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  #11  
Old 01-01-2008
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Even for the same monohull length, there's a lot of variation in weight. A Fisher 38 weighs in at about 13 tonnes, compared to my Elvstrom 38 at 7 tonnes. I think mooring alone in a strange marina in a heavy cross wind is about as challenging as it normally gets for a solo sailor.
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  #12  
Old 01-01-2008
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By properly setup I think you mean making sure the lines are all led back to the cockpit and that kind of a thing. If not, could you say a little more about this ? I would appreciate it.
This can include things like having all the lines led aft so you can raise, drop or reef the main from the cockpit. On most boats that would mean you'd need the main halyard, topping lift, outhaul, reef clew and tack lines for reef #1 and #2... so seven lines led aft at a minimum. You also might lead a boomvang or cunningham line aft.

The jib halyard can generally be left at the mast, since most jibs/genoas are on roller furling nowadays..

BTW, I prefer a boom brake over a preventer, as they're much simpler to deal with and generally easier for the short-handed sailor to use. In some ways, they're also safer to use, since they do allow the boom to move—albeit far more slowly than it would if not under the restraint of a boom brake. You can generally set and forget a boom brake—while a preventer generally needs to be unclipped before and then re-clipped after every gybe.

You'll also want to consider where the roller furling lines lead back to, since you'll be wanting to be able to unfurl, furl or reef your roller furling headsail from the cockpit.

A good sail to have if you're sailing shorthanded is a roller-furled asymetric or screacher. This sail is exceptionally easy to deploy and relatively simple to use, and provides you with a lot of sail area for light winds. It is far simpler to use than a traditional symmetric spinnaker, with less risk of broaching, but doesn't give you quite as much horsepower.

You also have to pay attention to how the mainsheet and genoa sheets are setup. On some boats, the mainsheet and helm are aft but the genoa sheets are at the forward end of the cockpit—making it a bit more complicated to singlehand the boat. This is especially important on some of the coastal cruisers, since they will often have a larger cockpit than a bluewater type boat will of the same LOA, making the distance from the front to the helm even further. On a tiller-steered boat, you can often get away with this kind of setup by using a tiller extension and leading the mainsheet forward to where you can reach it while working with the genoa sheets. This is something that you will need to look at as it varies quite a bit depending on the boat.

Another thing that helps is how the instruments are setup. Can you see them from where you normally will be when at the helm? Can you see them when you change position from a starboard to a port tack?

Having line controlled genoa fairleads and mainsheet traveler are also good if your sailing short-handed. It makes adjusting them much simpler.

BTW, a small tiller pilot can often be used to steer a boat that has a windvane setup, even if the boat is wheel steered.

I hope this helps.
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  #13  
Old 01-01-2008
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Go for it!

You will not look back with any dissapointment.

We moved from a Catalina 25 to a Catalina 36 and it was much easier to sail solo. Docking is another story but we are on a mooring so that is not an issue day to day for us. When we moved up to our current boat a Catalina 42 sailing became easier with the addition of autopilot and furling main. Now regardless of wind "suprises" I can reef down to just the right sail combo.

Best of luck to you in your decision.

John
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  #14  
Old 01-01-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
BTW, a small tiller pilot can often be used to steer a boat that has a windvane setup, even if the boat is wheel steered.
Hey SD - a big autohelm is a solo sailor's best friend
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  #15  
Old 01-01-2008
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Yes, but a big autohelm costs big boat bucks...and if you're going to have a wind vane, you can often get away with a tiny tiller pilot for far fewer boat bucks. Tiller pilot like an ST1000 is about $500, a big boat wheel autopilot is at least three or four times that. An under-deck quadrant pilot is probably closer to six or seven times that.
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Hey SD - a big autohelm is a solo sailor's best friend
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #16  
Old 01-01-2008
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A fraction of the cost of a high maintenance crew
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  #17  
Old 01-01-2008
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Some crew is worth the cost...
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A fraction of the cost of a high maintenance crew
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Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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  #18  
Old 01-01-2008
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I moved from 21' to 32' eight years ago, and found many differences.

