Pearson 30 vs. Cape Dory 25D? - Page 2 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest Forums > Boat Review and Purchase Forum
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #11  
Old 02-12-2007
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Of course, Randy might be a bit biased IMHO...

I'm going to throw another possibility out there... the Alberg 30... it is about the same size interior wise as the Pearson, but is a full-keel, very stable design, much like the Cape Dory 25D, by the same designer—Carl Alberg. Another possible choice is the Cape Dory 30... also, an Alberg designed boat IIRC. I prefer the Alberg 30 over the CD30 for one reason...tiller steering. The CD30 has wheel steering..
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.

Last edited by sailingdog; 02-12-2007 at 06:28 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #12  
Old 02-12-2007
randy capedory 25d seraph
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 87
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
rtbates is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog
Of course, Randy might be a bit biased IMHO...

I'm going to throw another possibility out there... the Alberg 30... it is about the same size interior wise as the Pearson, but is a full-keel, very stable design, much like the Cape Dory 25D, by the same designer—Carl Alberg. Another possible choice is the Cape Dory 30... also, an Alberg designed boat IIRC.
You better know I'm biased toward Cape Dory. Having had my 25D out in 45kts and seeing how she handled it, I was sold on the full keel, narrow hull. That day when it was still only blowing 25-30 I beat both a Benatua sp? 32 and a Hunter 30 to windward by quite a bit. And here's the shocker, they were both using their main and headsail, while I only had my 130 headsail out. And it gets better, they were heading in (too much wind coming they said later). I headed back out and had a heyday. All in my little 25D. And they were both fully crewed, I was singlehanding!

All of Carl Alberg's designs are boats I'd own. He knew how to draw a very seakindly hull.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #13  
Old 02-12-2007
ASA and PSIA Instructor
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Posts: 3,373
Thanks: 6
Thanked 14 Times in 14 Posts
Rep Power: 15
sailingfool will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by rtbates
.....only blowing 25-30 I beat both a Benatua sp? 32 and a Hunter 30 to windward by quite a bit. And here's the shocker, they were both using their main and headsail, while I only had my 130 headsail out. .......All of Carl Alberg's designs are boats I'd own. He knew how to draw a very seakindly hull.
I guess every dog has its day, or moment anyway.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #14  
Old 02-12-2007
PBzeer's Avatar
Wandering Aimlessly
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Cruising
Posts: 19,068
Thanks: 0
Thanked 61 Times in 60 Posts
Rep Power: 14
PBzeer has a spectacular aura about PBzeer has a spectacular aura about PBzeer has a spectacular aura about
Quote:
Originally Posted by rtbates
The 25D is a perfect TWO person boat
While not to dispute the qualities of the CD, they did say a Family of Four, for weekending.
__________________
John
Ontario 32 - Aria

Free, is the heart, that lives not, in fear.
Full, is the spirit, that thinks not, of falling.
True, is the soul, that hesitates not, to give.
Alive, is the one, that believes, in love.
JCP


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
- Website & Blog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #15  
Old 02-12-2007
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 253
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
mgiguere is on a distinguished road
Windy Days

As I recall, LI sound has many more light air days than breezy days. CD is an ocean going vessel...and you're not really in the open ocean. P30 is a real good Chevy...but I would take the rest of winter and check out S&S boats like the Tartan 30 or the C&C 30 (I know not an S&S, but great boat nonetheless). This would put you in the "Buick" level.

Moe
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #16  
Old 02-13-2007
CLucas's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Glen Head, NY
Posts: 407
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
CLucas is on a distinguished road
Send a message via AIM to CLucas
So if a P30 is a "real good Chevy"...

Quote:
Originally Posted by mgiguere
As I recall, LI sound has many more light air days than breezy days. CD is an ocean going vessel...and you're not really in the open ocean. P30 is a real good Chevy...but I would take the rest of winter and check out S&S boats like the Tartan 30 or the C&C 30 (I know not an S&S, but great boat nonetheless). This would put you in the "Buick" level.

Moe
..what is a Catalina... or a Hunter? Not looking for an answer, but go ahead if you feel like chiming in . Good advice and comments all -- I'm probably a bit biased myself towards CD's since that was what I grew up sailing. Stiff as a church but definitely not breaking any speed records. Checked out a squeaky clean CD 25D last weekend -- way too tight for my wife and two young girls. A clean CD 30 is out of my budget.

Looking at 2 comparable P30s - same vintage, *similarly* but not identically equipped -- one with tiller steering and one w/wheel for starters. Of the two, the one with tiller steering has an issue that I believe is resolvable (found someone on this board who went thru this issue - see http://list.sailnet.net/read/messages?id=247108)... Deck around the mast step is slightly depressed (not cracked) - probably a little more than a 1/4", if that. Below, the head liner above the compression post is cracked, as is the hull liner near where the compression post is glassed into the keel (the latter is a 3" vertical crack in the hull liner on the small step going into the head). The base of the compression post (oak), where it is glassed into the keel, is damp and a bit soft (maybe the bottom 3/4"). The boat is wet-stored, and otherwise is bone dry. While I would get it repaired right away, I'm not seeing it as a reason to walk (or run..) away, but instead view as something that I'll factor into my offer should I decide to move ahead. (Ultimately, I'll defer to my surveyor.)

