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  #21  
Old 07-18-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by camaraderie
I would much rather go to sea in a Tayana 37 singlehanded than in Donna's SC28. My guess is that if given the choice...she would too. Nothing wrong with a small well designed boat but I would always opt for the biggest well designed one I could handle safely.
I would agree only if I had done the preparation and had spent enough time on the Tayana 37 to know it well....otherwise, I'd rather take a smaller boat I am extremely familiar with and know inside and out, over a larger boat that I am a stranger to.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #22  
Old 07-18-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog
I'd rather take a smaller boat I am extremely familiar with and know inside and out, over a larger boat that I am a stranger to.
I would tend to agree with this - but being "very familiar with" the boat or not, I would not even consider sailing across an ocean in a 28 foot trimaran, over doing so in say . . . a 33 ft Nauticat.
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  #23  
Old 07-18-2007
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LOL... spoken like true MOTORSailor...


Quote:
Originally Posted by TrueBlue
I would tend to agree with this - but being "very familiar with" the boat or not, I would not even consider sailing across an ocean in a 28 foot trimaran, over doing so in say . . . a 33 ft Nauticat.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #24  
Old 07-18-2007
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Heh - heh . . . at least it doesn't have training wheels.
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  #25  
Old 07-18-2007
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Lot of competing considerations here. Living aboard for 5+ years, I want comfort. Sailing around the world means some major crossings and safety and stability are huge factors; that really has to come first. But there are some sidebar arguments to be had about how best to address that. Speed can be a safety feature. A long monohull or a multihull will get you across faster and therefore expose you to less danger. But the multilhull has the worst case scenario of a capsize going against it (yes, I know, very unlikely, but it isn't going to self right if it ever happens) but they are fast enough to run from weather systems. The longer monohull is generally going to be more complex to handle and more expensive to purchase and maintain. I think part of the allure of smaller boats is that they can seem stouter (they certainly have less leverage against their ends) and are potentially easier to self rescue. When I munge it all together, my answer is another vote for a monohull in the 30' neighborhood.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MysticSkipper
But the multilhull has the worst case scenario of a capsize going against it (yes, I know, very unlikely, but it isn't going to self right if it ever happens) but they are fast enough to run from weather systems.
A multihull may capsize, but they rarely sink...since the position of ultimate stability for a multihull is capsized... however, the position of ultimate stability for a keelboat is sitting upright at the bottom of the ocean... Most of the time you hear about capsized multihulls and the horror stories because the crew has survived to tell it... how many monohulls sink without a trace and without any survivors???

The speed of a multihull, especially the larger production cats, some of which are fairly poor in terms of sailing abilities, generally isn't significant to outrun a fast moving storm system without significant advance notice. On average, a cruising multihull will only move a bit faster than her monohull counterparts.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #27  
Old 07-18-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog
A multihull may capsize, but they rarely sink...since the position of ultimate stability for a multihull is capsized... however, the position of ultimate stability for a keelboat is sitting upright at the bottom of the ocean... Most of the time you hear about capsized multihulls and the horror stories because the crew has survived to tell it... how many monohulls sink without a trace and without any survivors???

The speed of a multihull, especially the larger production cats, some of which are fairly poor in terms of sailing abilities, generally isn't significant to outrun a fast moving storm system without significant advance notice. On average, a cruising multihull will only move a bit faster than her monohull counterparts.
Maybe I over generalized here, but most of the records for fast crossings are held by multihulls:
World Speed Sailing Record Council
and the ones that are held by monhulls are at much lower speeds.

Your points about ultimate stability are quite valid, though. Sometimes I wonder if the little boats, like Matt Layden's Paradox:
PARADOX
with positive bouancy and chine runners are a reasonable alternative. They get knocked over pretty easy, but bounce right back up. But they go slow and carry very little and force you to live in a box not much bigger than the one we are trying not to occupy anytime soon.
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  #28  
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MysticSkipper-

While the majority of the records are held by multihulls, I seriously doubt that anyone is going to go cruising in one of the record setting beasties.

It is very difficult to mistake these two types of boats, and the performance characteristics are completely different. First photo is of a cruising catamaran, second of Ellen's B&Q record-setting trimaran. Not quite the same thing. The record-setting multihulls are not very comfortable as cruising boats.





Quote:
Originally Posted by MysticSkipper
Maybe I over generalized here, but most of the records for fast crossings are held by multihulls:
World Speed Sailing Record Council
and the ones that are held by monhulls are at much lower speeds.

Your points about ultimate stability are quite valid, though. Sometimes I wonder if the little boats, like Matt Layden's Paradox:
PARADOX
with positive bouancy and chine runners are a reasonable alternative. They get knocked over pretty easy, but bounce right back up. But they go slow and carry very little and force you to live in a box not much bigger than the one we are trying not to occupy anytime soon.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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Last edited by sailingdog; 07-18-2007 at 03:19 PM.
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  #29  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog
MysticSkipper-
While the majority of the records are held by multihulls, I seriously doubt that anyone is going to go cruising in one of the record setting beasties.
But aren't the monohull records also held by boats designed to go as fast as possible? The America's Cup boats don't look especially comfortable. Adding the amenities slows them down also. I keep seeing references, here and elsewhere, to cruising multihulls blowing right by monohulls. Speed is a page one feature on most of the multihill builder sites. I think it is a fair statement to say that a cruising catamaran with roughly the same capacity for people and gear will generally go faster than a monohull. My preference is still monohull, but speed is a point I concede to the mutlihull.
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I'm not disputing that most multihulls will have a higher average speed than monohulls of the comparable capacity, and definitely higher speeds than monohulls of comparable LWL.

However, touting it as a way to "outrun" bad weather isn't really realistic IMHO. It will help you avoid some bad weather, but some storm systems crop up quickly enough, move fast enough and are large enough that they can't be avoided, regardless of whether you're in a monohull or a multihull.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MysticSkipper
But aren't the monohull records also held by boats designed to go as fast as possible? The America's Cup boats don't look especially comfortable. Adding the amenities slows them down also. I keep seeing references, here and elsewhere, to cruising multihulls blowing right by monohulls. Speed is a page one feature on most of the multihill builder sites. I think it is a fair statement to say that a cruising catamaran with roughly the same capacity for people and gear will generally go faster than a monohull. My preference is still monohull, but speed is a point I concede to the mutlihull.
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New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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