old boat vs new boat - Page 2 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #11  
Old 02-07-2008
Banned
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: MS Gulf Coast
Posts: 711
Thanks: 0
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 0
seabreeze_97 is on a distinguished road
Losing battle. So your choices are, work on a boat, and have her in a funk and complaining, or have her not complaining about you working on the boat, and talking about everything else on the planet, driving you nuts. :-) Well, at least she won't be mad at you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #12  
Old 02-07-2008
CaptKermie's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Greater Vancouver B.C. Canada
Posts: 433
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 9
CaptKermie is on a distinguished road
I have always subscribed to the mantra that:
"If it is not a boat your wife likes, you are not getting one"

Funny thing about women they don't want to buy someone elses dirt unless it is a used house, then they will disinfect it. When it comes to a boat they often want a new one that does not have any PO's dirt.
The up side to a new boat is that it starts as a blank canvas to be painted/outfitted custom like to your wants/needs. Everything is new and state of the art, nothing to break down and you can take pride in your design of it.
Downside is cost, very expensive!
Buying used one generally gets all the extras they may want already installed, albeit somewhat outdated but at least it costs less, and the PO's have taken the initial depreciation loss. Used is a bit more economical but if the wife does not like it you will be sailing solo.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #13  
Old 02-07-2008
TwentySeven's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Barcelona
Posts: 91
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
TwentySeven is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by genesis2 View Post
Beautiful boats, specially the Taswells, the problem is that they are mostly in America, and we have to buy it in Europe, where we are going to start our sailing
Are you sure it is worth it to buy her in Europe, with the euro 1,6 times higher than it was some years ago? For the range of prices you are talking I'm sure you will save lots of money buying the boat in the US and having it moved to Europe.

Another consideration: Sun Odissey is a pretty extrem rigged-appartment kind of boat. Maybe you can compromise with a more seaworthy model that still is almost as confortable as the Sun Odissey. For instance, something equivalent to Beneteau's First, or Dufour, Dehler, etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #14  
Old 02-07-2008
tdw's Avatar
tdw tdw is offline
Super Fuzzy Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Sydney Australia
Posts: 14,753
Thanks: 5
Thanked 75 Times in 70 Posts
Rep Power: 10
tdw is a jewel in the rough tdw is a jewel in the rough tdw is a jewel in the rough
Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptKermie View Post
I have always subscribed to the mantra that:
"If it is not a boat your wife likes, you are not getting one"

Funny thing about (some) women they don't want to buy someone elses dirt unless it is a used house, then they will disinfect it. When it comes to a boat they often want a new one that does not have any PO's dirt.
The up side to a new boat is that it starts as a blank canvas to be painted/outfitted custom like to your wants/needs. Everything is new and state of the art, nothing to break down and you can take pride in your design of it.
Downside is cost, very expensive!
Buying used one generally gets all the extras they may want already installed, albeit somewhat outdated but at least it costs less, and the PO's have taken the initial depreciation loss. Used is a bit more economical but if the wife does not like it you will be sailing solo.
My edit to your quote. Sorry to contradict you but such an all encompassing statement is somewhat silly.

We bought our old girl three years ago when she was getting on for 15 years old. The Ms of the Clan Wombat was quite happy with the choice and had no complaints about buying a used boat. Indeed, for the last three years we have tromped around the Sydney boat show and in a realistic price range have only found one boat in that time which we would consider buying new. Yes we have seen new boats that we both liked but they have been well and truely outside our price range.

Almost certainly our next boat will be second hand and that is as much her choice as mine.

Ok, so it's wise to buy something that you both like but that's just common sense.

In regard to dear old True Blue (the boat not the bloke ) she actually comes across as a boat a lot of women would adore. Sure there are a couple of things about her that are not perfect to me but in general she was a boat that I'd have thought was female friendly. Yet from TB's posts it appears that the very things that make me think female friendly were the very things that Ms TB didn't like.

