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Old 07-16-2007
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I Bought A Boat-Now What?

Well friends, I have been posting for a little bit. I have skippered a couple of bareboat trips. Now my wife and I are the proud owners of a 1982 CAtalina 25 pop top. When at anchor, the hatch/coachroof lifts up via 4 small hydraulic lifts(similar to what is on a screen door).
It has a 1999 Honda 4 stroke with electric start. Roller furling. Sails are from 2001 and in great shape. The boat is in excellent shape. $8000.00

We purchased it at Sodus Bay NY. A little east of Rochester on Lake Ontario. Should I let the broker register it for me? I am taking a personal loan for the money. No lien. Do I need insurance? What other questions do I have for the broker or owner? I need to go through the canals to get it to Cayuga Lake(my home sailing area). The boat is in the water now.
I have to take the mast down. Is 125.00 a proper fee?
Can I do it myself? What about putting it back up? The wife says just pay, don't be so cheap LOL.
Also, I don't even know where I will put it? Dock or mooring ball. I do not have a dinghy. Any thoughts there? I have no trailer, but it comes with a steel cradle for storage. Do I store it at the lake, or bring it home for the winter?(in the driveway).
Sorry for the random questions ?
Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks! All of your help in the past has, in a small way, made this happen!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Old 07-16-2007
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Did you get the boat surveyed and sea trial it before you bought it??? I hope so... but in any case, on to your questions.

Are you registering with the state... if so, find out from their website what the fees are, and if the broker isn't ripping you off, let him do the legwork and register it... it isn't that difficult to register a boat with the state as a general rule—much like registering a car.

Yes, I would get insurance for it...especially as it is your first boat, you'll have some "mistakes" more likely than not.

The Catalina 25 was originally designed as a trailerable IIRC. Taking the mast down should be something you should be able to yourself, either by using a ginpole or a-frame based mast raising rig. If you don't have one, making one is relatively easy and not too expensive to do. However, I would have them do it the first time and recommend you closely watch to see what they do. Ask them to explain why they're doing it if you can.

As for where to put it. During the season, you'll find it most convenient to have it at a marina slip/dock. This makes getting off and on the boat the simplest. A mooring ball may be cheaper but you would need a dinghy unless the marina/yatch club you're keeping it has a courtesy launch or tender.

Winter storage... you would probably store it on the cradle at the marina. If you had a trailer it might make more sense to store it in your driveway... but without a trailer, once the boat is on the cradle—you would have to pay someone to haul the cradle to your home and back to the marina in the spring. That doesn't really make much sense.
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Old 07-16-2007
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No sea trial, no survey. I asked for a sea trial, and he told me no one ever gets a sea trial. Looking back, I can see my first 2 mistakes. I am going to call the local marina and look into a survey now. I have 72 hours to cancel the deal in needed.
would it be okay to add something to the contract?--subject to survey and sea trial----?
Sorry for noob questions.....
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I doubt it. It is very unlikely that you can retroactively add the conditions of a survey and seatrial...

But a survey at least is generally recommended, since a survey can often spot things like a delaminating deck, which is a fairly expensive repair and can make the boat unseaworthy. A good surveyor can also give you an idea of whether the boat is worth the asking price, or if the price should be adjusted based on the results of the survey. Many people think that a survey isn't worth doing on smaller boats, that only go for <$10,000...but if the survey discovers the deck is delaminating, it could save you from a very expensive repair job....

Finally, if you were to get a survey, using an independent surveyor, not recommended by the broker is probably a very good idea. You want the surveyor to have your interests as his primary concern—generally the surveyor that none of the brokers will recommend is the guy you want.

Most good surveyors are booked several weeks in advance, so YMMV.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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Last edited by sailingdog; 07-16-2007 at 07:44 AM.
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Sorry to be such a bad news bear, but, I just did a quick search for catalinas in that size range on Boats Used Boat Sales - boats.com. The price of $8000 seems a bit high, based on the prices I'm seeing there. The boat may be fine, but I wouldn't want to take the broker and seller on just good faith about it. The boat may be worth more than the $8,000 you are paying for it... but it sounds like you've got some doubts in the back of your mind... and those doubts are usually caused by something you saw or felt about the boat but haven't consciously recognized.

A majority of the boats are listing for $8000 or less, and if you paid the asking price, you've pretty much overpaid by a good chunk in 99% of the cases. Generally, selling prices are a good deal lower than the asking price. The asking price on your boat was $8500... from what I am seeing in the Boats.com listings.

BTW, you say the sails are from 2001 and in great shape... how do you know??? Are you a sailmaker and can tell by looking at them or are you taking the broker's word on it? Many sails can look fine, but be blown out. Given that this is a relatively small boat, sailed for the summer season on a freshwater lake, they're probably okay, but I just thought I'd ask...
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Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.

Last edited by sailingdog; 07-16-2007 at 07:58 AM.
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Old 07-16-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 42ndstreet
No sea trial, no survey. I asked for a sea trial, and he told me no one ever gets a sea trial.
No one ever gets a sea trial, eh? Who told you that, the broker and/or seller, perchance? I'm getting a sea trial. It's happening directly following the haul-out survey, so the surveyor can accompany us on the sea trial. The seller grumbled, but he's going along with it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 42ndstreet
Looking back, I can see my first 2 mistakes. I am going to call the local marina and look into a survey now. I have 72 hours to cancel the deal in needed.
would it be okay to add something to the contract?--subject to survey and sea trial----?
Sorry for noob questions.....
The selling broker should have presented you with a contract like this: http://www.oceanmarinellc.com/broker...eAgreement.pdf - which is what I was given, except mine mentions "survey and sea trial."

Somebody posted at some point, not long ago, perhaps in a thread I started, about how they'd not had a survey done on a boat they'd bought for $2000 because it was so little money and such a deal, or something like that. Well, IIRC, they ended-up regretting that, as it cost them another $12k to fix the boat.

This boat may be wonderful. May be in wonderful condition and just what you want. Then again: Maybe not. You don't really know, do you? Personally, my policy is never to gamble more than I can afford to lose, and $8k is a helluva lot more money than I can afford to lose.

Coupled with the fact that you seem to have no idea what you're going to do with this boat once you have it, my suspicion is you're jumping into this just a mite too fast, with way too little knowledge.

On the other hand: I'm an exceedingly, sometimes annoyingly, methodical person.

On the gripping hand: When I "do my thing," I rarely end up suffering buyer's remorse.

Good luck.

Jim
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New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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Old 07-16-2007
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Cancel the DEAL and then rewrite it subject to survey AND trial.
The broker MUST present the offer to the owner AND you should walk away if either are refused. There are lots of Catalina 25's and it looks like you got no great deal anyway.
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Old 07-16-2007
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You better believe you need insurance--- Most marinas in my experience REQUIRE insurance, especially liability insurance. Without that, you may be risking a lot more than your $8000 purchase price. A smal accident, such as many other new boat owners have had, and a sharp lawyer could take you to the cleaners. If you can still cancel the purchase, do as someone above reccommended, write a new contract including sea trial and survey. Even if you are a registered marine surveyor, an outside unbiased opinion is worth the cost. Boat U S will not insure without a survey -- does that tell you something?
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