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  #11  
Old 05-17-2007
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If I wanted to do what you intend to, I would do it in this:Luperon Yacht and Property Sales - Irwin 38 Sloop - Dominican Republic
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  #12  
Old 05-17-2007
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how about

A cal 40

fast cheap and can go anywhere
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  #13  
Old 05-17-2007
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One sleeper would be the old Hunter 37 cutter, built in the late 70s. They can be had for $30-40k in decent shape. They are fairly well respected. Don't know about 3 adults on it however.

For some reason there are quite a few C&C 38 out there cruising around the world.

How about a Newport 41? I would put it in the coastal cruiser category but I would have thought that about the C&C too.
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Old 05-17-2007
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Great info, thanks all I've got a lot larger list of boats to consider... any compromise will definitely be my safety over the comfort of my guests...

and no, I don't require 3 separate cabins for 3 adults. A double berth a single berth and enough room that everyone is not standing on top of each other is fine. The intent is to enjoy the surroundings, not hole up down below.

A Cascade 36 is available not too far away in Portland, OR. Seems that it may be up to the task of bluewater cruising, but I'm having trouble coming up with any info on handling characteristics... I haven't been down to look at it yet all I know is that it is 36ft LOA, relatively narrow beam (10ft), cast iron fin keel, hydraulic steering and around 13000lb displacement.

Seems that it would work, but I can't find any information on how seakindly they are... Anyone have any experience with them?
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Old 05-17-2007
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I believe the Hunter he's talking about is the Hunter Cherubini 37 specifically. Most of the other ones from that era are less than stellar.
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  #16  
Old 05-17-2007
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Quote:
A Cascade 36 is available not too far away in Portland, OR.
Cascades are designed and built for long-distance cruising. They are sold in various stages of completion, ranging from bare hulls to factory finished. Good boats if you get one that is well built. The hulls are strong, but you need to inspect the interior very carefully if it was finished off by the purhcaser.
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Old 05-17-2007
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Check out this CS36, it looks perfect and is already outfitted for cruising.
YachtWorld.com Boats and Yachts for Sale
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Old 05-18-2007
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I don't know a lot about steel boats, is there a such thing as a moderate displacement steel hull, or are they pretty much all heavy displacement?

I saw a 24 foot steel boat that weighed 9,000 lbs. with a go-fast tall rig this winter. Yes, that's heavy displacement, but it shouldn't hold it back. The concept of "heavy displacement" is a moving target as all boats have tended to get lighter over the years. But my steel 41' cruiser is 24,000 lbs. and a Catalina 42 is nearly 20,000, so I'm "moderate" for steel, and the Catalina is "moderate" for fibreglass.

Or am I a little skewed in thinking that larger displacement boats tend to require more effort when singlehanding?

That depends on hull shape, sail set and area and a few other factors. Some boats are "driven" easily in that they track well and have a "kindly" motion (non-puke-producing) in a seaway. Others are plain fast, and frequently squirrelly in that they are "tender" and must be actively sailed. If you are going to cross oceans solo or with one crew, you would tend to gravitate to the "slow but steady" type of boat that can largely steer itself and has a more modest sail area. All boats should do their hull speed in 25 knots: a lighter boat will do it in 14 knots, while the heavy one will want 20. Ease of use on the ocean means less time on deck reefing and shaking out, meaning you want to keep up a full hoist as long as you can. That and tankage/stowage argues for a more commodious boat....particularly in your price range.

And I guess I should have stated from the outset that my purchase budget is around 80k total (fitting included) and I'm hoping to come in well under that but I could stretch for "the right boat"

Yachtworld.com is your friend. Simply alter your parameters and consult books like "Desirable and Undesirable Characteristics of Offshore Yachts" and "Heavy Weather Sailing", as it's a Good Old Boat, rather than a new "hot rod", that is most likely in your future.
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Old 05-18-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TSteele65
Here's a nice steel-hull cutter for you:

YachtWorld.com Boats and Yachts for Sale

The price is a little over your budget, but she looks to be fairly well outfitted.
Not bad...it looks vaguely C&C-ish in the spoon bow. Worth a look for rust, though. A metal boat surveyor is a must.
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Old 05-18-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sailormann
Cascades are designed and built for long-distance cruising. They are sold in various stages of completion, ranging from bare hulls to factory finished. Good boats if you get one that is well built. The hulls are strong, but you need to inspect the interior very carefully if it was finished off by the purhcaser.
Cast iron keels need close watching as well.
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