The Real Cost of Ownership - Page 2 - SailNet Community
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post #11 of 79 Old 06-14-2007 Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by T37Chef
Have you given any thought to chartering?
Do you mean in place of buying a boat? I have been with friends that have chartered in the Virgin Islands a couple of times and it is ok, but certainly not the same as having your own boat. I am planning on staying down in Exuma for months at the time just enjoying my retirement.

Can someone please clarify if they really believe if I spend $50,000 - $60,000 on the initial purchase, whether a newer boat or an older boat and then spend what it takes to get her up to speed, can I realistically get by on $3,000/year AVERAGE for maintenance for 5 -10 years or so? That is probably as long as i will physically be able to sail, if I am lucky. I will be on a fixed income and I don't want to bite off more than I can chew and this end up being a nightmare instead of my dream retirement.
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post #12 of 79 Old 06-14-2007
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Did not realize you intended on living aboard for months. So of course chartering is out, the thought was based on your comments about DIY items.

Boat = Bring out another thousand

Cheers,
Shawn

S/V Windgeist
1982 Tartan 37C

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Last edited by T37Chef; 06-14-2007 at 11:19 PM.
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post #13 of 79 Old 06-14-2007
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Outside of a major problem like an engine failure, I think you can more then get by with $3000.00 in maintenance cost, if your willing to do some of the work yourself. a lot of the work isn't hard to do but takes time, lots of time. Your retiring, will have lots of time so I would welcome something to do. Varnishing teak in paradice sounds like a good plan to me.

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I had a dream, I was sailing, I was happy, I was even smiling. Then I looked down and saw that I was on a multi-hull and woke up suddenly in a cold sweat.
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post #14 of 79 Old 06-14-2007
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Remember: Cruising is defined as fixing your boat in exotic places. You have to be prepared to foot the bill there too!

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post #15 of 79 Old 06-15-2007
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If you have 50K to spend, I would suggest you buy a 15 to 20K boat and put 30K into it. My reasoning is that 30K is just about enough to replace everything on a 28 to 30 foot hull. 5K on electronics, 3K on the galley, 6K on sails, 10K on an engine, 4K on rigging and 2K on electrical.

The new gear that you put on to your older hull, will be under warranty, and there will not be any hidden issues for you to deal with. You'll know the history of everything. 3K should be enough to maintain it. The first few years your costs will be much lower, but they will increase so if you average it over ten years, 3K should be comfortable...

You really need to think hard though about whether or not you are willing to learn to maintain things yourself. You definitely do not have the budget for yard maintenance. It is not difficult at all to learn, but it is a necessity that you understand how the boat works and how to fix things when (not if but when) there are problems. You can't call a yard techie when you're twenty miles offshore...

T37's suggestion re: chartering is a good one. I think that should be your first move - find out if you like living on a boat before you take the plunge...

I would not suggest that you put your money into a Catalina. They are not bad boats, but there are stronger hulls out there that were not produced in such large numbers. I think you might find it easier to recoup the investment in a beautifully refit Triton, or similar boat that is in demand. At any given time there are 250 Catalinas for sale, and most of them will be cheaper than yours. Someone looking for a Triton (or similar boat) in good shape though, will appreciate the fact that you have refit the boat and be more likely to pay you for the upgrades.

Last edited by Sailormann; 06-15-2007 at 12:30 AM.
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post #16 of 79 Old 06-15-2007
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Since you are looking to buy at boat in 2 years - I would suggest buying a cheap 25-27 now. You say that you are taking sailing lessons and looking to crew... why not on your own boat?

It will give you the chance to learn how to maintain a boat, what issues you have with spending multiple days on it (and what you might like about it), and in the end the price won't have gone down if it is maintained.

Old sailboats only get so cheap. I purchased my '78 Hunter 25' for 2.5k (listed at 5k). My friend purchased an older Ranger 26 for 3.5k (listed at 5.5k). Both boats could easily be sold for what we got them for, and based on the cosmetic work we have done... perhaps a bit more.

In the end - the only way to know what you want in a long term cruiser is to spend a long(ish) term on the boat. Nice thing is it doesn't have to break the bank. Look for a deal and don't sink money into it - just time and effort.
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post #17 of 79 Old 06-15-2007
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IMHO, Sailormann has hit it on the head, his post is much the reasoning behind what I posted earlier. Getting a less expensive older boat will leave you enough to outfit it the way you want yourself. And in doing the outfitting you will learn quite abit about the boat and how to maintain it.

If you are not willing to learn how to do repairs and maintenance on your boat, then I would highly recommend you choose some other form of retirement. Unless you have the skills, most of which are not difficult to learn, to maintain and repair most of the minor, but regularly-occuring, issues on a boat, you have to be fairly wealthy to own a boat.

Waxing, polishing, touching up varnish, repairing scratches in the gelcoat, and such is all a regular occurrence. Fixing small problems, like a clogged head, or replacing a masthead light fixture are fairly common examples of tasks that you need to learn to do for yourself.

Sailormann's point about there being no one to call when you're out at sea is a very valid one. There's a common saying on boats—"At sea there is no plumber"—meaning that if you have a plumbing problem, it is up to you to fix it.

Sailingdog

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post #18 of 79 Old 06-15-2007
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Urro...given your budget and your plans I think that getting an older Cat30 will be just about perfect for you. Your major liability AFTER surveying the boat and making sure rig/sails and hull are fine will be the engine. Get a separate survey of the engine and make sure you can trust it.
As to ongoing costs, you will need to haul and paint the bottom once a year so you need to plan for 1000-1500 to get that done...then there will be other failures along the way...heads, hoses, heat exchangers,pumps, etc. and can all add up but I see no reason why allocating around 3k a year as a maintenance budget shouldn't work out.
Despite your reluctance...you NEED to be able to handle basic stuff yourself like changing fuel filters and bleeding injectors and rebuilding your head or you WILL eat up your budget. I suggest that taking a basic diesel course (see MackBoring.com) is equally important as your sailing lessons as you will spend FAR more time motoring than sailing AND you will need some understanding of 12V systems as well since solar/wind/battteries will become extremely important to you at anchor in the Exumas or Abacos.
You don't ned to be an expert...just know enough to be dangerous and help yourself when no other help is available.
Another thing...carry a FULL ENGINE SPARES kit as well as spares for all other important systems as getting stuff shipped into the Bahamas will kill you both in time and expense. Good luck!
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post #19 of 79 Old 06-15-2007
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$1000 to $1500 for a haul and paint ? I'll admit that I do things myself. I'll also admit that I live in a very expensive place, New Jersey. I know many things are cheaper elsewhere. A Bottom haul with me buying the paint and doing the work is about $600.00.

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I had a dream, I was sailing, I was happy, I was even smiling. Then I looked down and saw that I was on a multi-hull and woke up suddenly in a cold sweat.
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post #20 of 79 Old 06-15-2007
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I don't like "rule of thumb" decisions as it does not take into account the wide range of conditions that boatsare in. If you are careful in your search and purchase, you may find the identicle boat in better condition for less money. Blows the estimates away. I recomend gathering info on various recurring mainentance expenses and then choose a boat with as many recently completed as possible and buy accordingly. As the schedule rolls back around (and it will as sure as the sun will rise) you can be prepared financially or learn how one item at a time.
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Last edited by pigslo; 06-16-2007 at 10:22 PM.
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