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  #11  
Old 03-20-2007
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Sound's like you've got the right attitude pj.

I wasn't trying to persuade you and do hope you find a way to begin this boat obscession we all seem to share. I've seen a few new boaters at my marina buy cheap boats and stretch their finances for the first year - only to eventually realize the costs to repair their floating hole in the water wiped out their income and savings.

Their impounded boats are still sitting up in the boneyard - in exchange for uncollected slip fees . . . more costly to repair than they're worth and too costly to dispose of.
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  #12  
Old 03-20-2007
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I bought our last boat in the Seattle area, used Eric Bentzen and thought he did a decent job. You're right, it would make no sense to bring a surveyor from Vancouver and in fact he may well have problems crossing the border to do a job that many americans are qualified to do.

There are plenty of surveyors in your area, any that belong to their society are probably competent.
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  #13  
Old 03-20-2007
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Patience is a virtue pj. Don't let yourself get too caught up in the "first bargin" you find. Just remember, as with most things, you get what you pay for. Though it's somewhat hard to define, as it means different things to different people, what you want is a good "value", rather than a bargin. To find a good value will require some searching, but I have no doubt there are some available in your area.

Good luck in your search,
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  #14  
Old 03-20-2007
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Thanks faster... Don't know the PNW all that well...thought Vancouver was closer than that...or at least that was the way my better half made it sound when she lived in Seattle.

There are plenty of boats... what you might want to do is go out and see if you can sail on a few different ones... by volunteering as crew at local yatch clubs and see if you can get a better idea of what you're looking for in a boat.

One word of wisdom—with boats, it is often worth spending a bit more money to get a boat that needs less work, since the work you put into the "least expensive" of the boats is generally far more than the price difference was initially. For example, if you look at the cost of repairing a low-priced Alberg 30 and compare it to the price of one in good shape, the price difference is far less than the cost of bringing the low-end one up to snuff. Also, you will get far more enjoyment out of it, if you can sail it and have to do less work. Getting a fixer-upper as your first boat is almost always a huge mistake for most people.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #15  
Old 03-20-2007
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pj

By now you should be getting the idea that a "deal" is not always truly a good deal. For example last year my son bought a very nice Ranger 29, well equipped and a much better boat than the US 29 for under $10K US. Take your $4000 and do some work you won't take long to get up in the area close to 10 K.... and more time spent fixing than sailing.

The inevitable resale will go much easier with a boat of better reputation and obvious quality. 2 foot-itis will bite you at some point.

There's usually a reason for an unusually low price/value put on things.
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  #16  
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what you are saying makes a lot of sense. I did here about a questionable pedagree with the US 29. I think that I will still go down and look at the boat and take it out of the water. The haul out cost is only 250 with pressure wash. At the very least It will be money spent on a lesson (what that lesson is will not be clear until I go and see); perhaps the deal of a life time or rather an example of what to avoid! After i see the boat I will post some questions in the spirit of learning and try to make sense of the lessons I will seek to learn. I am feeling better going in with the advice posted here. I leave tomorrow (at the very least it will be an interesting road trip!)
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  #17  
Old 03-20-2007
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If I may be so bold, I think that you can get a better boat. Look for something in the 24 to 25 foot range that is listed around 6 or 7K on a For Sale By Owner website. Call them up, go see the boat, explain you don't have a lot of money and then offer them what you have. They will turn it down, but if you are polite, they will not be offended. Don't stand there and try to tell them how flawed the boat is and how they are never going to get asking price, just be honest, tell them you're broke but really need to sail. 90% of boat owners have been in that position at some point. Leave your number with them, they may well think it over for a couple of days and call you.

The brand of boat that you are considering is not known for great quality. It is too big to be maintained affordably. Sails are going to cost much more than they would for a smaller boat. If the diesel goes tits-up in a couple of months and needs repairs - it's going to be many hundreds if not thousands to fix it...I could go on forever.....(and sometimes do )

If you get a smaller boat with an outboard, you are going to be able to afford something in better condition, that you can more comfortably afford. A well-built 24 or 25 foot boat is far more seaworthy than a questionably put together 28 footer.

Regardless of what you buy - and I am sure that you are going to buy something - you're going to end up putting money into it. Better to invest in something that will give you the chance to recoup a little if (when) you sell.

Good luck! ... but really, really think twice before settling on that particular brand....
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  #18  
Old 03-20-2007
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If you take sailormann's advice... I would still recommend getting survey done... and making the offer and sale subject to the results of the survey. Some owners may not want to do this if they are giving you what they feel is a break in the price.
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Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #19  
Old 03-21-2007
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I opted for getting a 24 footer after doing some calculations on expected maintenance costs. A boat over 20 ft for that kinda money is gonna need some work, period. I had a budget near yours and found a few boats that fit the bill nicely. I choose the one that required electrical work, cause I can do that myself. You may have different skills. Time will tell if I made a good choice but don't be paralyzed with the possibility of making a mistake and have all the fun go out of the exprience, good or bad.
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  #20  
Old 03-21-2007
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Just remember one thing—boats get smaller exponentially... a boat that is 28' long is really much bigger than one that is 24' long. It isn't 17% bigger, as you would guess but more like 60% bigger. This is because boats have volume...and as the length increases, so does the width and height generally.
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Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
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Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
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