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  #11  
Old 09-15-2007
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Try searching for "dutch canal boat" and you'll get plenty of hits, in English. I'm not sure what Idiens is thinking of, but a flat-bottomed shoal-draft Dutch sailboat, designed for sailing in shallow seas is not suitable for inland waterways.

"can the masts come down on these boats" Yes, typically you rig primer cord around the mast and detonate it, then cut the rigging clear with wire cutters. Or you find a yard with a crane, and pull the mast.

" but I wouldn't think it impractical for a ship that would sail the ocean "
Ships are defined generally as more than 100 feet long. Smaller craft are "boats". No offense, but I think you've got a blurry romantic picture of "things that float" without the details pencilled in. What is comfortable at sea, what is practical at sea, what is comfortable to live in, and how to live in a space smaller than a travel trailer, are all very different from barge boats and canal boats.
Do some internet searches on "barge boats" and "canal boats" and "inland waterways of Europe" or wherever you plan to go, and just believe that there are real reasons why people are not using other kinds of boats. Or, take sailing lessons and then charter the kind of boat you think you can use--and you may find out why it isn't being used that way.
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  #12  
Old 09-16-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SUBMITGUY505 View Post
This southerly boat looks to be about perfect. Thanks for replying to my thread....
The Southerly's are fine for shoal draught around the North Sea coasts but not much use for the majority of canals with low, non-opening bridges, as their masts need a crane to remove.

I thought the question was for a sailing boat that had little draught for use on the canals. That's why I suggested you look at the boat (scow?) that I linked. Look at the pictures, it sails, it has shallow draught, it has a mast in a tabernacle and an A-frame to lower and raise the mast any time you want to. It will also have an engine and tankage enough for canal use, because that's what the Dutch do inland. I would not chose such a vessel for ocean cruising, but they have been used for that, and they are very good coastal craft and can handle the nasty chop of the North Sea.
But if you don't want to sail (and you can't much on European canals) then get a motor boat or a converted barge. Again, I would recommend Holland as a source for those too. The wealth of choice there is considerable.
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  #13  
Old 09-16-2007
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But you can find them in the US too...;

http://yachtbroker.escapeartist.com/...635/index.html

Try searching for Tjalk (the boat type) in

http://www.botenbank.nl/

Last edited by Idiens; 09-16-2007 at 11:35 AM.
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  #14  
Old 09-17-2007
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Inland bound

I noticed you have a requirement of fast for your boat.Sail boats are not what you call fast.excluding the cats,but even they are not really fast.I agree you will do no sailing on a canel and in fact will have to travel with the mast down and tied to the boat because of bridges and such.Good Luck with your dream.
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  #15  
Old 09-17-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Umm... you're not going to get space, speed, safety and a shallow draft in a single boat as a general rule. An Alberg 30 is one boat I can think of that two people could liveaboard, and IIRC it has about a four-foot draft.

However, it really sounds like you want a small catamaran, like a Catalac 8M. This would give you shallow draft, lots of space, fairly good turn of speed and is pretty safe. The Heavenly Twins 26, the Iroquois MkI or MkII, the Gemini are other catamarans that might fit the bill as well.

Most monohull sailboats, that have a shallow draft have to either give up storage or safety for the shallow draft. Most won't be less than four feet in a shallow draft version, and the few that are may be too small for two people or way out of your budget, like the Shannon Shoalsailor.

All four of the catamarans I've mentioned have made Atlantic crossings, but have a board up draft of less than two feet IIRC.
Multihull beam and inland waterways ? Does that compute ? Many of the canals in the UK and Ireland may not be wide enough.
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Old 09-17-2007
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Many of the smaller catamarans are fairly narrow.
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  #17  
Old 09-17-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Many of the smaller catamarans are fairly narrow.
You mean like a monohull with really big bilge keels??

--Cameron
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  #18  
Old 09-18-2007
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Those Dragonfly trimarans are cool. Their folding anas (sp?) would fit down most canals. Not sure they fit in the desired price bracket though.
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  #19  
Old 09-18-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Idiens View Post
Those Dragonfly trimarans are cool. Their folding anas (sp?) would fit down most canals. Not sure they fit in the desired price bracket though.
As a trimaran owner, I can tell you that trimarans have far less room than a monohull of the same LOA.

The other problem is that the Dragonfly folding system causes some maneuverability problems by extending the effective LOA of the boat when folded and essentially moving the rudder from transom mounted to five or six feet forward of the effective stern. The Dragonflies aren't really designed to be motored with the amas folded IMHO.
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  #20  
Old 09-18-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
As a trimaran owner, I can tell you that trimarans have far less room than a monohull of the same LOA.

The other problem is that the Dragonfly folding system causes some maneuverability problems by extending the effective LOA of the boat when folded and essentially moving the rudder from transom mounted to five or six feet forward of the effective stern. The Dragonflies aren't really designed to be motored with the amas folded IMHO.
Dog,

Yes, the Dragonflies get a little longer when folded, however they're still very stable and can be motored around while walking around on them w/o issues. They were designed with that in mind. Just note that ANY tri that folds shouldn't be sailed while folded! However I also like the folding mechanism of the Telstar 28 that you mentioned in another post! (Don't think the Telstar looks as hot as the Dragonfly though )
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