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-   -   Back on market... (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/boat-review-purchase-forum/38474-back-market.html)

merttan 11-13-2007 06:08 PM

Back on market...
 
Hi everyone,
As I withdraw from market to increase my capital for the boat I found some boats those may fit my budget...

I'm wondering what you would say?

34' Seafarer(1974): Condition (according to the ad, I haven't seen the boat yet) glazed gel-coating and some cracks in the fairing compound of the rudder... Needs new bottom paint... Looking at around 1-1.5K repairs?(I'm going to offer 9K if it looks good...)

27' Hunter(1978): Older sails (over 10yrs) ... Looking at 1-2K for new pair of sails?(I'm going to offer 7.5K if it looks good...)

30' Pearson(1973): Gas engine... The boat seems to be in OK shape. (Im going to offer 7K if it looks good...)

30' Cat (1976): needs new engine or rebuild... Rebuild the engine for 3-4K?(I'd offer 4K if I like it...)

What do you think of those boats?

PS: I'm after cruising characteristics such as comfort and reliability... I don't mind the speed since I'm not rushing anywhere:D

kwaltersmi 11-13-2007 06:48 PM

Conditions being equal (or at least representative of what you posted), I'd choose them in this order for coastal cruising:

1) Seafarer
2) Catalina
3) Pearson
4) Hunter

The Catalina 30 has a very sizeable cabin for a 30 footer and parts/knowledge for this model are abundant. Instead of a gasonline rebuild, I'd repower with a diesel.

Valiente 11-13-2007 08:23 PM

For daysailing/coastal, though, an Atomic 4 makes sense, if it's been maintained. For long motor-sailing, the diesel wins. I've rebuilt an Atomic 4, and am preparing to rebuild a diesel. Both have their pluses, but if you're going to run the engine an hour or less per trip, stick with gas. In this price/size range, a repower with diesel could easily exceed the price of the entire boat.

No one objects to an under-27 footer having a 9.9 or smaller long-shaft for an engine, but somehow there's still the idea that a gas inboard makes no sense. If you just use it to get in and out of the mooring field and go head to wind, a diesel makes no sense. The reason I may have to rebuild mine is closely related to lack of use: diesels want to be turned on and left on, whereas a low-compression gas engine isn't harmed by intermittent, brief use.

Sailormann 11-14-2007 12:47 AM

Quote:

34' Seafarer(1974): Condition (according to the ad, I haven't seen the boat yet) glazed gel-coating and some cracks in the fairing compound of the rudder... Needs new bottom paint... Looking at around 1-1.5K repairs?(I'm going to offer 9K if it looks good...)

27' Hunter(1978): Older sails (over 10yrs) ... Looking at 1-2K for new pair of sails?(I'm going to offer 7.5K if it looks good...)

30' Pearson(1973): Gas engine... The boat seems to be in OK shape. (Im going to offer 7K if it looks good...)

30' Cat (1976): needs new engine or rebuild... Rebuild the engine for 3-4K?(I'd offer 4K if I like it...)
My two cents...

The 34 is going to cost a fair buck to keep going. The others will be cheaper.
Gear for the 34 is one size up from a 30 footer in a lot of cases, and you're going to pay more for mooring, storage, etc., etc. If you're on a budget, it's going to be hard to maintain her.

Don't buy the Catalina - if the engine's pooched it can easily run you 10K to remove, repair, replace, reinstall, realign, etc. etc.

Personally, I wouldn't take a late seventies Hunter, regardless of how inexpensive it was...

The Pearson is a good boat.

Maine Sail 11-14-2007 07:25 AM

You mention...
 
You mention nothing about a good survey? How will you know what to offer if you don't have a handle on the actual condition other than aesthetics. I also think your repair estimates are grossly optimistic. Any boat in the 30 feet range that can be purchased for under 10k will take close to that same amount in repairs rather quickly. Been there done that as have many on this board....

The list below is by no means complete but I have added $ symbols next to each. The symbols represent the costs related to a repair more $ = more money..

Some things to look for:

Wet decks $$$$$$$
Chain plates $$
Bulkheads $$$$
keel joint issues $$$$
running and standing rigging $$$$
electrical system $$$
plumbing system $$
fuel tank and internal condition $$$
sea cocks and through hulls $$$
steering mechanism and condition of $$
Moisture in the rudder? $$$$
cutlass bearing $$
rudder bearing $$
stuffing box $
bilge & stringer condition $
blisters $$
how many layers of bottom paint? $
engine with an oil analysis
oil leaks $$
interior cushions moldy? $$$

sailingdog 11-14-2007 07:49 AM

One thing that no one seems to have pointed out. Often, buying the same make/model boat in excellent shape is far less expensive than buying it in "fixer-upper" shape and restoring it. The price difference may only be a few thousand dollars, but the costs in repairs it saves you may be in the tens of thousands of dollars.

This is one reason it generally doesn't make sense to upgrade electronics in a boat you're about to sell—it is almost impossible to recoup the costs of the upgraded electronics in the sale price. A new suite of instruments, like the Raymarine ST60+ Tridata with wind, may well cost $2500, not including installation... but to the buyer, it is only generally worth $300-500. This is true of most upgrades on boats.

sailhog 11-14-2007 08:04 AM

Merttan,
You should take Sailingdog's advice to heart. Also, with a budget like yours, I would look for a boat with an Atomic 4 in it. For less than $1,500 you can rebuild one yourself, or you can have someone like Moyer do it for about $5,000. A few hundred dollars goes a long way on one of these, and it doesn't get you anywhere with a diesel that needs work. If you use common sense, they don't blow up. They go about half as far per volume of fuel, but I'm sure that's something you can live with. People who dismiss the A4 don't know what they are talking about.

ScrimpAndSail 11-14-2007 08:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by halekai36 (Post 222438)
The list below is by no means complete but I have added $ symbols next to each. The symbols represent the costs related to a repair more $ = more money..

Some things to look for:

Wet decks $$$$$$$
Chain plates $$
Bulkheads $$$$
keel joint issues $$$$
running and standing rigging $$$$
electrical system $$$
plumbing system $$
fuel tank and internal condition $$$
sea cocks and through hulls $$$
steering mechanism and condition of $$
Moisture in the rudder? $$$$
cutlass bearing $$
rudder bearing $$
stuffing box $
bilge & stringer condition $
blisters $$
how many layers of bottom paint? $
engine with an oil analysis
oil leaks $$
interior cushions moldy? $$$


What do you mean by wet decks???

AjariBonten 11-14-2007 08:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ScrimpAndSail (Post 222461)
What do you mean by wet decks???

I think Halekai means decks that are soft from water intrusion under the laminate into the core.

From what I have been reading that can be anything from a weekend PIA to scrapping the boat for $$$$. Look for soft spots anywhere anything penetrates the deck, like chainplates and stanchions, hatches, ports, mast steps, etc.

Good luck in your search, we're all pulling for you....

Fred

sailingdog 11-14-2007 08:54 AM

If the boat has a cored deck, and the core has gotten wet and started to delaminate, the areas that have the problem generally need to be taken apart, have a new core laminated in and then have the laminate re-built over it. Very time consuming, and if you hire someone to do it...very, very expensive.
Quote:

Originally Posted by ScrimpAndSail (Post 222461)
What do you mean by wet decks???



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