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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum
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  #11  
Old 04-23-2007
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Gata42-

Most seaworthy boats are narrower and have less room than more modern, less seaworthy designs. For the same LOA, a bluewater boat will have significantly less "living" space inside. The reasons for this are due to the nature of boats, and how the beam of the boat affects the seakindliness of their motion. It will also generally be built to a heavier scale and will displace more than a coastal cruiser of the same LOA, so the ground tackle and such needs to be larger.

A large salon is great at anchor, but trying to make your way across it, when the boat is heeled 30˚ and pitching in a storm is a pretty good way to get hurt. The wide, very large double berths you see on most coastal cruising "floating condo" type boats is great, until you get hit by a storm on a long bluewater passage and get thrown five feet across the boat.

It would probably help if you actually went out to see some of the different boats we've mentioned above. The differences are usually pretty obvious, more so in the smaller boats than in the larger ones IMHO.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #12  
Old 04-24-2007
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gata42 is on a distinguished road
We are going to head down to St. Pete. and over to St. Augustine in the next few weeks and look at some first hand. This information is great and gives me more things to think about and helps me know what to look for. Thanks everyone.
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  #13  
Old 04-29-2007
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After some research I think a coastal cruiser is better suited for our needs. The longest we plan to be at sea would be 7 days max, unless Murphys law kicks in. I plan on being in St. Pete. in two weeks to look at some boats. Does anyone know of any boat shows coming up that are located in Tampa, St. Pete. or Daytona to Jacksonville?
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  #14  
Old 04-29-2007
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Seven days at sea is bluewater. You need a bluewater boat if that is your plan. If not...change plans. Bahamas and Caribe can be done in much less rugged a boat...EXACTLY where do you get 7 days from??
Here's a list of seagoing boats to keep you busy:
Mahina Expeditions - Boats to Consider for Offshore Cruising

Here's a list of power and sailboat shows around the country by month...you just missed a couple.
New and Used Yachts For Sale - Motoryachts and Sailboat Sales - Bollman Yachts - Upcoming Boat Shows

If you want to look at used sailboats...go to miami or ft. lauderdale and visit brokers there...you'll see WAY more than in st. augustine or jacksonville or st. pete.

Last edited by camaraderie; 04-29-2007 at 09:40 PM.
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Old 04-29-2007
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Valiente has a spectacular aura about Valiente has a spectacular aura about
The main tradeoff is that shallow draft boats suitable for some of the skinny water of the Caribbean tend to make a lot of lee and can be uncomfortable in the Atlantic. Exceptions are centerboard keelers, bilge keelers, full keelers and catamarans/trimarans.

Of course, there are lots of good boats with an under six foot draft, but if you are looking around 38 feet or so, it's a little tricky finding a fin keeler, the currently dominant sort of modern production cruiser, with much less than that.

Another issue, of course, is tankage and stowage. You can have a flat-bilged performance cruiser in the Caribbean if you are never going to have more than 50 gallons of diesel and 70 of water. But that's not going to take you across the Atlantic, and might have an uncomfortable movement in open ocean conditions.

You might wish to look at two books (you can skip the technical parts if you wish) that have proven their worth through many editions:

Amazon.com: Desirable and Undesirable Characteristics of the Offshore Yachts (A Natical Quarterly Book): Books: Stephen L. Davis,John Rousmaniere

Amazon.com: Adlard Coles' Heavy Weather Sailing: Books: Peter Bruce
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A few general points to consider:

1) The less sailing experience you have the smaller boat you should get. If you have very little or no experience consider sailing lessons. You and your SO should take separate lessons.

2) Newer is not necessarily better. You will probably find you can get more bang for your buck with an older boat. Boats don't age like cars - buying a 20 y/o boat is not like buying a 20 y/o car.

3) Don't forget about the costs associated with boat upkeep. Everything will be more expensive with a larger boat. The cost of upkeep tends to rise geometrically rather than linearly with regard to size.

4) The simpler the boat the less time and money you will spend in upkeep and the more time you spend sailing.

5) Here's a few suggestions I have for your reading list:
Sensible Cruising: The Thoreau Approach
Nigel Calder's Cruising Handbook: A Compendium for Coastal and Offshore Sailors
Cruising Under Sail

Personally, I believe most cruising dreams are derailed by getting too large or complex a boat rather than too small or simple a boat. Also, sail every chance you get on as many different types and sizes of boats as you can is as many different conditions and locales as possible.

YMMV,
Sam
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  #17  
Old 04-30-2007
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JohnVigor's The Seaworthy Offshore Sailboat is also a good book to read.
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New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #18  
Old 04-30-2007
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This is the kind of boat you may want to consider as a base from which to start:
click or cut and paste the link below in your address bar:
YachtWorld.com Boats and Yachts for Sale

This particular boat listed above is exactly everything you need. They have done all the work, all the upgrades. It may seem like a lot of coin to shell out right away, but this boat has everything for a bargain price. You could but this boat tomorrow and leave for anywhere after you stocked up on beer and a few bottles of wine of course. No jokes.

goto yachtworld.com and spend a few minutes checking out these kinds of boats:

Pacific seacraft
Bristol Channel cutter
WestSail 32 (dont make these either anymore)
Spencer 35 (dont make em anymore but they are phenomenal)

just to name a few. There are also some excellent books out there that I would start with too. "twenty small boats to take you anywhere". While you may not be looking for a small boat, it gives you ideas on what to look for in a larger vessel and how to budget.

Lynn and Larry Pardy have excellent cruising books out too. Nigel Calder has good technical advice.

Also, while many people shy away from ferro cement, they are phenomenal boats when built properly. You get mega (I mean mega) bang for buck in a standard approved and surveyed while built ferro boat. there is no other hull out there that will ever last as long or take a beating as well as a good ferro boat. Be very careful when buying one, make sure it has an accredited and professionally built hull.

Cheers.
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  #19  
Old 04-30-2007
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Getting a ferro boat insured is very unlikely today... They stopped using ferrocement as a building material in most places because it has some serious flaws a building material.
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Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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