okay--- its coming down to decision time - SailNet Community

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  #1  
Old 11-10-2007
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Red face okay--- its coming down to decision time

My husband and I are getting ready to move aboard a sailboat in Santa Barbara California. I posted and got some feedback from you guys about a month or so ago but some of our variables have changed. We had hoped to get a slip in our harbor but that is not in our future. We just cannot swing spending $50-80k on the slip and then another $50 for our boat. I would rather spend all that $ on our boat and then save towards a slip in the next year if we do not like living off the hook. We just got a letter from the city that we have been approved for a mooring right off our beach. They had a raffle in about 60 days ago for 17 moorings off the beach. About 100 people entered the raffle and only 17 were choosen and we were one. I am trying to take this as a sign that the mooring is our path. We are excited to make the move onto the water. The moorning is a very sought after thing and is pretty close to the the pier and harbor. We currently work 3-4 days a week but we are business owners so we can change our schedule as we see fit.

So I tell you all of this because we are at the point that we need to make a decision on our boat with in 90 days or we will loose our rights to the mooring. We are not looking for a fast boat, we are looking for a dependable cruiser.
I am considering about 3 boats pretty seriously and wanted to get some feedback.
There are 2 Willard 30's (1976) in our area for sale and they seem like a solid boat for the $. Is this too small to live in ? (my husband does not think so but he is giving me the right to final refusal)

There is a 1974 Coronado 41 Sloop for sale. Looks very livaboardable, seems like its been kept up well has a really nice upgraded interior but I am worried about the integrity of the decks and keel on this boat- should I be worried?

Then there is a Nauticat 33 (1973) for sale in Florida that is a totally different style/type of boat but seems like it would make for a good liveaboard. This boat has to be shipped and that worries me a little.

We plan to liveaboard but would like to leave the area and sail away in about 2-3 years. These first few years we would like to spend sailing to the Channel Islands and getting to know our boat, etc...then head off ......any feedback would be appreciated.
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Old 11-10-2007
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My two cents would be that 30 ft is too small these days for live-aboard, not that it can't be done.

The 41 ft boat would have enough space, but I don't know the model to comment further.

The Nauticat 33 has more space than it's length suggests, because of the wheelhouse. Nauticats hold their price well too, and that's usually high. TB is a Nauticat expert, maybe he will comment.
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Old 11-10-2007
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If you are not planning to do any sailing for years, why subject yourselves to living on a sailboat? a cat is certainly preferable in terms of roominess and ease of living compared with a monohull and even better, dare I say this, a stinkpot which is much more comfortable and accessible. Any typical monohull means living in a cave which you have to constantly climb in and out of.
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Old 11-10-2007
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Is it possible to take the option on the slip then sub-let?

Sure would take the pressure off rather than choosing a boat in ninty days. Of course any boat should be surveyed by a professional surveyor prior to purchase.

The downside, if you have to do any repairs, (most likely) it's a bit more difficult away from a dock.

Best of luck!

Last edited by ughmo2000; 11-10-2007 at 07:19 PM.
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Old 11-10-2007
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Here's a couple of questions: How tall are you both and how much stuff do you have? The difference between the boats you are considering, in spatial terms and nothing else, is vast. Think living out of a sports car versus living out of a camper van.

Instinctively, I'd pick the 41-footer, but the Nauticat 33 is (as I am sure you will hear shortly) an excellent live-aboard choice and probably equals a 36-37 footer if it was a typical aft-cockpit sloop. On the other hand, 1973 is elderly for a salt-water boat...even freshwater, six-months a year early '70s boats here on the Great Lakes are showing their age, so that's a consideration. So is the state of the engine, sails, etc.

A bigger boat isn't just about the space, either, from the "living on a mooring" perspective: it's about the sizing and the robustness, for lack of a better term, of the onboard systems. A bigger boat may have hot, pressurized water and a place to shower: even six gallons of hot H20 will up the civility. A bigger boat will have adequate refrigeration, mechanical aids, maybe even A/C. And while all these devices can break and eat amps, it's possible to take a fraction of the money you didn't spend on a stupid slip and put in wind generators, a genset, bigger batteries, solar panels, etc. by which you'll be able to live on a mooring in conditions more amenable than eating beef jerky by paraffin lamp.

Not that there's anything wrong with that.

Just make sure the engine's good, because you guys will be sailing to the fuel dock regularly to take on all the gear that will make life more pleasant...unless your last name is Pardey.
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Does it ever rain where you are?
Climbing aboard and traipising out to your boat in a dink every day, at least twice a day is going to get old. Fast.
Add in wet butts every once in awhile due to fog, rain, dew, whatever, and its not going to be the bag of fun y'all signed up for.

thats just one issue.
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Thanks for the feedback - it all really helps. I hope that True Blue will give his feedback on an older Nauticat. We are not planning on traveling yet because we want to just get some practice and we cannot afford California real estate both on land and water. We are renting our house out as we migrate to a boat. To answer you -ughmo2000 - we are not allowed to sublet or lend out any slips or moorings in this town. They are harbor Nazi's.

Hey Valiente-- we have been joking about how tall we are - I am 5ft and my husband is 5'6" so we think we were built to live in small places. Yes, I realize that the boats we are considering are very different from each other and maybe that is why we are stumped.
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Old 11-10-2007
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we do not get a lot of rain here...actually the only time of the year it rains is for about a month in Jan so we will have that issue early in our move...I know it will not be easy but I'm ok with that. I am ok with being on the hook but I just do not want to regret the boat and get the wrong one. I feel like I'm pouring over boats and trying to prevent the inevitable.
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Old 11-10-2007
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k1vsk View Post
If you are not planning to do any sailing for years, why subject yourselves to living on a sailboat? a cat is certainly preferable in terms of roominess and ease of living compared with a monohull and even better, dare I say this, a stinkpot which is much more comfortable and accessible. Any typical monohull means living in a cave which you have to constantly climb in and out of.
I'm gonna agree, just took at peek at my dock neighbors Sea Ray Sundancer 370 and was totally impressed with the layout, very livable. his was a newer model but something like this might be the ticket.
http://www.yachtworld.com/core/listi...g_id=1888&url=
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Old 11-10-2007
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The Nauticat is built to pretty high standards, and may, if properly maintained, be a far better boat than the Coronado, which IIRC, wasn't built to as high a standard. The Nauticat is very roomy for a boat of its LOA, since it carries its beam fairly far forward.

The Willard 30s are too small IMHO for comfortable living aboard, compared to the Nauticat 33 and the Coronado 41. Being on a mooring is going to be relatively inconvenient if you have a day job and are living aboard. The slip fees for a Nauticat 33 are going to be considerably less than those for a Coronado 41, unless you own the slip outright, and then the slip would probably be far more expensive, since you'd be buying a 40' slip as opposed to a 30-35' slip.

A catamaran may be a better choice as a liveaboard, since you'll have a lot more space, and the boat will be more comfortable at anchor than a monohull, since they don't roll the way monohulls do.

Just my $.02 worth.
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