Will my wife and I be sad or happy with a Nauticat 33 or 38 or similar type? - Page 4 - SailNet Community
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post #31 of 42 Old 09-05-2007 Thread Starter
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I wish I could afford one!

HI DonLund!

Thanks for your response! This is a very expensive boat. I wish I could afford one!

Thanks!

TartanGreek



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I saw where Island Packet have the SP Cruiser motorsailor. It was reviewed recently in Crusing World or Blue Water Cruising. I believe the review was favorable. Cant remember the cost.
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post #32 of 42 Old 09-06-2007
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Multihulls

TartanGreek,
If You're considering multihulls, You should have a look at the Dragonfly's they sail extremely well, and a Dragonfly 920 participated in this years ARC Rally. Look at the standard, not the Extreme version. It sails particularly well and looks beautiful too. I've had the chance to crew on some of them, although never could afford one myself Btw. Paul Elvstrřm used to own one of the Extreme versions, that should speak for itself? Hope they're available at a decent price where you live. Good luck and enjoy the search.
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post #33 of 42 Old 09-06-2007
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Joms-

The problem with Dragonflys and trimarans in general is the lack of space. The main hull is narrower than a monohull of the same LOA and the amount of interior cabin space is generally about two-thirds to half that of of monohull of the same LOA. IF that isn't a deal breaker, then by all means look at the Dragonflys. However, the folding system on the Dragonfly leaves a bit to be desired IMHO. It extends the length of the boat, so the cost of docking a folded Dragonfly is more expensive than it should be and the boat tends to be harder to manuever when folded since the rudder effectively moves from the stern to a quarter of the way into the boat.

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Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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post #34 of 42 Old 09-06-2007
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It's been a busy week and I just caught this thread. TB has covered most of your questions but I'll add what I can. I have a '99 331 that is only different from TB's in a few respects. I (the 331's that started in '99) have built in seats to form a small 'cockpit' at the aft steering station. I have confirmed many times that my 75hp Yanmar can exceed the 7.1 hull speed easily - but expensively. On a recent motor to Block Island against the wind on the nose, tide, and little 2' chop it purred nicely at 2300 rpm to achieve that 7.1 through the water speed and a flick of the wrist and a gurgle of the fuel tanks (160 gal) brings it up to the mid 8's. That flick of the wrist also will maintain a fairly easy 6-7 if you are fighting wind blown steep 5 footers all day at the high 2000's (Yanmars prime). The well over 100 gal of water kept us showered (separate shower on mine) for the week. You do need the 8-12kts. of wind you mentioned to do any enjoyable sailing but especially with the AutoProp I have, motorsailing is a speedy way to get there. Sailing is for 'day sails' on the Bay and 'motor sailing' is for cruising vacations for us.
Now for the down side - The cost since the Euro has beat up the dollar is well into the obscenity range I paid 210k for mine 2 years ago in Annapolis and that was a very good price Also, there just aren't any 331's around. I have been subscribed to Yachtworld's notification system since before I bought mine and it just so happens one showed up today in England - a 2001 for 300k. I have not seen any in this country. That's why I jumped at mine when I saw it. So for a 33 you may find an occasional late model modified fin keel like TB's but most are full keelers with less than good sailing characteristics.
Just a comment on the Fishers - They make the NC's look light and fast.

Stan
'Christy Leigh'
NC 331
Wickford/Narragansett Bay RI
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post #35 of 42 Old 09-06-2007
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Well said Stan.

Enjoy your 331, knowing you've got the cream-of-the-crop 33 Nauticat - the results of Nauticat designer's extensive retooling/redesign of a venerable classic.

True Blue . . .
sold the Nauticat
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post #36 of 42 Old 09-07-2007
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Dog,

While I agree with you on interior space, I'd say that the Swing Wing folding system is the smartest I've seen and used on any multihull. Measured against interior space and comfort basically nothing compares to the NC33(1)'s, so I think that a Nauticat is a great choice for most people (the oldest versions excluded). I sail a monohull myself (and have only owned monohulls) but I really enjoy sailing on multihulls, and the Dragonfly's seems to me to be a great balance between interior space and speed.
With regards to the NC's IMnsHO they're a bit on the heavy side, but TB has covered the pro's and con's of that?
(Now I need to go and buy a NC for Cruising and a multihull for racing! Pls. send $$$ for that project)

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Joms-

The problem with Dragonflys and trimarans in general is the lack of space. The main hull is narrower than a monohull of the same LOA and the amount of interior cabin space is generally about two-thirds to half that of of monohull of the same LOA. IF that isn't a deal breaker, then by all means look at the Dragonflys. However, the folding system on the Dragonfly leaves a bit to be desired IMHO. It extends the length of the boat, so the cost of docking a folded Dragonfly is more expensive than it should be and the boat tends to be harder to manuever when folded since the rudder effectively moves from the stern to a quarter of the way into the boat.
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post #37 of 42 Old 09-07-2007
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You might want to check out the folding system on the Telstar 28. It doesn't cause the problems that the folding system on the Dragonfly does—doesn't change the effective position of the rudder or lengthen the boat when folded. Also, doesn't shift the center of buoyancy on the boat, as the Dragonfly system does. BTW, I wouldn't recommend motoring for any distance with the amas folded on a dragonfly...
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Dog,

While I agree with you on interior space, I'd say that the Swing Wing folding system is the smartest I've seen and used on any multihull. Measured against interior space and comfort basically nothing compares to the NC33(1)'s, so I think that a Nauticat is a great choice for most people (the oldest versions excluded). I sail a monohull myself (and have only owned monohulls) but I really enjoy sailing on multihulls, and the Dragonfly's seems to me to be a great balance between interior space and speed.
With regards to the NC's IMnsHO they're a bit on the heavy side, but TB has covered the pro's and con's of that?
(Now I need to go and buy a NC for Cruising and a multihull for racing! Pls. send $$$ for that project)

Sailingdog

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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
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her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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post #38 of 42 Old 09-07-2007
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You might want to check out the folding system on the Telstar 28. It doesn't cause the problems that the folding system on the Dragonfly does—doesn't change the effective position of the rudder or lengthen the boat when folded. Also, doesn't shift the center of buoyancy on the boat, as the Dragonfly system does. BTW, I wouldn't recommend motoring for any distance with the amas folded on a dragonfly...
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Dog,

While I agree with you on interior space, I'd say that the Swing Wing folding system is the smartest I've seen and used on any multihull. Measured against interior space and comfort basically nothing compares to the NC33(1)'s, so I think that a Nauticat is a great choice for most people (the oldest versions excluded). I sail a monohull myself (and have only owned monohulls) but I really enjoy sailing on multihulls, and the Dragonfly's seems to me to be a great balance between interior space and speed.
With regards to the NC's IMnsHO they're a bit on the heavy side, but TB has covered the pro's and con's of that?
(Now I need to go and buy a NC for Cruising and a multihull for racing! Pls. send $$$ for that project)

Sailingdog

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Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
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Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
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post #39 of 42 Old 09-07-2007
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Dog,
Let's not hijack this thread - Let's just agree that we disagree
The Telstar's swing mechanism looks nice though.

TartanGreek,
Sorry for discussing this here, hope it helps You in deciding what to buy anyway! I'll just repeat that the newer versions of the Nauticat 33's and the 331 are really nice boats.
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post #40 of 42 Old 09-07-2007
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The pre-1980 Nauticat 33s had different deck configurations, had a wooden sided pilothouse and lacked the signature aft helm seen on later models. The aft helm is of course, essential for access to sail rigging while underway.

True Blue . . .
sold the Nauticat
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