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-   -   Silly Newbie survey question... (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/boat-review-purchase-forum/32439-silly-newbie-survey-question.html)

thomaskennedy 05-13-2007 09:00 PM

Silly Newbie survey question...
 
Guys,

Some thing just occurred to me. I'm about to have a boat surveyed and it's been hauled for about a year. It was pickled for winter- sails stowed, bilge dry, engine winterized etc.

Do I need to do anything prior to the survey and sea trial?

keep in mind, I've never been accused of being all that bright.

Thanks,

-TK

eherlihy 05-14-2007 08:34 AM

Presumably you are making an offer on the boat....

If you are still happy with the boat after the survey, I would make any offer contingent upon the boat passing a sea trial, and engine inspection & trial. Both of these require that the boat be in the water.

I would specifically pay careful attention to the condition of all the tanks: water/fuel/holding (looking for gunge and critters / nests in all the wrong places) and plumbing, hose clamps, looking for dry rot and the condition of the clamps. I assume that the surveyor will be checking all of the seacocks and thru-hulls...

The engine SHOULD have had the oil and all filters changed, and maybe even the coolant, as part of the pickiling. Make sure that the oil, at least was changed.

What was done with the batteries? They don't like sitting unused for long periods of time.

The next biggie for a boat that has sat for a season, at least to me, is the charging system. Have the surveyor check the voltage at the rectifier (part of the alternator), at the batteries, and at the distribution panel.

Good luck!

Ed

Wendy 05-15-2007 05:27 AM

I just went through this process as a buyer. If you are the buyer, you really won't have to do a thing other than write checks- of course you will have to pay the surveyor and you will also be expected to pay the round trip charges on the Travelift. If the seller is there, he or she will operate the boat during the sea trial. You are really just along for the ride.

The surveyor will inspect the engine and associated systems- hose clamps, filters, fluids, etc- but will most likely not "survey" the engine itself- that requires a diesel mechanic and the survey report should note that. Electronics will be powered up and checked for proper operation, plumbing gone through, hull and deck sounded with a phenolic hammer and checked with a moisture meter. The rig will be inspected, sail condition noted, etc etc.

After the survey is done, you should get a verbal rundown on what the boat's condition is. Everything will be catagorized- "ER" means essential repair, "RR" means recommended repair, and so on. A written report will follow which the lenders (if any) and the insurance underwriters will want a copy of should you decide to proceed with the purchase. It's an interesting process- good luck with it!

Wendy

VENRICO 06-18-2008 04:39 PM

We are in the process of getting a 38' or 40' central cockpit Beneteau - 1997. I'm familiar with Beneteau quality, but would like to here some opinions about Hunters.

We want to live aboard and in a couple of years take off from Tampa Bay area to who knows where.

TAK 06-19-2008 12:43 PM

TK..
If you are the buyer.. the seller will need to commission the boat for the surveryor to go over everything.. That means the motor needs to be running - all systems flushed, sails rigged etc.. If you are the seller thats what you need to be doing.

teshannon 06-19-2008 12:55 PM

tk,
If the boat is still winterized and you are the buyer, if you don't buy the boat you will have to pay the cost of rewinterizing it if the seller insists on that.

TAK 06-19-2008 01:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by teshannon (Post 331051)
tk,
If the boat is still winterized and you are the buyer, if you don't buy the boat you will have to pay the cost of rewinterizing it if the seller insists on that.

I suspect that is negotiable .. if the seller wants to sell his boat he will assume the responsibility of making it showable. Typically you will need to pay launch and lift fees.

teshannon 06-19-2008 01:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TAK (Post 331058)
I suspect that is negotiable .. if the seller wants to sell his boat he will assume the responsibility of making it showable. Typically you will need to pay launch and lift fees.

Probably true but only if you negotiate it up front. Once the deal has fallen through he'll rightfully want to recover his costs.

Stillraining 06-19-2008 01:42 PM

Guys...The origional post is over a year old..he probably passed on the boat as he never responded...However there is a new question from VENRICO..about Hunters...I have no experience with them so cant help....Good info otherwise...:D

VENRICO...It might be better to start a new thread next time about your specific questions rather then revive a dead thread...Just a thought... as half of the respondents are not going to read past the first post or two befor making there response...something that bugs me to no end sometimes..:)

teshannon 06-19-2008 01:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Stillraining (Post 331072)
Guys...The origional post is over a year old..he probably passed on the boat as he never responded...However there is a new question from VENRICO..about Hunters...I have no experience with them so cant help....Good info otherwise...:D

VENRICO...It might be better to start a new thread next time about your specific questions rather then revive a dead thread...Just a thought... as half of the respondents are not going to read past the first post or two befor making there response...something that bugs me to no end sometimes..:)

You're right, missed that. Slow day at the office here.


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