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  #1  
Old 01-10-2008
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Transport Across the Pond

Hi All,

Looking for input and ideas to a hair brained scheme that I am tossing around.

I live in the middle of Europe and wish to start sailing again. To do this, I need a boat. So I intend to have one in a marina somewhere on the coast (Nth Sea, Baltic, Med, Adria etc).

The most reasonably priced yachts I am looking at all seem to be on the other side of the pond. I would love a Hallberg, Malö, Hylas etc, however, the boss accountant doesn't...so I am reduced to looking over 20+ year old Whitby's, Pearsons, Cape Dory's etc.

Now the crux, what would the very rough costs be, to get a 40-42ft-ish yacht across the pond? I have looked at these lovely ships that come along and lift the whole shebang up onto the deck and then carry it across, problem solved. Would be high costs, but leaves the market much more open to find something suitable.

The other option would be to get someone to sail it over. This would be great, because I get to come along, and experience firsthand the terror of sailing across in an unknown boat. Which brings me to the next point, and that is, what is considered to be the minimum equipment list (MEL for any aviators out there)? I ask this because I was at one stage looking at buying a Bavaria to send over to the BVI's, and they are delivered to France, the delivery skipper comes along does some seatrials, checks etc, put his stuff onboard and off he goes. Of course the yacht is new, so this I would imagine reduce the risk dramatically.

I look forward to the input from those who are much more experienced in these matters (i.e - everyone)

Tim
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Old 01-10-2008
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Old 01-10-2008
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Hi Tim,

My wife and I are currently in the same situation - we are looking for a Prout of some description, and here in Blighty they 'aint half' expensive when comparing to the states.

We have approached some people, and have found that typically, to sail it across is between £8k and £10k, although those are not firm quotes. To have it stuck on the deck of a larger vessel is in the order of £14k upwards. Note that we do not have firm quotes yet as we havn't decided on the yacht size yet, 33, 34, 37 or 39!! All have merits, but that is another thread.

Also, (only asked one of the skippers we approached) they would not allow me on the delivery trip. Unsure if this was just that one delivery bloke or policy.

IMHO, a new yacht is not safer than an older one always - depends on lots of things. Some new yachts are not always put together as they should be!

Best of luck, and I would love to hear how things pan out for you.

Mike
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Old 01-10-2008
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As Mike has pointed out, not all delivery captains will allow you to come along, especially as they need to have crew that will allow them to get the delivery done as quickly as they can, and you may not have the skills or experience required by them.

Getting your sailboat, and putting it on a ship to bring it over to Europe is going to be fairly expensive. You should probably contact Dockwise to get a rough idea of the costs involved.

Also, be aware that you will need to pay for the dock fees in the USA until you can get your boat onto the transport ship or the delivery captain takes the boat out to sea, and in many states, if you exceed a certain time period, you'll also be responsible for paying taxes on the boat in the state. You should keep this in mind when looking to purchase, since certain times of the year are better than others for crossing the Atlantic.

A delivery captain is probably less expensive than shipping the boat across, but comes with more risks to your boat, since it will have to make the journey across the ocean on its own power, and may be damaged in the process.

Of course, a lot of this depends on what boat you decide to buy. If you don't get a true bluewater passage maker, then shipping the boat, rather than having it delivered would probably make a lot more sense.

Omatako, one of the posters on this forum, recently bought a boat in California and sailed it back to New Zealand, IIRC. This would be your third option... sailing it back yourself.
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Old 01-10-2008
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Figure $20k or so via Dockwise for a typical 40' boat. I also would suggest that if you look at the costs to hire someone to sail the boat across you also need to look at the costs of typical wear and tear on the boat and the cost of the offshore insurance necessary...these could easily eat up the cost savings vs. shipping...and one good storm could REALLY make it look like a bad tradeoff.
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I read an account of a guy who was able to work within the schedule of a freighter and got a pretty good rate from the north sea to cheasapeake. this was a year ago and don't remember the details, sorry. might be worth looking into the shipping companies that ship from your area to the us and return to eu empty. your boat is better than nothing for them
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A sailboat that is 40' long is going to be a problem for most freighters. It really needs to go on a specialized transport ship. There are some new boats that are designed to fit in a standard freight container, and if you bought one of these, getting it shipped to Europe would probably be relatively inexpensive... but they're quite expensive and still relatively new, so little chance of them being on the used market.
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Old 01-10-2008
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Tim,

Forgot to say...do not forget that you must pay VAT in Blighty (or somewhere in the EU anyway - do not think we are the cheapest).

And a final option (the one which the Admiral and I are probably going for) is to buy the yacht in the States, and start the cruise from there. I have been told that it has some nice places !!

Mike
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Old 01-10-2008
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Tim,

drop me a PM at your leisure, I have some documents from HM Customs and instructions that might allow you to import your vessel to the UK without having to pay E.U. VAT.

I looked at shippings costs for a 43" from Miami to Australia and the prices are ... frightening ... If you don't have set schedules and can wait for the right season I think getting a skipper who will take owners along will be the best solution - and there are some out there who are RYA certified and can teach the course material and practical experience leading to the RYA Yachtmaster certification.
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Old 01-10-2008
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Hi All,

Thanks for the input so far, it was never going to be a easy thing.

MikeandDonna - VAT is not really a problem as I do not live in the UK. The VAT is 'only' 7% here.

Sailingdog & Cam - This is the problem. Waiting for a ship will entail further costs in the US, as will waiting for a delivery skipper.
On the other hand, if I find the boat of my dreams, it will take some time to get used to her, and to prepare her for the passage. All it takes is a big blow and something fails, then we can kiss all that goodbye. If the skipper allows me to come or not is essentially irrelevant.

Zanshin - As mentioned, VAT is not really an issue where I live. The tip of the RYA certified teaching the course material is a good idea. I will look into that further.

In general - What would be considered a 'reasonable' amount to make the passage across into the Baltic Sea starting from FL?

Oh yes, 40ft is not cast in stone. As I have mentioned in another thread, I have to have the headroom as I am 6'3"...

Thanks again for the input

Last edited by TassieBloke; 01-10-2008 at 11:09 AM.
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