Thoughts?

Last edited by CLucas; 02-13-2007 at 09:32 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #17  
Old 02-13-2007
ASA and PSIA Instructor
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Posts: 3,373
Thanks: 6
Thanked 14 Times in 14 Posts
Rep Power: 15
sailingfool will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by CLucas
......Looking at 2 comparable P30s ....Deck around the mast step is slightly depressed (not cracked) - probably a little more than a 1/4", if that. Below, the head liner above the compression post is cracked, as is the hull liner near where the compression post is glassed into the keel (the latter is a 3" vertical crack in the hull liner on the small step going into the head). The base of the compression post (oak), where it is glassed into the keel, is damp and a bit soft (maybe the bottom 3/4"). The boat is wet-stored, and otherwise is bone dry. While I would get it repaired right away, I'm not seeing it as a reason to walk (or run..) away, but instead view as something that I'll factor into my offer should I decide to move ahead. (Ultimately, I'll defer to my surveyor.)

Thoughts?
Not a good sign to have the bottom of the compression post wet and rotting. My advice would be to get a written repair estimate from a qualified firm (or get the estimates that seller probably already has...) so that if its too large you don't have to walk away from the cost of the survey. My bet would be that the seller is hoping somebody will take this problem off his/her hands...The surveyor is not likely to estimate the cost of a repair.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #18  
Old 02-13-2007
CLucas's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: Glen Head, NY
Posts: 407
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
CLucas is on a distinguished road
Send a message via AIM to CLucas
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingfool
Not a good sign to have the bottom of the compression post wet and rotting. My advice would be to get a written repair estimate from a qualified firm (or get the estimates that seller probably already has...) so that if its too large you don't have to walk away from the cost of the survey. My bet would be that the seller is hoping somebody will take this problem off his/her hands...The surveyor is not likely to estimate the cost of a repair.
The broker is also the dock master where the boat currently resides -- his facility is 100% sail and he claims to have a guy who can do the work there (I haven't checked him out and wouldn't go that route until I saw some of his work or got references). Other work I would have done before taking ownership includes replacing some of the thru-hulls (it's a 1977 hull and some have gate valves which were standard on some Pearsons -- at least one is corroded) and hoses coming off the thru-hulls. Good idea to get a few estimates before making an offer and paying for a survey. If the broker's guy is any good, I could also make my offer conditional on those items being fully repaired.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #19  
Old 02-14-2007
ASA and PSIA Instructor
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Posts: 3,373
Thanks: 6
Thanked 14 Times in 14 Posts
Rep Power: 15
sailingfool will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by CLucas
The broker is also the dock master.... If the broker's guy is any good, I could also make my offer conditional on those items being fully repaired.
You of couerse need to be sensitive to the fact that the broker has a vested interest in seeing that no obstacles arise relative to the sale of the vessel. You might be wise to bring in an outsider, say from another area yard where you could have the work done, to estimates the repairs. I think any actual repair of a boat structure routinely exceeds the best of estimates (double it is my guideline), but if the yard has its own interest in it, watch out.

If the estimates don't send you elsewhere, then the surveyor can advise on whether the estimates cover the approach he/she recommends.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #20  
Old 02-14-2007
paulk's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2000
Location: CT/ Long Island Sound
Posts: 2,476
Thanks: 4
Thanked 15 Times in 14 Posts
Rep Power: 14
paulk is on a distinguished road
In their used boat buying guide, Practical Sailor suggests that the Pearson 30 is a good light-air boat. If you plan on weekending in LIS in the summer, that is what you will need. The additional length will also extend your range and so be able to get you to more places. Hitting the same ports every time because the others are "too far" gets old very quickly. If you have growing childen, this is particularly true. The Pearson's cockpit is also big enough to be comfortable, especially if you can lift the tiller up at anchor. CD's have a reputation for solidity, which is great if you've got 25 knot breezes to deal with. That doesn't happen much on LIS, and motoring is getting more expensive all the time.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Rounding Cape Hatteras John Kretschmer Seamanship Articles 0 04-13-2004 08:00 PM
Rounding Cape Hatteras John Kretschmer Cruising Articles 0 04-13-2004 08:00 PM
Pearson 36 vs C&C 37 dnr Boat Review and Purchase Forum 1 11-16-2002 04:07 PM
The Cape Cod Canal Joy Smith Cruising Articles 0 06-28-2002 08:00 PM
Cape Horn Charter Opportunities John Kretschmer Cruising Articles 0 03-28-2002 07:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:09 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012