Seeking Vintage wood ice breaking - SailNet Community
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post #1 of 11 Old 11-06-2007 Thread Starter
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Seeking Vintage wood ice breaking

ship! Last seen dropping off Explorers near the north pole sometime after (before?) the turn of the 18th century! Will make offer after survey! Some maintenance issues are expected!

Denise, Bristol PA, Oday 30. On Tidal Delaware River, Anchor Yacht Club.
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My last project!
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My boat is sold!
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post #2 of 11 Old 11-06-2007
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You must be mighty bored Denise.
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post #3 of 11 Old 11-06-2007
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You are looking for the Fram. The strongest wood boat ever built and a veteran artic explorer. Designed and built by Colin Archer for Fridtjof Nansen's 1893 Arctic expedition. She was also used by Otto Sverdrup, Oscar Wisting, and Roald Amundsen between 1893 and 1912. She is currently laying in Oslo.
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Study the history of naval architecture and move forward knowing what didnít work before.

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post #4 of 11 Old 11-06-2007 Thread Starter
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Wow Robert! are the pictures of it anywhere?

I was thinking of The Scott expedition ship. That sunk right? The ice crushed it?

Denise <--- clueless historian

Denise, Bristol PA, Oday 30. On Tidal Delaware River, Anchor Yacht Club.
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My last project!
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post #5 of 11 Old 11-07-2007
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http://www.coolantarctica.com/Antarc...ships/fram.htm

http://www.fram.museum.no/en/

We are not primarily on earth to see through one another, but to see one another through

Some people are like slinkies: not really good for anything... but you can't help laughing when you push them down the stairs
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post #6 of 11 Old 11-07-2007
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Quote:
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Wow Robert! are the pictures of it anywhere?

I was thinking of The Scott expedition ship. That sunk right? The ice crushed it?

Denise <--- clueless historian
Are you thinking of Ernest Shackleton and his 1914Ė1916 Endurance Expedition. The Endurance was trapped by the ice and sunk. Shackleton then made a remarkable small boat voyage to organize the rescue of his crew.
All the best,
Robert Gainer

Study the history of naval architecture and move forward knowing what didnít work before.

Donít waste time making the same old mistakes but instead make new ones and to insure your place in history be sure the mistakes are big ones.

Never design a mast that is weaker then the boat
Never design a boat that is weaker then the mast

Never listen to someone describe why your project will not work unless they can show you the broken pieces of their own version.
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post #7 of 11 Old 11-07-2007
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If you ever get the chance, you have to read one of the many outstanding books written on Shackelton. His story of survival and of small boat sailing in the Southern Ocean is simply amazing.

The Ross Sea Party story is even more amazing.
These men risked and gave their lives to lay food goods and supplies for Shackelton not knowing that he was never going to make it.

Very intriguing reading.

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post #8 of 11 Old 11-07-2007
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The saying "wooden ships and Iron men" is more true than most of we spoiled pampered types can ever truly understand.
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post #9 of 11 Old 11-07-2007
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Quote:
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The saying "wooden ships and Iron men" is more true than most of we spoiled pampered types can ever truly understand.
Iron men and wooden ships. Yes, itís hard to describe being on a footrope and leaning over a spar out over the water. I did it at a time when you didnít use a safety line and itís not one hand for the ship and one for yourself. Instead you use both hands and kick back on the footrope to stay up there. We sailed across the Bay of Biscay in December so I even had the chance to be aloft during a winter gale in the north Atlantic. It was exciting when I was 22 but I wouldnít go aloft today.
All the best,
Robert Gainer

Study the history of naval architecture and move forward knowing what didnít work before.

Donít waste time making the same old mistakes but instead make new ones and to insure your place in history be sure the mistakes are big ones.

Never design a mast that is weaker then the boat
Never design a boat that is weaker then the mast

Never listen to someone describe why your project will not work unless they can show you the broken pieces of their own version.
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post #10 of 11 Old 11-07-2007
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Yes at first it was:
Iron men and wooden ships.
Then it was Iron ships and wooden men.
Now it is FiberGlass boats and Candy Asses...

What do you mean we are lost?? Isn't that land over there?
Yah.... But am not sure if it the state of Maine or Ireland.....?
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