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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum
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  #11  
Old 07-15-2007
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Got the boat a 35 foot full keel motorsailer CC. Working on a few upgrades, mostly my sailing skills and plan a circumpacific trip in a few years. Untill then Hawaii to Alaska to California.
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  #12  
Old 07-18-2007
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Amazing how popular 28' boats for circumnavigation

I am very surprised at how many feel that a 28' boat is ideal for a circumnavigation. I would have thought a larger boat would be more suitable, if only for the consideration of supplies.
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  #13  
Old 07-18-2007
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28' is nothing! Last fall I spent a month on a 26' boat and it seemed plenty big enough. Granted, I was soloing, but you certainly don't need a 50' yacht to see the world, (sorry Dad). The boat I was on was a Frances 26, built by some company in the UK, but designed by Chuck Paine. Great little boat, I put on 2500 miles going to Kauai and the rail never once got wet. Very sturdy little thing, double ender, flush deck, super cozy cabin. Terribly designed cockpit, (sorry Chuck) but a dream to sail. The owner was planning to sail it from Hawaii to Australia with his wife last Christmas, but chickened out and sold it to some guy from the islands.
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  #14  
Old 07-18-2007
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I have been clamed to have more balls than brains more than once but given the chance I would try it in a cal 29 with minimum extras oh I would say about 20,000 total investment and one other person. but with the first statment in mind I have had my 1978 macgregor 22 out on lake michigan in 35 plus knot wind with small craft advisorys out not because I did not know it was coming but because I knew it was. but I do not recomend that anybody follow my lead because I fall into that catigory of young dumb and full of well you know the rest.

ps I might be able to get the 20 grand any up for the trip

Last edited by dodgeboatguy; 07-18-2007 at 03:42 AM.
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  #15  
Old 07-18-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MalDeTerre
I am very surprised at how many feel that a 28' boat is ideal for a circumnavigation. I would have thought a larger boat would be more suitable, if only for the consideration of supplies.
28-32 is ideal for single-handing, and 32 is adequate for a couple who actively sail, like a Westsail 32 or an Ontario 32. Boats around the 30 foot mark are cheaper to own, to maintain and to run, and the physical stresses of sailing are less in some cases. The shortcomings are stowage and tankage, of course, but you'd be surprised at how much room there is in a full keeler.

I now own a 40 footer in steel, but there's myself, my wife and a lively boy who will likely gain 18 inches in height while we travel. I wouldn't go bigger, because we are about at the limit of what my rather compact wife can physically handle. She can't put the sail cover on, for instance, until I install mast steps.

Another couple I know are among the tallest people I know in the sense that the man is six-two and the woman is six-three! They are on a Niagara 35 as liveaboards and seen quite happy and are planning extended Caribbean cruising.

Better a little tight in a boat you can handle than whizzing about the vast cabin of a boat that's beyond your abilities.
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Old 07-18-2007
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The previous..

The previous owners of my CS36 did cruise it, with two people, but I think it would be a little small for my taste. My boat has been to South America, The Caribe, Newfoundland, Labrador, Nova Scotia the entire Eastern US, Central America and through the Panama Canal to the West Coast and Islands of South America and Central America and more. I have no doubt the boat can handle it, and she's already outfitted for it, but as big as she is for a 36 it's still to small for me. I'm thinking more along the lines of a Passport 42...

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  #17  
Old 07-18-2007
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I agree with Halekai, for two to four people on an extended cruise I would be looking for something in the 40-42' range. Probably a Brewer, or Hallberg Rassy if I could afford it.
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  #18  
Old 07-18-2007
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Nobody ever seems to talk about the old Sundeer line on this forum, but I would love to have one for that trip.
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  #19  
Old 07-18-2007
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The larger the boat, the larger the costs... and in many foreign ports, the bigger boats are seen as prime targets for theft...where a lot of the smaller boats won't be bothered. Also, the size of the boat really depends on how many people are going to be on it on a continual basis. If you are single-handing or sailing with just your spouse, then a 28-35' boat is probably ideal... if you normally have another couple or teen-aged kids aboard, you probably want to go bigger.

Also, Valiente's point:
Quote:
Better a little tight in a boat you can handle than whizzing about the vast cabin of a boat that's beyond your abilities.
is a valid one... especially if you sail as a couple and one of you gets injured... a larger boat might be too difficult to handle in heavy weather by yourself, where a smaller boat can often be dealt with.

As an example... look at Ken Barnes, who was on a 44' steel ketch, and got rolled most likely because he didn't have the boat set for the heavy weather. Same storm, a bit further away, was grandmother Donna Lange on a Southern Cross 28, who did just fine. The 44' steel ketch is currently being used as a condo for fishies.... the Southern Cross is probably sitting at her dock ATM. Granted, a lot of this has more to do with the sailor and how well they've prepared themselves, than the boat. But, some problems on a large boat are just more difficult, because the equipment is just that much larger and heavier. Brute force or multiple people are generally needed...which is often not the case on a smaller boat.
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Last edited by sailingdog; 07-18-2007 at 11:49 AM.
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  #20  
Old 07-18-2007
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Don't confuse an incompetent skipper on a poorly designed large vessel with the advantages of a proper larger vessel captained by a properly prepared sailor.
I would much rather go to sea in a Tayana 37 singlehanded than in Donna's SC28. My guess is that if given the choice...she would too. Nothing wrong with a small well designed boat but I would always opt for the biggest well designed one I could handle safely.
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