Much of the advice above is good, and my suggestion is to pay close attention to two factors that will bear significantly on costs, maintenance, ease of sailing and overall enjoyment:

1. What is the change in displacement (not just the increase in length);

and 2. How complex are the systems on the new boat compared to the old?

My last boat was a Freedom 21, which displaced about 2,000 pounds and had hardly any mechanical, electrical or plumbing systems of note. My more recent boat is a Morris 32, which displaces about 12,000 lbs., and has much more complicated and expensive systems, including hot and cold pressure water; engine driven refrigeration; fresh and waste water systems; 6 winches plus windlass (versus 2 and none on the Freedom); a real electrical system with 3 batteries, small inverter, dockside and engine driven re-charging capabilities, etc.; a galley with propane stove and broiler; etc., etc.

Comparing the costs of operating a new daysailor/weekender like the Freedom to a used but larger and more complicated diesel engined boat is certainly like comparing apples and oranges. Some of the costs are difficult to compare because I moved from a large inland lake (Lanier, near Atlanta) to salt water (Cape Canaveral). Nonetheless, without adjusting for inflation over the last 20 years here are some differences:

Dockage: I now pay per month what I used to pay per year at Lake Lanier. That's not due to the size difference particularly, just the tight market for dockage in Florida.

Insurance: Up more than 12 times, due to a ten times increase in price and greater risk in Florida.

Sails, standing and running rigging: Much more expensive due to the larger sizes in all dimensions (length, cross-section, and weight). E.g., sails not only contain more square feet, they are built of heavier cloth and they include features on bigger boats that aren't often found on smaller, lighter boats.

Maintenance and upgrades: Vastly higher, but also quite variable depending on how much you will do yourself and what kind of condition you want to keep your boat in. Many folks say to plan on 10% of the initial purchase price of the boat as a recurring annual maintenance and upgrade figure. That's only a crude rule of thumb, which I've occasionally exceeded and sometimes come in below. I will caution you that it's hard to overestimate what it costs to replace or upgrade pieces on a more complicated boat, particularly as it increases in size.

Other operating costs: probably will increase not just because of the increase in size, but also because you may well travel further in the larger boat.

There's a lot to be gained when going from a boat in the mid 20's to one in the mid 30s, including speed, carrying capacity, more comfortable motion, more luxurious accomodations, etc. But you're also getting to a boat size where you can't manhandle hardly anything. Plan ahead, use the mechanical devices onboard to ease the work, and you'll be OK.
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  #19  
Old 01-01-2008
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Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Some crew is worth the cost...
Yes, but I still need a good autohelm with which to sail solo.
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  #20  
Old 01-01-2008
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I went from a Newport 28 (@7,000 lbs, fin keel) to a Gulf 40 (@22,500 lbs, full keel). I won't repeat all the great things others have already said (OK, becuase honestly I didn't read each and every line, so if I am being redundant... sorry), but I believe one of the most important elements in moving up to a larger boat is confidence. And I'm not speaking of false bravado style confidence. I mean knowing that you can handle the boat with aplomb. In a Buddhist sense, you need to "become one with the boat", in that she is an extension of your body and mind. That sounds weird even to me, but it works! I always suggest to people that they get to the point with their "smaller" boat that they can do anything with it they want, in (just about) any circumstance. If it takes practice, then practice. I actually found the bigger boat gave me a sense of confidence in her, probably due to the 60 hp engine and larger screw, which made maneuvering in tight quarters fairly easy. Prop walk is your friend!

I also have a friend who went from a 26 foot fin keel to a Formosa 51. ANd his nickname with the first boat was "Captain Crunch"! But the transition went just fine, and he moves that big old gal in and out of places like a pro. I think it's because he is VERY confident...
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