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  #1  
Old 08-10-2007
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Opinions wanted on Bayfields

I have been looking around and I came across a couple of Bayfields that I really like. I am looking at either the 29 Cutter or the 25'. They have the look of a bluewater boat but are they really? does anyone own a Bayfield on sailnet? I would be interested in your opinions. I really like the Pacific Seacrafts the bayfields seem to have a little lower price for the boat.
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Old 08-10-2007
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They have been discussed in at least one previous thread in some detail. I recommend a search for 'Bayfield', then maybe reviving the thread with specific questions. (IIRC the consensus was that they are bluewater capable)
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Old 08-10-2007
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The Bayfields count the bowsprit into their length, so a Bayfield 25 is comparable to a typical 23 as far as LWL, cockpit, deck and cabin space is concerned. Likewise, the Bayfield 29 is more like a 27. That may be why the prices seem lower. When compared to a boat of equivalent LWL, the Bayfields costs are usually the same or higher.

It's said that we are attracted to people for their qualities but we love them for their faults. The same may be true for our boats and you'll find that most owners will rate their boats 8/10 or higher (mine is a 9). More objective opinions may come from someone who owned one in the past but not presently.

Some reviews here:
http://sailquest.com/market/models/bayf25.htm
http://sailquest.com/market/models/bayf29.htm
http://www.cymagazine.ca/onlineExclu...usiveKeyword=6

Where's the blue water in Wisconsin?

Last edited by CapnHand; 08-10-2007 at 02:20 PM.
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Old 08-10-2007
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Bayfields appeal to those who like the "shippy" look, the teak taffrails, the clipper bow, cutter rig etc - the "cute" factor, I guess.

They are not going to go to weather very well, will handle rather poorly under power, esp in reverse. As mentioned they are smallish for the length, at least until you get up into the 36/40 foot versions.

On the plus side they look good if you like that look and don't mind keeping teak on deck, generally shoal draft, fullish keel and attached rudder if that's what you're after.

The designer, Ted Gozzard has a good eye for the type, and has produced similar boats outside the Bayfield name that command good prices. Newer/larger models have more cutaway in the hull profile that should enhance handling.
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Old 08-10-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CapnHand View Post
thanks for the links! I will be sure to check these out.

As far as blue water in WI, There may not be but I think I would like to take it out of the inland seas one day.
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Old 08-10-2007
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I think of these as character boats, intended to have a swashbuckling appearance rather than being true bluewater boats. My recollection is that these boats have comparatively little ballast compared to their drag and displacement. Frankly, from what I know of the Great Lakes, you need a boat that can deal with changeable conditions, gusty-choppy as well as light air, and these boats would be poor at either end of the spectrum. They have a rep for being reasonably well constructed but the discussions that I had with a fellow restoring one suggests that the rep may be higher than they deserve.

Jeff
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Old 08-10-2007
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I would agree with Jeff

Bayfields are one of those boats where the sizzle may be better than the steak. Construction is ok for boats made at that time but nothing special. Note that the Gozzards are a different matter completely. They are very well-built and equipped but priced accordingly.

Performance up to 29 feet is not very good. Have a friend with a 40 who has sailed to Europe and the Caribbean a couple of times and thinks that it is a lot of boat for the money. Had another friend who took a 32 from the Great Lakes to the Caribbean but had it shipped home by truck since the performance with the small engine it had was brutal. Later boats had larger engines.

Never seemed to me that a boat is traditional if it has fg trailboards.
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Old 08-10-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff_H View Post
I think of these as character boats, intended to have a swashbuckling appearance rather than being true bluewater boats. My recollection is that these boats have comparatively little ballast compared to their drag and displacement. Frankly, from what I know of the Great Lakes, you need a boat that can deal with changeable conditions, gusty-choppy as well as light air, and these boats would be poor at either end of the spectrum. They have a rep for being reasonably well constructed but the discussions that I had with a fellow restoring one suggests that the rep may be higher than they deserve.

Jeff
What would be a good boat for the Great Lakes?
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Old 08-10-2007
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Originally Posted by Stryker72 View Post
What would be a good boat for the Great Lakes?
You're going to have to provide more parameters than that, but in the broadest possible terms, something reasonably stiff but light enough to handle the prevailing light westerlies. Yesterday, we had a long fetch easterly at 20-25 knots, and a few Hunters and Catalinas were getting plastered in the six foot square waves. The C&Cs and the J-Boats just cut through it with single reefs in the main and 25 degrees of heel. My own boat, a steel cutter, was making six knots under staysail alone and probably pitched more up and down than heeled to either side (about 15 degrees).

But that isn't typical unless you use the whole season (late April to late October). Most of the time it's 10 knots or less.
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