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-   -   Herreshoff Marlin 23 in plastic (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/boat-review-purchase-forum/3025-herreshoff-marlin-23-plastic.html)

newuser 01-13-2002 08:27 AM

Herreshoff Marlin 23 in plastic
 
I am looking at a 1965 fiberglass "Herreshoff" Marlin 23. Does anyone out there know where I can find information about this boat, which I assume is someone''s takeoff of the classic Herreshoff Fish Class sloop. I am particularly interested in what the displacement is, who built them, and your opinion.

thanks, Paul Hirsch

Jeff_H 01-13-2002 01:27 PM

Herreshoff Marlin 23 in plastic
 
The Marlin was built by Cape Cod Shipbuilding. They are still in business and I believe they will still build the Marlin on request. The Marlin was a Sidney Dewolf Herreshoff design if I remember correctly. Cape Cod Shipbuilding claims to be the oldest sailing yacht builder still in continuous business: Marlin

The Marlin was not a copy of anything in particular but was an original design for Cape Cod. As a teenager in the early 1960''s, I thought that the Marlin and the Goldeneye (a smaller version of the Marlin) was about as cool a boat as ever existed. I had all kinds of dreams of being able to someday owning a wonderful pocket cruiser like the Marlin and be able to sail all over Long Island Sound and New England. Of course those dreams were 36 years, or more, ago and much has changed in yacht design and my tsate in boats since then. Still, a design like the Marlin still knocks my socks off when I see them and pulls at my heartstrings with the full pull of the romance born years ago.

One word of caution, Cape Cod experimented with leaving parts of the hatches and cabin sides un-gelcoated which let a lot of light down below but which in hindsight would UV degrade the cabin sides pretty badly and undermine their strength a bit over time.

I believe that I actually have original literature on the Marlin in my files but alas I can''t get to my files until we are in the ''new'' house around May or June. I would try Cape Cod Shipbuilding to see if they can help.

Good sailing
Jeff

Cortona 09-15-2008 04:09 PM

I tried to respond earlier But I am not sure the message was posted so here it goes, again.

The Marlin was, and still is, sold by Cape Cod Shipbuilding. In fact, they just finished their first Marlin since '67 or '68 - sold to a guy in Chicago. It was designed by Captain Nat - Nathanael Herreshoff. Originally you could get it in 2 models - a day-sailer - big cockpit small cutty cabin or the cruiser which reverses the cabin/cockpit balance.

Mine, which I recently bought from a good friend was built in 1957 - one of the first 5 Fiberglass hulls. If you go to the Cape Cod Shipbuilding site check out the Atlantic 30 in the one design category - a beautiful boat.

camaraderie 09-15-2008 04:47 PM

Welcome Cortona...only 6 years late on the response...but interesting nevertheless! :D

Cortona 09-15-2008 04:58 PM

Well, I bought a '57 boat - movin' kinda slow all around.

Brodie78 09-24-2008 07:34 PM

Hey Cortona, just saw your message. I have a 1965 Marlin, daysailer version. I'd love to see some pics of your boat and would be happy to share some of mine.

Cortona 09-25-2008 04:16 PM

'57 Marlin
 
Brodie78

Here are a few pics of my Marlin. At the moment she doesn't look this good and I just sent the magneto off to MAine to be rebuilt - still have the original Palmer single cylinder engine - don't ask why, there is no reasonable answer.

I am new to the forum and a klutz with computers so if the pics I thought I attached are still in cyberspace I'll delegate this to Mrs Cortona who is much better withkeybrds and gigabytes.

Brodie78 09-25-2008 04:19 PM

Hey Cortona, I can't see the pics so I'll wait for the Mrs. to post them. At least you have an engine, my boat has a 2 hp outboard that I try to never use as it is loud and annoying, not to mention undersized. I managed to go all season without using it this year. Asym spinnaker helps get me home on those light air days.

Once I get to that ten post limit I'll put up some pics. Trying to find some posts to reply to!

eliotrcutler 04-07-2009 01:58 AM

I have nearly completed the restoration of a Marlin that has been in my family since 1960, and I remain stymied by the pronounced weather helm and whether some adjustments in the rigging might address that problem. Any ideas?

Brodie78 04-07-2009 05:07 PM

The weather helm is a function of the steeply raked rudder post and old-style rudder shape. There are several quick things you can do to help, and a few more major ones.

Easy things:
Reef/ease/flatten the main before the jib. When it's time to reef, I find the boat behaves much better with a reefed main and full jib than the other way around. I have a furling jib so it's easier to just roll up some of the jib but it usually results in more helm.

If it's windy enough to just use one sail, DON'T try sailing with just the main! The boat won't do it. It will, however, sail just fine with the jib only. You won't point terribly well but it can make for a pleasant sail. Try it on a day when it's not too gnarly to see how the boat does. You'll point better the windier it is, if the wind drops to a speed where you need the main, you'll know because you won't be able to sail upwind at all.

More major things:
Shorten the foot of the mainsail...essentially does what putting a reef in does, as far as moving the center of effort further forward. The standard boat has a very long boom as it is (the foot of my main is 11')

Bowsprit...my boat has a 2' fixed bowsprit to move the jib tack forward. Not exactly an overnight project but certainly not beyond the abilities of a good do-it-yourselfer. I can send you pics of mine if you want. I have not sailed a Marlin without a bowsprit so I can't tell you exactly how much of a difference it makes. I do still have a lot of helm sometimes even with the sprit but never so much that the rudder stalls or the boat rounds up. I just heel a lot and slow down if I don't have the boat trimmed properly with the sails.

I suppose the ultimate fix would be to build a new rudder with a more vertical rudder post and more modern shape, but that would be a serious project. I'd love to see what difference it made, though!


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