they are adding to the coach roof are not aesthetically pleasing. That’s just my opinion.

The newer production boats get a bad rap for their interior build quality, but you are buying a new 40ft. boat for $175,000.00. The same size boat in a Hallberg-Rassey would probably be double that price.

The interior layout looks comfortable and I’m sure it would work well for a family of four or for two couples doing some cruising.


Furling main sails are a trade off. Do you lose some performance? Yes. Are they easy to sail shorthanded? Yes. I have not had any problems with mine. Some will tell you that they are a nightmare in certain conditions; I have never had any problem. Out last year on a calm day when a front blew in bring 30+ knots and I simply rolled her in just as she was intended to do. It has never jammed going in. If you over roll it on the way in and end up with too much of the sail in the mast, it can sometimes jam on the way out, but that is on me or my crew, not any fault of the equipment.

Personally we are starting to look at larger boats. I asked my wife just yesterday if she wanted to some day cruise the South Pacific and the Coast of South America, etc…. Her response was that we are not ready for that just yet. We currently cruise the Great Lakes and in the not so distant future may want to become island hoppers. So for us our search has lead us back to another Beneteau. They fit our needs. But we will not be looking at the new versions, but rather their previous generation from about 2000 – 2005.

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Old 02-07-2007
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Sailingguy123,

If you want info on this model here's the best place to get it. These are people who own these boats and sail them all over the world, not armchair wannabees. I am presently in the Bahamas and can't monitor this site too often but other members in the group will be happy to help you. There is an Italian member who knows the new 40 well. Good luck in your quest.
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/beneteau393/
393 group
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Last edited by Vasco; 02-07-2007 at 09:50 AM.
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Because I plan on being in the area for 2 months and would like to sail for most of the time I am there, chartering does not make financial sense to me. If I am going to pay that much money, I would rather spend the extra money and have a new boat. I do not plan on doing much sailing at my permanent residence so sailingdog's advice about buying something smaller for home doesn't apply in my case.

Also, the originial plan was to get the boat from the French factory and have it delivered to Turkey. I looked at the Tartans and Sabres and althought they are nice boats, I checked yachtworld.com and couldn't find them being offerend in Turkey. There, the majority of boats are either Beneteaus or Jeanneaus, so if I were to go the used boat route, I would most likely get one of those.

Most of the cruising I will do will be along the coast of turkey, usually withing a day or two of a marina so bluewater capabilities are not an absolute necessity.

For around $175,000 and my intended usage, are there any better new 40 footers that are available overseas to avoid a transatlantic delivery?
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