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  #41  
Old 09-29-2007
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Val-

I could have a few friends liberate some of those motors from a certain boat in Rhode Island for a small finders fee and have them shipped to you...


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Marine grade Val - motors are OEM units still in perfect condition, but I needed to replace the arms and blades. I was fortunate to find a local marine supplier with a stash of brand new units in stainless steel. Even though they were on display in his consignment warehouse - all were in unopened factory boxes.

Got them for about $8.00 ea. I'd tell you where, but then I'd have to kill you.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #42  
Old 09-29-2007
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Impressive! I need to install at least two.
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  #43  
Old 09-29-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrd22 View Post
Valiente- We have a hand operated wiper that works very well even here in the PNW where we get a lot of rain. Usually one swipe every once in a while does the trick, unless it's really coming down hard. Cheap and easy to install option.

Hand-Operated Windshield Wiper (Straight Blade)
Shopper Rating: Not reviewed
Read/Write ManufacturerMFG Part #WM Model#PriceIn Stock?QtyAFI31000256693 Only $56.99 USD YES DescriptionChrome-plated brass handle
Includes stainless steel 8 inches x 12 inches adjustable wiper arm, 11 inch blade, and all parts for installation
Economical-an inexpensive alternative to wiper motor kit
Requires 7/16" diameter hole for installation
Can be installed up to 7/8" thick material
For use on flat windshields only
Thanks for that tip. I figure I'd want a motorized one for the starboard fixed glass (in front of the wheel) and maybe two "hand wipers" for the opening center screen and the fixed port screen.
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  #44  
Old 10-10-2007
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A little late to the discussion but I wanted to weigh in a little. I spent over a year looking at various sailboats and finally walked into a Cooper 416 and knew instantly that this was the one. Before that point a PH was not even a consideration in my mind. I was immediately impressed with the feeling of space inside and the amount of natural light flooding through. It was almost surreal compared to walking into the dark confines of most of the other sailboats.

I also expected that the boat would not sail that well and was equally suprised to find that she would kick up a gallop and perform quite admirably - managing to hold her own against the Hunters and Beneteaus plaguing the waters. The Cooper and as noted before, the Sceptre are fairly sleek NW designed PH's and don't compromise too much by way of having a huge house on deck. Definitely much more sailboat than stinkpot.

I have to admit though that so far I have done most of the navigating in the outside cockpit. The sightlines from the inside are not as good. Especially here in the PNW I am completely paranoid about staking her bottom on a deadhead - especially since I stripped her gel bottom off and replaced with epoxy.

Now again having said that I remember on my first offshore passage, while wrapped and huddled in my mustang suit, freezing my ass off at 3am, in the centre cockpit of a glorious 70fter that wouldn't it be nice to be able to steer from inside the boat with at least some visibility. Afterall, late at night when you are on watch and it is unrealistic to look for logs, containers and whales you are mainly looking for navigation lights and peeking at your radar which can all be done from inside the boat if you have a PH.

I defintely plan on going offshore with my Cooper 416 and I also plan on making the necessary altercations such as adding plexiglass storm covers on all the windows and locking latches on the floor compartments inside. As far as I'm concerned it is a win-win situation. If you want to be outside you can, and if you want to be inside you can. I think on some PH's you are pretty much stuck inside all the time and this was not something that interested me at all.

Alas, beauty is in the eye of the beholder and the person who is drier and warmer.
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  #45  
Old 10-10-2007
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I just spent 2 days going from SF to Santa Barbara on a 47' Brewer designed pilothouse sloop. I was curious about the pilothouse before and after this trip, having sailed largely just on typical aft cockpit boats.

Background: we did a straight shot down the coast, winds about 15-30kt gusting to 35, 2 sets of 6-10 swells coming from NNW and W, mostly clear but cool conditions with some showers thrown in. Outside bimini with minimal dodger just over companionway.

PH Pro's:

- In a serious downpour, nice dry place
- Bright
- Breaks up the interior, so if someone is napping on the settee downstairs you can still hang out in the pilot house w/o disturbing them
- Lots of room in bilges for engine, tankage and storage
- Easy handholds when moving forward on deck, and flat foredeck

PH Con's:

- Breaks up the interior, meaning more steps to clamber around on, and breaks things up socially when everyone is trying to be in the same place. Space wasted on stairs and extra bulkheads, and system redundancy.
- Watching the horizon appear and disappear through the side windows every 1.5 seconds can be a bit nauseating (I have video I could post if someone wants to see)
- Nobody actually used the interior steering station. All sailing and motoring was done from the cockpit. It just didn't seem intuitive, even when it was raining (bimini mostly took care of that).
- Tons of windage, forward and laterally
- Area down of the pilothouse (galley, staterooms and heads) a bit dark since the pilothouse blocks much of the light, and more difficult to get to

Some of these attributes I'm sure are specific to this boat, but I think its a pretty typical pilothouse design.

In the end, I feel that unless live in the far north and have to deal with < 50 degree weather all the time, there is nothing in a pilothouse design that I wouldn't rather be doing in either the cockpit or traditional cabin. If weather is a big deal maybe just get one of those 360' dodgers.

On the other hand if I could find a boat that I loved and it came with a sleek, minimal pilothouse, I wouldn't disqualify it solely for the pilothouse.

Last edited by wakked1; 10-10-2007 at 04:44 PM.
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  #46  
Old 10-10-2007
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Wakked, I am not going to challenge your pros and cons, as I had to balance off the same concerns. Some pros, however, in favour of the pilothouse include the following:

A place to keep the electronics dry. I can have a regular LCD screen and a laptop handling the chart plotting that I can see from the deck.
A place to confine the wet gear outside of the living areas, not to mention a place in which to change clothes/boots.
A place to keep a coffee or soup warm without disturbing the galley.
A place to retreat for socializing when you want to still be "outside" but it's too cold or damp.

Lastly, the option of an engine bay over a compartment with 360 degree access to various systems was too good to turn down. I will remove the pilothouse roof in a couple of weeks and disconnect the engine. Then a hook and winch on a Polecat truck will hoist the engine straight out for service, and I will put "the lid" back on for the winter, allowing me to prime and paint in all weathers with only a couple of ceramic heaters to keep the interior toasty.

I don't think they are a good idea for the casual sailor, but for the distance cruiser, it's like having a super cockpit that can take green water.
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  #47  
Old 10-11-2007
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There are not many professional ships that do not have pilot houses and most of us drive cars that can be closed up when it rains. Only some sailors, bike riders and pedestrians think it is manly to brave the elements while travelling.

Now racing, that's a different matter. F1 cars are open cockpit as is Giu's dream machine. So if you want a large crew to dash about the deck doing extreme things fast in all weathers - get a large open cockpit (and really good oilies).

Pilot houses are about comfort and maximising the liveable area on a boat.
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  #48  
Old 10-11-2007
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TB, if i could afford that NC(385?) you posted a pic of, the PH would not be an issue. Beautiful looking boat! I doubt I need it in the ChesBay, though.
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  #49  
Old 10-11-2007
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here's another pilothouse option, a coastal cruiser with no pretensions of being a bluewater boat, I love the dual steering option. Nimble kodiak, 26'4", trailerable.

craig
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Old 01-13-2008
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Northsea 34

Jrd22 I am interested in your photos and your experience with your North Sea 34 built by Beaverglas boats in Richmond. There is one for sale here in BC that I am interested in. Cheers!

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Mine is a 1978 Northsea 34 made in BC by Beaverglas Hulls based on an English design by Colvic (I think). John
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