Buying ready to go--vs--fix er upper - SailNet Community
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post #1 of 24 Old 12-08-2007 Thread Starter
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Buying ready to go--vs--fix er upper

choices choices I guess its all about time, I think one would want to fix up thereby knowing where evrything nook n cranny is when a problem arises offshore.. the fixerupper has a definate advantage as the ready to sail has the gee let me guess where this problem is kinda thing I guess one could buy a ready to go boat and go through it ,,, but there is always the unexpected isn't there just some thoughts on this lovely day
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post #2 of 24 Old 12-08-2007
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The lament is more often stated as - do you want to sail or maintain, fix, repair, etc...
There is nothing to prevent an owner of a new boat from doing a meticulous inspection check of everything on board such that he is as familiar with every system as the owner/manufacturer who installed them.

My impression is this issue turns more on one's budget.
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post #3 of 24 Old 12-08-2007
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I am not even sure if buying "ready to go" actually exists. When "gone" one usually discovers the things that are missing.
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post #4 of 24 Old 12-08-2007
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If you're able to do engine, electrical, electronic, plumbing, woodwork,rigging etc. yourself, and be confident it's done right, then a fixer-up-er may be ok for you. If you need to pay professionals to do the work then it is probably false economy.
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post #5 of 24 Old 12-08-2007
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It really depends on what your short term and long term goals are. If you're looking to buy a boat that you'll be cruising long-term, and have the time, money and skills to do a lot of re-fitting...then get a fixer upper that has the hull, deck and rigging in good shape. The more of your boat that you've worked on personally, and the better you know your boat, the safer it is for you in the long run IMHO.... provided you have the skills to do a proper job. That said, most sailboat repairs require a bit of knowledge, a lot of common sense, and in some cases a few specialized tools. I've found that many sailors lack the bit of knowledge, but that is relatively easy to remedy... and just as many lack the lot of common sense, which means they're basically doomed to failure.

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post #6 of 24 Old 12-08-2007
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You also need to factor in the time lost when you could be sailing or doing other things.
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post #7 of 24 Old 12-09-2007 Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
It really depends on what your short term and long term goals are. If you're looking to buy a boat that you'll be cruising long-term, and have the time, money and skills to do a lot of re-fitting...then get a fixer upper that has the hull, deck and rigging in good shape. The more of your boat that you've worked on personally, and the better you know your boat, the safer it is for you in the long run IMHO.... provided you have the skills to do a proper job. That said, most sailboat repairs require a bit of knowledge, a lot of common sense, and in some cases a few specialized tools. I've found that many sailors lack the bit of knowledge, but that is relatively easy to remedy... and just as many lack the lot of common sense, which means they're basically doomed to failure.
Thus -- lack of commom sense usally means -coast guard- mostly in places where one should'nt be --hey are those breakers over there lets go see lol

Last edited by codmander; 12-09-2007 at 09:18 AM.
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post #8 of 24 Old 12-10-2007
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Write down the jobs, calculate time, calculate yard cost, calulate your do-it yourself costs, and be honest with yourself, willyou enoy doing it yourself because you can and you want to with each job, and see how many come out in favour of you doing versus, you would prefer if a yard did it.
and go from there.
Good Luck
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post #9 of 24 Old 12-10-2007
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It bears repeating: buy the best boat you can for the money you're able to spend.

Life is too short to sail ugly boats.

Commodore, OPBYC
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post #10 of 24 Old 12-11-2007
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I bought a fixer upper. B/c I could afford it, didn't want a boat payment, mortgage payment, car payment, etc. So I bought a cheap one. I also have a free place to store it and work on it until she's ready to sail. This luxury doesn't go un-noticed. Also, I'm doing all the work myself. So for me, it was a matter of how much my time was worth. If any of these factors had been different, then I would've bought a nicer boat, had a payment, and be currently complaining about how expensive it is to store a boat that I'm not sailing over the winter.

It comes down to your individual situation. And how much your time is worth. You can always make more money, can't get back the weekends you spent working on your boat, wishing you were somewhere else.
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