Horses for course kiddie, horses for courses.
__________________
Andrew B

"Do you think God gets stoned? I think so... Look at the platypus." Robin Williams.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #15  
Old 02-07-2008
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 288
Thanks: 1
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 7
genieskip is on a distinguished road
What she doesn't know is that no matter how new, no boat is just turn the key and go. You are going to be fussing, working and upgrading on a one week old boat. Boats are, like wives, high maintenance.
__________________
genieskip
Northeast
J40
1991
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #16  
Old 02-07-2008
Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 70
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
bristol321 is on a distinguished road
Just my two cents (thats all I've got left) Without the joy of working on this boat and the pride in sailing something I worked on it seems kind of pointless. (IMHO) I can work for days and not recall what I was thinking about for the better part of them. Just reading this site shows how much all of us love our boats and fiddling with them. New is great sure, but....
"there is nothing, absolutely nothing, half so much worth doing, as simply messing about in boats." The Wind in the Willows
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #17  
Old 02-07-2008
TrueBlue's Avatar
Señor Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Narragansett Bay
Posts: 4,853
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 13
TrueBlue is a jewel in the rough TrueBlue is a jewel in the rough TrueBlue is a jewel in the rough
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdw View Post
In regard to dear old True Blue (the boat not the bloke ) she actually comes across as a boat a lot of women would adore. Sure there are a couple of things about her that are not perfect to me but in general she was a boat that I'd have thought was female friendly. Yet from TB's posts it appears that the very things that make me think female friendly were the very things that Ms TB didn't like.

Horses for course kiddie, horses for courses.
Thanks for that very astute (and right-on) bit of wisdom td. Not to detract further from the OP's post, but I searched very carefully for a boat that I thought would be more she-worthy, as well as sea-worthy (that was really bad ). My hopes were, in spite of the vessel being older, but extremely well preserved, it was very comfortable and well-appointed for it's size, down below - where it really counts with a woman. Didn't work and we're in a holding pattern, on to other boats in short time.

I just ordered two of these though:



These expedition Kayaks will allow us to clear our heads on the beautiful coastal waters of our cruising grounds this summer - prior to deciding what our next boat wil be. This time - I'm all ears.
__________________
True Blue . . .
sold the Nauticat
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #18  
Old 02-07-2008
chucklesR's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Pasadena Md - Magothy side
Posts: 5,979
Thanks: 10
Thanked 31 Times in 31 Posts
Rep Power: 10
chucklesR is a jewel in the rough chucklesR is a jewel in the rough chucklesR is a jewel in the rough
Buy the boat you both can live with - it's more important than old vs new.

I bought new because someone has to - otherwise you guys wouldn't have old boats to buy ; and because the Admiral said to buy new of course.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #19  
Old 02-07-2008
chucklesR's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Pasadena Md - Magothy side
Posts: 5,979
Thanks: 10
Thanked 31 Times in 31 Posts
Rep Power: 10
chucklesR is a jewel in the rough chucklesR is a jewel in the rough chucklesR is a jewel in the rough
TB,
Get the Gemini, come to the dark side. You know you want to, you all do.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #20  
Old 02-07-2008
Banned
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: MS Gulf Coast
Posts: 711
Thanks: 0
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 0
seabreeze_97 is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by genieskip View Post
What she doesn't know is that no matter how new, no boat is just turn the key and go. You are going to be fussing, working and upgrading on a one week old boat. Boats are, like wives, high maintenance.
And you lose half on the trade-in.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Construction of a PVC (Divinycell) cored boat Giulietta Sailboat Design and Construction 8 10-19-2007 06:46 PM
Naming and Renaming Your Boat Sue & Larry Cruising Articles 0 12-15-2003 08:00 PM
Fine-Tuning the Autopilot, Part Two Dan Neri Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 10-13-2003 09:00 PM
Performing in Light Air Brian Hancock Learning to Sail Articles 0 01-15-2003 08:00 PM
The Balance of Hull and Sails Steve Colgate Learning to Sail Articles 0 05-25-2000 09:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 12:44 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.